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Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7204
Date
1998 May 21-29
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 49
Date
1998 May 21-29
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 49
Mover
Mrs. P. Creighton
Seconder
Bishop M. Bedford-Jones
Prologue
Moved by: Bishop V. Matthews
Seconded by: Mrs. E. Hutchinson
That this General Synod commend the statement on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide and its supporting documentation for use as a study paper throughout the Anglican Church of Canada; and request the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee to gather responses and report to the Council of General Synod in March, 1999.
Text
Amendment
That the resolution commence with the wording:
That, subject to further editing, this General Synod....CARRIED
The amended resolution was then put and - CARRIED Act 49
Notes
[The resolution now reads: That, subject to further editing, this General Synod, commend the statement on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide and its supporting documentation for use as a study paper throughout the Anglican Church of Canada; and request the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee to gather responses and report to the Council of General Synod in March, 1999.]
Subjects
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglicans approve report opposing euthanasia, assisted suicide

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7129
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 28, 1998 -- The Anglican Church of Canada's chief governing body has endorsed a report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The 300 members of the Anglican General Synod meeting here this week, commended the report which states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community". The report will now go to Anglican churches across the country for study and response.
Bishop Victoria Matthews of Edmonton who proposed the motion, said the report was created to engage Christians in ethical and theological reflection relating to euthanasia and assisted suicide. Our purpose is not to try and tell the government how to act, but to help Anglicans become aware of the concerns surrounding these practices".
Bishop Matthews said Christians view life as a gift that is not ours to discard", and noted that every life must be considered in relation to those in the wider society.
The report states that the Christian response is always one of hope. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
The resolution approved by General Synod asks that the report and supporting documents be circulated throughout the Canadian Anglican community and that responses be considered by next year by the Council of General Synod. The council meets in years when General Synod does not.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

27. Report of the Task Force on Human Life - Report on Euthanasia

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2884
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Whytehead
Seconder
Fenwick
Prologue
Dr. L. Whytehead and the Rev. Canon Paul Chidwick presented this report and spoke briefly to it.
Text
That this report be received. CARRIED
Subjects
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Dying : considerations concerning the passage from life to death
Less detail

27. Report of the Task Force on Human Life - Report on Euthanasia

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2885
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Graham
Seconder
Broadwell
Text
That this paper be received and published for study and presentation to General Synod. CARRIED
Notes
It was AGREED that all recommendations be published with the text and that a prologue indicating the status of the document be included.
The Prolocutor expressed appreciation on behalf of the members of the National Executive Council to the members of the Task Force for the reports.
Subjects
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Dying : considerations concerning the passage from life to death
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Less detail

Report of the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee : Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7035
Date
1998 March 6-8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 09-03-98
Date
1998 March 6-8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 09-03-98
Mover
Bishop M. Ingham
Seconder
Captain B. Park
Prologue
Moved by Ms. L. Roff
Seconded by Mr. J. Parsons
That this Council of General Synod receive the statement on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide with its supporting documentation and commend the statement to General Synod for adoption as a policy statement of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Text
Amendment
That the words after "documentation" on the second line be deleted and replaced with the following:
"for distribution as a study paper throughout the Anglican Church of Canada; responses to be gathered by the FWM Committee and reported to COGS by March 1999." CARRIED
Notes
The motion as amended now reads:
That this Council of General Synod receive the statement on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide with its supporting documentation for distribution as a study paper throughout the Anglican Church of Canada; responses to be gathered by the FWM Committee and reported to COGS by March 1999.
CARRIED as amended #09-03-98
A second resolution commending the supporting documentation to General Synod was withdrawn.
Subjects
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Euthanasia and assisted suicide a "failure of human community" Anglican report says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7125
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 24, 1998 -- Anglicans across the country will be asked to respond to a new report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The report, which will be presented to the 300 members gathered for the Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod meeting here this week, states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community".
"The Christian response is always one of hope," the report says. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report goes on "We would further urge that the attempt to change the law and practice at a time when health services are being cut back and costs downloaded onto patients and their families is inappropriate."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
General Synod delegates are to debate the report in the next few days.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Public health - Canada
Less detail

XXII. Report - "Dying - Considerations Concerning the Passage From Life to Death

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7357
Date
1979 October 29 - November 1
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1979 October 29 - November 1
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Archbishop Watton
Seconder
Bishop Stiff
Prologue
General reaction to the Report was favourable. It was suggested that a more positive emphasis on life might be included, and that care should be taken when the final editorial revision is undertaken to ensure that no sentences of the report could be abstracted from their context and thus given an incorrect emphasis.
Text
"That the House agrees that the report merits publication." CARRIED
Subjects
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Theological Statement

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official533
Date
1990 November
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-11-90
Date
1990 November
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-11-90
Mover
Rev. Dr. S. Moxley
Seconder
Dr. D. Maybee
Text
That National Executive Council request the Doctrine and Worship Committee to prepare a theological statement about the use of extraordinary measures to prolong life but which may diminish the quality of life. The statement should provide guidance for various groups involved in the issue, including the State, medical professionals and family members. CARRIED #16-11-90
Subjects
Euthanasia - Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Doctrine and Worship Committee
Less detail

