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Eco Justice Committee #005-05-03

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8318
Date
2003 May 8-11
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-05-03
Date
2003 May 8-11
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-05-03
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Mr. David Watt
Prologue
Mr. Matthew Kett presented the report of the Eco-Justice Committee. Speaking to the issue of HIV/AIDS:
- PWRDF Executive Director, Mr. Andrew Ignatieff, told of the work of the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund in responding to the call from our partners in Africa. The Fund is also interested in working with aboriginal communities in Canada.
- Dr. Eleanor Johnson, Director Partnerships, reported that the General Synod Planning Committee had been approached to invite Stephen Lewis to speak at General Synod. The Partners in Mission Committee would like to bring the issue back to Canada and have parishes look at their response to the disease.
-The Rev. Canon Allen Box spoke of his work HOPE Africa, a social development wing of the Diocese of Capetown [i.e. Cape Town], and of the project he is involved in, which raises funds for a community in Africa where 40% of people are HIV sufferers.
-Bishop Barry Hollowell stressed that Council not forget the situation in Canada where the disease is on the increase, particularly in the prison system and in aboriginal communities. Our awareness and our ability to inform and keep information in front of people are imperative.
Text
That the Council of General Synod commend the HIV/AIDS document originating in Southern Africa for widespread distribution and action (see Appendix 1 of the PIMC Report to Council of General Synod).
It was noted that both EcoJustice and Partners-in-Mission recommended this motion.
Friendly Amendment
The mover and seconder agreed to add the words "and support the request of Partners in Mission for an educational session on HIV/AIDS at General Synod 2004" to the motion. The motion now reads
That the Council of General Synod commend the HIV-AIDS document originating in Southern Africa for widespread distribution and action (see Appendix 1 of the PIMC Report to Council of General Synod) and support the request of Partners in Mission for an educational session on HIV AIDS at General synod 2004" to the motion. CARRIED #20-05-03
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
AIDS (Disease) - Africa
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (37th : 2004 : St. Catharines, Ont.) - Agenda
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AIDS : meeting the challenge : data, facts, background

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog4750
Author
Weinreich, Sonja
Publication Date
c2004
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
RC 607 A26 W4 2004
Author
Weinreich, Sonja
Place
Geneva
Publisher
WCC Publications
Publication Date
c2004
Physical_Description
x, 118 p. ; 24 x 16 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Sonja Weinreich and Christoph Benn".
Originally published in German as: AIDS : Eine Krankheit verander die Welt : Daten, Fakten, Hintergrunde. Frankfurt: Verlag Otto Lembeck, 2003.
Includes bibliography: p. 110-118.
This book "is an offering to churches and the world -- a significant and vital addition to the continuum of knowledge -- that will greatly assist churches to be effective and efficient in the struggle to overcome HIV/AIDS. It is a compilation of historical, scientific and statistical material aimed at providing churches and their partners with a better understanding of the dynamics of HIV/AIDS as well as current information to aid in collaborative efforts at answering the challenge of the disease. .... On a practical level this response is deliberately multi-faceted and interactive, encouraging churches and Christian service organizations to build and support coalitions dedicated to overcoming this epidemic". -- Preface.
Contents: Preface / Samuel Kobia, General Secretary, World Council of Churches -- Introduction / Sonja Weinreich and Christoph Benn --.Natural history and HIV transmission -- Global, regional and country-specific spread of HIV/AIDS -- Vulnerable population groups -- Gender equity -- Children -- Young people -- Socio-economic context -- Stigma and discrimination --Human rights -- People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) -- Prevention -- Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) -- Care -- Antiretroviral therapy -- HIV/AIDS on the international agenda -- Advocacy and lobbying -- Culture and tradition -- Churches, theology and HIV/AIDS -- Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS -- Literature.
Added Entry
Benn, Christoph
World Council of Churches
Subjects
AIDS (Disease)
HIV infections
AIDS (Disease) - Statistics
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Christianity
HIV infections - Religious aspects - Christianity
ISBN
2-8254-1351-8
Call Number
RC 607 A26 W4 2004
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
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Residential schools, prisons, and HIV/AIDS among Aboriginal people in Canada : exploring the connections