Dying - Considerations Concerning the Passage from Life to Death

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1174
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 70
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 70
Mover
Mr. P.J. Andrewes
Seconder
The Rev. P.C. Jefferson
Text
That
a) the report be sent back to the Task Force or a successor group for re-writing in the light of the total discussion on the floor of Synod, with a clear emphasis on the Christian concern for the sanctity of human life; such re-written report to be published for distribution and study on the authority of the National Executive Council.
b) the Task Force be encouraged to receive submissions from all interested bodies and individuals such as other churches, The Canadian Association for the Mentally Retarded, the Address of Mr. Justice Lamer of the Canadian Law Reform Commission, etc.; and
c) in the meantime Recommendations 2 and 3 on pages 18 and 19 of the interim Report be accepted as a basis for ecumenical action from the present time.
After extensive discussion and debate the Motion was put and CARRIED ACT 70
Notes
The Recommendations referred to in paragraph (c) of the Resolution are:
2) Education
A) That the Church recognize its responsibility to provide educational programmes to effect a better understanding of the needs of the dying patient, of those responsible for the patient's welfare and of the next of kin. We believe that these programmes should focus on a number of specific areas.
a) The delineation, in the continuing education of clergy, of their special role with the dying patient and with their immediate families.
b) The inclusion of similar training and experience within the academic and pastoral programmes of theological colleges.
c) To equip church people for effective ministry to the terminally ill in conjunction with the medical team and for service in volunteer Home Care programmes of hospitals.
d) The establishment of Grief Recovery groups to enable the bereaved to identify and reconcile their feeling of guilt and grief.
e) The development in the Church and in society at large of a more realistic and wholesome attitude to and acceptance of the dying process and of death itself.
B) a) That the Church urge local professional associations to initiate programmes of continuing education for doctors and nurses to develop more skillful and compassionate care of the dying and bereaved.
b) That the Church emphasize the importance of similar training in the curricula of all health care teaching institutions.
3. Patient Care
A) That the Church actively support and encourage all persons and institutions which provide effective care for the terminally ill especially the Palliative Care Units at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal and at St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, working toward the establishment of similar units in other hospitals.
B) That the Church make continuing representations to provincial governments for the provision on a growing scale of small, independent units for the care of terminal patients in which conditions allow the development of close relations between patients, their families and those who care for them.
C) That the Church urge hospitals to expand Home Care programmes in the community with the support of visiting nurses, physician home visits and ancillary services so that dying patients may have the option of remaining at home in the care of their families (see Malkin, S.: "Care of the terminally ill at home", "Canadian Medical Association Journal" 115 (July 17, 1976), p.129
D) That the Church cooperate at the local level with appropriate Medical Boards, District Health Councils, professional societies, provincial associations and other agencies to initiate feasibility studies for improving further the care of dying patients and that findings be forwarded to provincial and the federal governments.
Subjects
Euthanasia - Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palliative care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the bereaved - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of the Task Force on Human Life

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2632
Date
1979 November 7-9
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1979 November 7-9
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rt. Rev. J.C. Bothwell
Seconder
Ven. A.D. Brown
Prologue
Following further discussion it was [moved and seconded]
Text
That a press release be issued on the motion concerning the publication of the report. CARRIED
Notes
Press Release
The National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada has received a final report from the General Synod Task Force on Human Life, "Dying: Considerations Concerning the Passage from Life to Death."
The Council gave "general approval" to the report and ordered that "following the addition of revisions, footnotes and a deepening and amplifying of certain actions as discussed this evening, the report be published together with a suitable introduction by the Primate."
The Report, intended as a study document, does not define policies, but is intended to be, as Archbishop Scott said, "A contribution to a process that has to be ongoing." That process is an examination of the moral questions posed by, and the Christian implications of, the care of the terminally ill and the new born infant with gross and uncorrectable defects.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Dying : considerations on the passage from life to death
Less detail

Anglican Report on Dying Now Available to Public

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3184
Date
1980 April 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1980 April 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Apr. 25, 1980 -- For immediate release
The long-awaited report of the Anglican General Synod's Task Force on Human Life titled, "Dying: Considerations on the Passage from Life to Death," is available to the general public.
The report, which has been the centre of major controversy for three years, and has gone through several revisions, is now published in its final form. The co-editors of the report were Dr. Lawrence Whytehead of Winnipeg and the Rev. Canon Paul Chidwick of Windsor.
"As has been said during those three years, and must be repeated again," said Archdeacon Harry H. Hilchey, the Church's General Secretary, "this is not a policy statement, it is a discussion paper. It will provide for Anglicans, and indeed many other Canadians, constructive assistance in grappling with the vital moral questions being raised by advances in technology and science. Also, it will give much-needed leadership in a critical examination of the manner in which we treat and minister to terminally-ill persons."
A copy of the report can be seen at Diocesan Synod headquarters. Copies may be purchased soon at retail outlets across the country or may be ordered now from Anglican Book Centre, 600 Jarvis St., Toronto M4Y 2J6.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
R.J. Berryman
Media Officer
The Anglican Church of Canada
600 Jarvis St.
Toronto, Ont. M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192 ext. 286
Subjects
Dying : considerations on the passage from life to death
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Dying - Considerations Concerning the Passage from Life to Death

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1236
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 69
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 69
Mover
Dr. R.J. Gardiner
Seconder
Mr. W.R. Shepherd
Prologue
The Primate led the Synod in prayer, and then read the introduction printed in the draft Report.
The Rev. Canon Paul Chidwick was introduced by the Primate who then presented the background to the draft Report. He urged the Synod to bear in mind that this was an interim Report and he asked that discussion be on the Report and not on interpretaions of it.
Text
That this General Synod receive for discussion the Report of the Winnipeg Task Force, "Dying - Considerations Concerning the Passage from Life to Death" as an interim Report and express its appreciation to the Winnipeg Task Force. CARRIED ACT 69
Notes
Dr. Gardiner called for a tribute to the Primate for having set up this and other Task Forces, to which the Synod responded with applause.
The Primate stated that all correspondence received by him in connection with the Report would be acknowledged and passed to the Task Force for their consideration.
Dr. Donald Cameron, Vice President of the Canadian Association of the Mentally Retarded was introduced by the Primate and invited to address Synod. Dr. Cameron voiced the concern of his Association about the Report with special reference to Section III (3). In concluding he commended the Task Force for bringing this subject to the public's attention.
Subjects
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Dying : considerations on the passage from life to death
Less detail

Human Life Task Force

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7923
Date
2001 July 4-11
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 27
Date
2001 July 4-11
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 27
Mover
Mrs. Lela Zimmer
Seconder
Dr. David Gould
Text
That a Human Life Task Force be re-established, reporting through the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee to the Council of General Synod, to reflect theologically on the ethical issues surrounding biotechnologies, euthanasia and assisted suicide, reproductive technologies and human cloning, and to monitor ongoing developments in these areas. Membership of no more than 7 should include 1 member of the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee, ethicists, theologians, scientists and clinicians from the various disciplines as required by the issues. CARRIED Act 27
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Human Life Task Force
Biotechnology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Reproductive technology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Cloning - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report on the Task Force on Human Life

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1698
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 34
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 34
Mover
Miss Betty C. Graham
Seconder
Most Rev. E.W. Scott
Prologue
Miss Betty C. Graham presented the Report on the Task Force on Human Life in place of the Chairman, The Rev. Paul Chidwick.
Miss Graham brought special attention to the conclusion of the Report referring to AID.
"The Task Force would like the report to provide insights and guidance to help the persons involved in making responsible choices about these new techniques - the men and women facing the dilemmas of unwished for sterility, the doctors wishing to adopt a responsible approach to newly available medical techniques, the lawyers whose counsel may be sought, the legislators who ultimately will have to deal with the complex problems the techniques raise. As in its report on abortion, the Task Force wishes to promote serious discussion and to aid the church and the community to make responsible decisions in this expanding area of medical science."
Text
"That this Synod request the Primate to reappoint a Task Force on Human Life to:
a) conclude its study of the issues related to AID (Artificial Insemination, Donor) and after approval by the National Executive Council circulate its report for information and discussion before the end of June, 1976;
b) prepare a report on the issues related to death and dying including the extension of life by mechanical and other means; and after the approval by the National Executive Council, circulate its report for information and discussion by the end of 1976.
and that in accordance with the limitation of size imposed on all our committees, such a Task Force be centred in a specific area and be limited to 12 people (as is the A & F Committee) augmented as necessary by corresponding members."
Moved by: Chancellor J.E. Hudson
Seconded by: Mr. David Leaker
That after Section (b) there be added:
- "c) to continue to study the question of abortion. DEFEATED IN THE ORDERS OF CLERGY AND LAITY
The original motion was then put and CARRIED Act 34
Notes
The Prolocutor thanked Miss Graham and the Rev. P. Chidwick for their report.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Artificial insemination, Human - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Reproductive technology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Medical ethics - Canada
Less detail