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6948
Publication Date
2009
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
RA 643.86 C3 B37 2009
Place
Ottawa ON
Publisher
Aboriginal Healing Foundation
Publication Date
2009
Physical_Description
vi, 62 p. ; 28 x 21.5 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Prepared for the Aboriginal Healing Foundation by J. Kevin Barlow, Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network".
Includes bibliographical references, p. 57-62.
"This report describes some of these challenges. They will also help to understand that Survivors have needs, unique and above others in the Aboriginal population, yet they are still part of the people as a whole who have been impacted by a failed system [of residential schools]. These needs become compromised when new health issues such as HIV/AIDS or injection drugs come into play. HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination, including homophobia, make it all the more difficult to face and respond appropriately. And, when dealing with Aboriginal people who are or who have been in prison, this brings yet another level of healing needs that often goes unanswered. HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C are two of the newer health threats facing Aboriginal people today, especially those in prison. In exploring the connection between the residential school legacy and HIV/AIDS, this report focuses on incarcerated Aboriginal people because it is in the Canadian prison system that some of the most disturbing infection rates are found. Any person whose life path leads to prison has undoubtedly experienced a breakdown in the personal support systems and social networks that keep most people afloat. Prisons, like residential schools, are complete institutions. Far too many Aboriginal people are still spending portions of their lives in institutions where they have little control and are forbidden to leave". -- Intro.
Contents: Definitions -- Introduction -- Background -- The Residential School Legacy -- Understanding Physical and Sexual Abuse -- HIV/AIDS and Aboriginal People -- Aboriginal Offenders -- Other Concerns -- Best Practices and Challenges -- Conclusions -- Appendix 1: Background on the Healing Lodges -- Appendix 2: Interview Questions for Healing Lodges -- Appendix 3: Recommendations from the Literature -- References.
Series
Aboriginal Healing Foundation research series
Added Entry
Barlow, J. Kevin
Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Canada)
Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network
Subjects
Indigenous prisoners - Canada - Diseases
Indigenous prisoners - AIDS (Disease)
Indigenous peoples - Canada - AIDS (Disease)
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
ISBN
978-1-897285-78-7 (Print version)
Call Number
RA 643.86 C3 B37 2009
Location
General Synod Archives
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Anglicans reach out to people living with HIV/AIDS

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34270
Author
Paukov, Henrieta
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Michaelmas
Author
Paukov, Henrieta
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Michaelmas
Issue
123
Page
8-9
Notes
Article describes a number of AIDS related outreach projects operated within the diocese of Toronto for local populations and overseas in Africa. Includes the story of the Rev. Doug Willoughby, an Anglican priest who is himself HIV-positive and the diocese's involvement in the Philip Aziz Centre, a non-profit home hospice for people living with AIDS. Describes the work of The Teresa Group, founded by Penelope Holeton, an Anglican lay woman, to help children in Toronto living with AIDS, and also the fundraising work of St. Clement's, Eglinton, which has contributed to the work of the Stephen Lewis Foundation and which in August 2006 "held a reception for grandmothers from Kenya who [were] in Toronto for the International AIDS Conference and the Stephen Lewis Foundation's Grandmothers' Gathering".
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with AIDS patients - Anglican Church of Canada
Philip Aziz Centre (Toronto, Ont.)
Hospices (Terminal care) - Canada
Hospitality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Toronto
Willoughby, Doug
Graydon, Douglas (Douglas Norman)
Holeton, Penelope (Penelope Margaret Rathbone), 1941-2015
Teresa Group
AIDS (Disease) - Africa
Medcof, Alice (M. Alice), 1935-
Stephen Lewis Foundation
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Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Diana, Princess of Wales

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36884
Author
Chartres, Richard (Richard John Carew), 1947-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2007 [December]
Author
Chartres, Richard (Richard John Carew), 1947-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2007 [December]
Issue
127
[128]
Page
28
Notes
Sermon by the Bishop of London, the Rt. Rev. Richard Chartres, at the 10th anniversary service, held at the Guards Chapel, Westminster, to celebrate the life of the late Diana, Princess of Wales. "At a time when people are suspicious of rhetoric, the monarchy communicates by symbol and simple speech and the Princess brought her own gifts to this work. She was still only 26 when she shook the hand of a patient at the opening of the Middlesex Hospital's AIDS ward, the first in the UK. It is hard now to credit the degree of fear and prejudice which surrounded AIDS in the eighties. Those familiar with the field have no doubt that the Princess played a significant part in overcoming a harmful and even cruel taboo is a gesture which was not choreographed but sprang from a deep identification with those who were vulnerable and on the margin". "Her work in the very last year of her life for the victims of landmines also caught the popular imagination internationally and certainly accelerated the adoption of the Ottawa Convention, banning the use of weapon which disproportionately kills and maims women and children. She proved the eloquence of embrace and touch which of course have been used by royal healers through the centuries. And as she said 'the biggest disease today is not leprosy or TB but the feeling of being unwanted'." "Let this service mark the point at which we let her rest in peace and dwell on her memory with thanksgiving and compassion while we pray in the words of St. Paul for all those who serve our country as members of the Royal Family and most especially for the sons who were so precious to her".
Subjects
Diana, Princess of Wales, 1961-1997
AIDS (Disease) - Great Britain
Landmines
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