Pain, hope, shame and joy : life amongst the bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7133
Date
1998 August 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 August 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
By Michael Peers
TORONTO (7 August 1998) -- From Lambeth Conference, Canterbury, Kent, England.
For the last three weeks I've been living among 750 Anglican bishops gathered at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, for the Lambeth Conference, an event that happens only once every ten years. We've spent most of our time in bible study, prayer and worship, but we've also considered issues that are important in the life of Canada, and of the world.
News reports about the Lambeth Conference have tended to focus on the controversial resolution regarding human sexuality (about which more in a moment). Indeed, if you were to read reports in the English press, they'd have you convinced we spoke of nothing else ! Here are [a] few significant points from the rest of the agenda.
Agonizing decisions will increase
Among this newspaper's readers today are some who are confronting agonizing decisions about medical treatment for loved ones who are no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. At what point, if ever, should the goal of medical treatment shift from prolonging life, to easing the transition from life to death ? The number and complexity of these decisions is likely to increase radically in the next ten years, spurred on both by the aging of the population, and by continuing advances in medical technology.
In an area in which we acknowledge there are few easy answers, Lambeth's contribution has been to offer some ethical guidelines -- signposts, if you will, by which people confronting stark choices about life and death may be helped to determine their personal directions and paths.
As Christians, we affirm as a first principle that life is a gift of God and has intrinsic sanctity, significance, and worth. The Lambeth Conference has drawn a distinction between active and passive responses to issues at the end of life. We believe it is not consistent with Christian faith to take any action which is intended to cause the death of another, even one who is suffering in a painful terminal illness. On the other hand, it may be consistent with Christian faith to enable someone to die with dignity by "withholding, withdrawing, declining or terminating excessive medical treatment." These latter responses are not viewed as euthanasia in our precise definition.
Admittedly, the distinction is a subtle one, but so are the decisions with which many are struggling. I hope Lambeth's exploration of the issues will help those making such choices to explore their own convictions.
News from home
About the only Canadian news to make in into the English press over the past few weeks was the historic signing of the treaty between the Nisga'a people and the governments of British Columbia and Canada. It came as Lambeth was urging compliance with the United Nations universal declaration of human rights, in part as a way of supporting the claims of indigenous peoples. A portion of the Lambeth report reads:
"In every case indigenous peoples are disproportionately poor, have little access to a good education and health care, suffer from higher death rates, and in Australia and the United States are often prone to alcohol and drug addiction. In every case, the plight of these people is given a very low profile. They are ignored and their needs are given low priority. They are not treated as 'neighbours', let alone 'brothers or sisters'.
The Anglican Church has been closely involved with the Nisga'a people, giving modest but unwavering support. Both John Hannen, the bishop of Caledonia, and I have been formally invested as Nisga'a chieftains. News of the signing in this context came as a moment of pride and joy. We share the hope of the Nisga'a and political leaders, that this signing signals the beginning of reconciliation.
Lifting an intolerable burden
Over the past 20 years, some of the poorest countries in the world have been hit by a double whammy. Interest rates on their debts have risen sharply and, at the same time, the prices they can get for their products have fallen.
Changing political realities often lend a cruel twist to international debt. In South Africa, for example, debt repayment is the second largest expenditure in the government budget (after education). Ironically, the debt was incurred by the apartheid regime and its proceeds largely went to paying for the racist oppression of the people who are now paying it off ! The situation is not unique to South Africa.
Overall, for every dollar we in the developing world send overseas as aid, eight dollars comes back as interest, according to the international development organization, Christian Aid. At the same time, the president of the World Bank, Jim Wolfensohn, told the Lambeth Conference that more than 3 billion people now live on less than $2 a day. The World Bank has conceded the point that this ballooning debt, by any realistic standard, can never be repaid -- and that it is one of the most serious barriers to development.
A coalition of Christian and development groups is urging that the debt of the poorest countries be cancelled by the year 2000. For Christians, this initiative is bound up with the Biblical concept of "Jubilee", a time of forgiveness and restoration. For Canadians generally, forgiving the debt of the poorest countries would have a modest economic impact on us, so that the growing disparity between rich and poor at least has a moment when the bottom moves slightly closer to the top.
In Canada, as in most countries of the world, we recognize that a person crushed by debt is unproductive. It is to our advantage that a means be provided to lift that unequal burden, and so our laws provide the option of bankruptcy, allowing the individual to make a fresh start. Similarly, a fresh start is urgently needed on the international scene. Canadians should support the international campaign for debt cancellation.
Upholding virtue or promoting hatred ?
Just what did Lambeth say about human sexuality ? There are two parts to any message: the actual content, and the way the message is perceived. In its content, the Lambeth resolution on human sexuality:
- "upholds faithfulness in marriage between a man and a woman in lifelong union;
- "commits [the bishops] to listen to the experience of homosexual people. We wish to assure them that they are loved by God and that all baptised, believing and faithful persons, regardless of sexual orientation, are full members of the Body of Christ";
- rejects "homosexual practice as incompatible with Scripture", but "calls on all our people to minister pastorally and sensitively to all irrespective of sexual orientation and to condemn irrational fear of homosexuals, violence within marriage and any trivialisation and commercialisation of sex";
- "cannot advise the legitimising or blessing of same-sex unions, nor the ordination of those involved in such unions".
The perception of this message varies from those who receive it with joy as a vindication of traditional Christian teaching and those who find it a devastating betrayal of the gospel of love.
Canada's 1995 General Synod acted to "affirm the presence and contributions of gay men and lesbians in the life of the church and condemn bigotry, violence and hatred directed toward any due to their sexual orientation". This message obviously contains a considerably stronger affirmation of gay and lesbian Christians than the Lambeth text. Even so, much of the content of the Lambeth statement, strictly speaking, is broadly in accord with the current policy of the Anglican Church of Canada. (Canada's policies remain in force since the Lambeth Conference has only advisory, not legislative authority.)
However, I must disassociate myself from any who perceive this action as a "victory". Canadians generally will have been scandalized by some of the reported comments, as were Canadian bishops here. The debate was marked at times by outright condemnation of homosexual persons, sometimes phrased in viciously prejudicial language. This is not consistent with the gospel of Jesus Christ as I understand it.
I have already joined with many other bishops in writing a pastoral letter to gay and lesbian Anglicans. It reads, in part, "We pledge that we will continue to reflect, pray, and work for your full inclusion in the life of the church ... We will call on the entire Communion to continue (and in many places, begin) prayerful, respectful conversation on the issue of homosexuality. We must not stop where this Conference has left off. You, our brothers and sisters in Christ, deserve a more thorough hearing than you received over the past three weeks. We will work to make that so."
Moment of transfiguration
The most moving moment came for me yesterday [Thursday] as I attended a worship service led by the church in Japan, on the anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
As we entered the service, we received copies of an apology from the Japanese church for its complicity in wartime aggression. With wonderful generosity and hospitality, the Japanese church had invited an English priest to preach. The Rev. Susan Cole-King told how her father, then bishop of Singapore, was imprisoned and tortured by the Japanese military in 1943. The church's apology had brought her a deep sense of reconciliation. (She also reminded us Westerners of our own complicity in the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and urged us to continue working for the eradication of nuclear weapons.)
For me, the service evoked two intensely personal memories. The first occurred in my early childhood, in Vancouver, when one of my playmates and his family abruptly disappeared without notice. Much later, I later came to understand why there were always pieces of Japanese decorative arts in my living room; they were among the belongings my father, in the name of the government of Canada, had helped to confiscate. The second memory is more recent. It concerns my experience, five years ago, of apologising on behalf of our church for the abuses suffered by native people in the residential schools we administered. It was a moment of great pain, but it was the beginning of liberation.
In the middle of the Japanese service I wept as I relived those moments. The church is an imperfect reflection of God's reign; a deeply flawed institution. Far too often, it has brought pain instead of healing. And yet, as the Japanese Church showed, it is also a place where we can be open to transformation. When the gospel reaches into our lives, and challenges us, it can enable us to face very difficult truths and to both seek -- and bestow -- forgiveness.
Archbishop Michael Peers is the Primate of Canada. The full text of Lambeth Conference reports and resolutions can be found at www.lambethconference.org.
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For further information contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, Anglican Church of Canada, 416-924-9199 ext. 286 Until 5PM GMT [Noon EST] Saturday, August 8 011-44-1227-828-090 dtindal@national.anglican.ca
After Saturday, August 8, Contact: Karen Evans, Librarian, Anglican Church of Canada, 416-924-9199 ext. 291 kevans@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1998
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Euthanasia - Moral and ethical aspects
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Nishga Indians
Indians of North America - British Columbia - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Debts, External - Developing countries
Debts, External - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Jubilee (Christianity)
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Sex - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Same sex unions - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Homosexuality - Biblical teaching
Ordination of gays - Anglican Communion
World War, 1939-1945 - Religious aspects - Holy Catholic Church in Japan
Japanese Canadians - Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945
Apologies - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Less detail

Referral of Resolutions

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official515
Date
1986 June 14-22
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Date
1986 June 14-22
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Mover
Prof. J.P.E. McLaren
Seconder
Mr. M.D. Clarke
Prologue
Moved by: Dr. D.N. Maybee
Seconded by: Ven. R.T. Pynn
That the following resolutions be referred to the National Executive Council:
Revised Resolution #43
That this General Synod adopt the document entitled "Human Rights Principles for The Anglican Church of Canada" and recommend it for study and implementation at parish, diocesan and national levels under the Direction of the National Executive Council.
Resolution #46
That this General Synod request
(i) that the Doctrine and Worship Committee prepare a theological statement on poverty which will include women's experience; and
(ii) that the Doctrine and Worship Committee involve the Task Force on Women in Poverty in the preparation of the theological statement.
Resolution #47
That the General Synod recognize the feminization of poverty and request the Program Committee and the Women's Unit:
(i) to develop and implement ways to raise the awareness of people in dioceses and parishes about the reality of poverty in women's lives; and
(ii) to report on the resulting experiences and actions to the General Synod in 1989.
Revised Resolution #49
That this General Synod declares unemployment, homelessness and hunger to be major concerns of the Church. We recommend to the National Executive Council that adequate staff time be allocated to assist The Anglican Church of Canada, nationally, provincially and locally to address these concerns in the following ways:
a) to work together to seek just solutions to the problems of unemployment, homelessness and hunger;
b) to work with the unemployed, the homeless and the hungry towards such solutions;
c) to work ecumenically;
d) to challenge and to work with government: federally, provincially and locally to seek a more just society.
Revised Resolution #56
That this General Synod requests the National Executive Council to establish a Task Force to explore and make recommendations regarding the feasiblity of setting up a National Church presence in Ottawa, to support and enrich ongoing dialogue with the federal government.
Revised Resolution #59
That this General Synod call for a national consultation to explore the possibility of establishing an Anglican computer users network and ask the Program Committee to enable such a consultation.
Revised Resolution #60
That this General Synod commends the Principles of a healthy Remuneration System to the dioceses with the request that each diocese study the Principles and the implications of their implementation, and to respond to the Committee on Ministry within the next 18 months, in order that the Committee on Ministry may make recommendations to the 1989 General Synod re: remuneration practice in the Church.
Resolution #62
That this General Synod directs the Office of Personnel Resources to maintain a registry of Licenced Lay Workers in order to facilitate their recognition and mobility within the Church.
Resolution #71
That the Doctrine and Worship Committee be directed to begin a process towards the development of a new hymn book which will provide hymns and other music for worship that complement the Common Lectionary, which draw on a wide variety of styles and traditions and which are couched in language which is as inclusive as possible.
Resolution #84
That the General Synod of The Anglican Church of Canada request the Goverment of Canada to retain the question on religious affiliation in the 1991 national Census, thereby continuing to make available information of great value to the religious communities of Canada.
Resolution #88
That this General Synod, mindful of the oneness of God's human family, urges the General Committee of the Leonard Foundation of Canada to direct its Board of Trustees to apply to the appropriate Court in Canada to write out all references in the Trust Deed which discriminate on the basis of sex and race.
Resolution #89
That this General Synod affirms in principle the amending of Canon XXI (On Marriage in the Church) in order to permit the re-marriage of divorced persons in the Church without the requirement of applying to an Ecclesiastical Matrimonial Commission, and directs the Organization Committee to bring such an amendment before the next General Synod.
Resolution #96
That this General Synod commends the work of Church House staff at this Synod and recommends that serious consideration be given to providing sufficient computer equipment to facilitate their work at the General Synod in 1989.
Resolution #100
That this General Synod reaffirm the National Executive Council (May 1985) condemnation of the U.S. government's economic and military policy toward Nicaragua, particularly its policy of providing covert military aid to the anti-government counter revolutionary forces, and urge the Canadian government to do everything in its power to influence the U.S. government and those of Central America to give their full support to current peace-making efforts in Central America.
Resolution #102
That this General Synod request the Agenda Committee of the thirty-second session of the General Synod
a) to continue our practice of inviting representatives from partner Churches overseas and other denominations in Canada as observers and participants in Synod, and
b) to ensure that plenary session time be planned in order that all members of Synod may hear the partners' critique of the Synod's life and sense of priorities, and also may gain an understanding of the situations in which our partners are in mission.
Resolution #104
That this thirty-first General Synod
1) regard the national membership of The Anglican Church of Canada as comprising those who indicate, in the Statistics Canada National Census, that they are Anglican, and
2) direct all committees, councils, boards, etc., in their deliberations, planning and other activities to accept this definition of membership.
Resolution #105
That this General Synod adopt as a matter of urgent priority the need to reconstruct the Ipelegeng Community Centre in Soweto, and urge the Primate through every means possible for him to effect this priority.
Resolution #106
That the Committee on Ministry be requested to formulate a complete and integrated set of Career Development Guidelines similar to the existing diocesan and national policies dealing with:
i) training
ii) terms of appointment
iii) continuing education plan
iv) pensions and other related matters.
Resolution #109
That the Program Committee expand the scope of the examination of violence against women to include those native cultures within the Anglican Church which have their own distinct economic, family, work, social and educational structures.
Resolution #112
That this General Synod directs the Program Committee and other interested committees:
1) to prepare a theological statement regarding the maintenance and termination of human life;
2) to prepare pastoral guidelines for families faced with decisions related to the resuscitation of loved ones
Text
That Resolution #105 be deleted and be put forward now. CARRIED IN ALL ORDERS.
The motion as amended was put and CARRIED IN ALL ORDERS. Act 92
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (31st : 1986 : Winnipeg, Man.) - Resolutions
Human rights principles for the Anglican Church of Canada
Human rights - Canada
Human rights - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poverty - Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Women and poverty - Canada
Unemployment - Canada
Unemployment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Homelessness - Canada
Homelessness - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hunger - Canada
Hunger - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Canada
Church and state - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and computers - Anglican Canada
Church and computers - Anglican Communion
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Salaries, etc.
Lay ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Employees
Hymns - Anglican Church of Canada
Hymnbooks - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Praise. 1998
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Census, 1991
Canada - Religion - Statistics
Anglican Church of Canada - Statistics
Leonard Foundation
Racism - Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Remarriage - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Divorce - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Matrimonial Commissions - Anglican Church of Canada
Nicaragua
Peace - Central America
Partnership in Mission - Anglican Church of Canada
Church membership - Anglican Church of Canada
Ipelegeng Community Centre (Soweto, South Africa)
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy
Anglican Church of Canada. Committee on Ministry
Family violence - Canada
Family violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Task Force on Human Life - Report on Abortion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4422
Date
1973 November 7-9
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1973 November 7-9
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Brown
Seconder
Peers
Prologue
Dean Nock, in introducing the report of the Task Force on Human Life on Abortion, noted General Synod, 1971, Resolution which called for the establishment of the Task Force, and General Synod, 1973, Resolution requesting the Task Force to produce a report for November NEC on Abortion.
The Primate introduced those members of the Task Force present: Rev. P. Chidwick - Chairman, Rev. P. Gibson, Miss Betty C. Graham, Mr. H. Allan Leal, Mr. S.E. Kingstone, Dr. C.R. Feilding, Dr. David McCallion, Mrs. Phyllis Creighton, Dr. Eugene Fairweather.
Mr. Chidwick, in his introductory remarks, noted that the Task Force will address itself in the future to such pertinent areas of concern as transplantation, cloning, euthanasia, artificial insemination by donor, and stated that the Task Force would be pleased to submit further Papers to the NEC.
Mrs. Phyllis Creighton, in speaking to the Report on behalf of the Task Force, noted three major areas to which the Task Force had given consideration; the Law, the Church's role, and the Community.
Following a period of discussion and dialogue with members of the Task Force the following action was taken.
Text
That this National Executive Council receive the Report on Abortion of the Task Force on Human Life with appreciation to the members of the Task Force for their efforts, insights and recommendations;
That we endorse those recommendations and express the hope that the Task Force will continue its work within the original terms of reference;
And that we commend the Report to the Church, the Government and the Community for study, and that it be referred to the Program Committee to publish and implement the Report in close cooperation with the Task Force on Human Life. CARRIED
Notes
In closing, the Primate thanked the members of the Task Force for their presence, and for their generous gifts of interdisciplinary expertise represented in the Report on Abortion. Archbishop Scott paid special tribute to Mrs. Phyllis Creighton who edited and compiled the Report, and presented Mrs. Creighton with a floral token of appreciation on behalf of the members of the National Executive Council.
Subjects
Abortion - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Creighton, Phyllis
Less detail
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto hospitals are performing abortions "without restriction," according to a prominent official of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Rev. Arthur Brown, rector of a large Toronto parish and a member of the National Executive Council of General Synod made the charge in connection with deliberations on a forthcoming report by a Task Force on Human Life.
The report is not expected to be completed until the end of 1973 and Father Brown said he and other pastors are impatiently awaiting it for guidance on new and complex moral situations.
He told bishops and other delegates from across Canada to the executive council that "all kinds of girls are going through our hospitals in metropolitan Toronto being aborted of pregnancies." His information, he said, comes from nurses and other hospital staff.
Father Brown claimed that staffs in some Toronto hospitals are aborting without restriction "under the guise of it being good for the total health of the mother."
Five years ago, he said, one Toronto hospital listed 28 abortions. Last year, the number was over 300, "ten times as many, or more."
He said "doctors are compromised by the destruction of human life" in this abortion situation. On becoming doctors, he said, they swear an oath to preserve life but due to the present situation "they are placed in a major compromised situation."
Father Brown said nursing staffs are upset over having to clean up after induced miscarriages and they come to him for guidance.
Archbishop E.W. Scott, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada expressed deep sympathy towards the position described by Father Brown but said the task force's report will take another year due to the complexities of the issues involved.
"It's becoming obvious that people are feeling a need for help in making decisions in these areas," Archbishop Scott said.
"Each case has to be evaluated in terms of the health of the mother and the possible health of the child, and not only on the question of the sanctity of life but also in the area of the quality of life."
Archbishop Scott emphasized that hospital boards deciding abortion cases should include persons representing moral issues as well as medical issues.
Besides abortion, the task force is studying the whole concept of when life begins and ends in relation to euthanasia, transplants, biological engineering and the vast implications of discoveries in biochemistry. Archbishop Scott said the study has become increasingly complex as it delves into the legal, medical, moral and social aspects of life. The task force is composed of lawyers, doctors, research scientists, housewives, social workers, theologians and others. It is also consulting with similarly concerned groups in the United States, Britain and other parts of the world.
A progress report will be presented to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada at its biennial meeting next May in Regina.
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For further information, contact:
Michael O'Meara
Director, Communications Division
924-9192 (Business)
742-8327 (Residence)
Subjects
Abortion - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Medical ethics - Canada
Chaplains, Hospital - Anglican Church of Canada
Brown, Arthur D. (Arthur Durrant), 1926-2011
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglicans move closer to Lutherans, ponder meaning of diversity, as nine-day meeting wraps up

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7132
Date
1998 May 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
MONTREAL (May 29, 1998) -- In a nine-day meeting here, the Anglican Church of Canada's chief governing body approved legislation bringing the church closer to Lutherans, opposing euthanasia and cloning, and expressing the church's support to partner churches in several oppressed or war-torn countries.
The church also approved motions asking for government action on several social policy issues.
In the first meeting it has held in Montreal in 30 years, the 300-member General Synod also spent a considerable amount of time reflecting on "nation and identity" and on what it means to be a minority voice in a society as diverse as Canada's.
The theme of this General Synod, a body which meets every three years in a different part of the country, was "Lift every voice -- Faisons entendre nos voix" which was meant to help members focus on those who are often ignored or unheard.
In his opening address at the start of the synod, Archbishop Michael Peers, the primate, set the tone when he told delegates that one of the least heard voices in the Canadian Anglican church was that of French Canada. He challenged synod members to pay particular attention to that voice during the gathering.
Synod members spent a whole evening listening to panel members representing different voices or geographical parts of the country speak about what it means to be a part of the Canadian whole.
Synod members also heard a presentation from the church's indigenous members, a group that is working to implement a "Native Covenant" which would give it greater autonomy within the church.
Host bishop Andrew Hutchison of Montreal delivered a major address in which he expressed the difficulties involved in leading a church that represents a very small number of Anglophones in an overwhelmingly Francophone province.
In his speech, Bishop Hutchison also argued that while the church has no mandate to play a role in partisan politics, it is bound by conscience to take strong positions on matters involving principles such as peace, justice and reconciliation.
Synod members took him to heart, passing more than a dozen resolutions affirming the Canadian church's stand against oppression, injustice, violence and war in several parts of the world.
Through some of these resolutions, the Canadian Anglican church offered expressions of solidarity to partner churches and the people of Kenya, Sudan and Columbia [sic i.e. Colombia] who suffer from war or political oppression. Members voted to ask Ottawa to play a greater mediation role between Cuba and the United States.
Meeting the week that Pakistan exploded a number of nuclear devices in response to similar tests carried out by India, synod delegates called on the Canadian government to renounce the use of nuclear weapons and to exert pressure on other governments to do so as well.
They voted to ask the church's ecojustice committee to produce resources to enable Canadian congregations "to study the Just War theory and its implications for Christian response to war and militarism".
Members also called on the federal government to initiate a broad process of public consultation whenever it negotiates multilateral agreements on investment and trade and to consider the implications of such pacts, especially on the most disadvantaged members of society such as the elderly, the very young and indigenous peoples.
Members also voted to ask the Prime Minister to apologize to Inuit people displaced from traditional hunting areas on the east coast of Hudson Bay and Baffin Island to the High Arctic in the 1950s.
In the area of social policy, General Synod approved [a] resolution saying it cannot support euthanasia and assisted suicide. The resolution described such measures as "a failure of human community".
The church also called on Ottawa to prohibit the cloning of human beings.
The resolution with what may have the broadest impact for the Anglican community itself, was one commending for study a report urging "full communion" between Canadian Anglicans and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada.
Full communion would not be an actual merger of the two churches, but means that each would recognize the other's clergy, rites and sacraments. It could lead to extensive sharing of resources and even personnel between the two denominations. Reactions to that report will be gathered by both churches in the next three years and considered again when their respective governing bodies next meet in the year 2001.
One of the most arduous parts of the proceedings, held in a sweltering gymnasium at McGill University, was a debate on "human rights principles" for church members and employees that would have legislated protection from discrimination on the basis of age, sex, sexual orientation, family or marital status, race, colour, ethnic origin, ancestry, disability, creed and socio-economic status.
The often emotional debate on that resolution stretched over three days and the proposal was ultimately narrowly defeated after synod members failed to agree on a way to marry theological concerns to language more commonly associated with civil courts proceedings.
General Synod, which consists of bishops, clergy and lay people elected to the task in each of the church's 30 dioceses, meets every three years.
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Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.) - Theme
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Full communion
Human rights principles for the Anglican Church of Canada
Human rights - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nuclear weapons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Just war doctrine - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada
Less detail

Debates and resolutions on church and social issues await delegates to Anglican General Synod

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7043
Date
1998 April 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 April 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO (April 29, 1998) -- More than 300 delegates to the Anglican Church of Canada's 35th General Synod will gather at McGill University in Montreal May 20 to 29 to chart the church's future into the next millennium.
General Synod, which meets every three years, is the church's chief legislative and governing body. It is made up of bishops, clergy and lay people who have been elected to the task in each of the church's 30 Canadian dioceses.
Among the highlights of the gathering will be a forum on "nation and identity" featuring as panelist former Quebec Liberal leader Claude Ryan, and an address on the state of the church by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Canadian Primate.
The nation and identity forum, under the leadership of Montreal Bishop Andrew Hutchison, is meant to highlight unity issues as being of concern to all Canadians and to recognize the church's presence in the host city of Montreal.
Also among the members' tasks are to debate and pass resolutions on both the internal governance of the church and on a host of social issues and programs that the church is involved in or that it has taken a position on.
Delegates meeting at McGill University in Montreal, will, for instance, consider resolutions on:
- Issues related to euthanasia and assisted suicide;
- Issues related to cloning and reproductive biotechnologies;
- Closer relations of "full communion" between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada;
- The Multilateral Agreement on Investment;
- The place of indigenous peoples in the Anglican Church of Canada;
- Anglican identity: how Anglicans can effectively relate to each other in an increasingly complex and diverse society;
- Issues relating to human rights;
- Legislation dealing with the authority of bishops over priests.
Much of the nine-day gathering will consist of forums on various issues of concern to Canadian Anglicans. Among the topics to be addressed in these forums are the church's relationships with overseas partners, relations with other faiths and denominations, social justice issues, and relationships between the dioceses and the national church.
The last time General Synod met in 1995, it approved sweeping changes to the church's program, moving away from an emphasis on domestic work to one on building and developing overseas partnerships. This General Synod will review how that process has gone.
As well as Canadian delegates, several overseas partners also attend General Synod and participate in the deliberations. This time, these guests include Bishop French Chang-Him of the Diocese of Seychelles, Archbishop Glauco Soares de Lima, Primate of Brazil, Bishop Jubal Pereira Neves of the Diocese of Southwestern Brazil, Rev. Simea de Meldrum, the first woman ordained priest in the diocese of North Eastern Brazil and Rev. Andrew S'Zaw Lwin, a priest of the Church of the Province of Myanmar.
With about 750,000 active members, the Anglican Church of Canada is the country's third largest Christian denomination.
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Contact: Sam Carriere, Editor, Print Resources: 416-924-9199 ext. 256; Residence (416) 763-6592 email: scarriere@national.anglican.ca
Notes
Media representatives attending General Synod will have the use of a media room equipped with television monitoring the proceedings in the plenary hall. If you or your organization are interested in covering all or part of General Synod and you wish to reserve a "convening circular" (the agenda and all the supporting documents) or space in the media room, please contact Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Media Relations, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto ON, M4Y 2J6; Tel: (416) 924-9199 ext. 256; Fax (416) 968-7983; Email: scarriere@national.anglican.ca. The number of convening circulars is limited.
The General Synod agenda and background documents such as committee reports are also available through the Anglican Church of Canada's Web Site: www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 2.