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Anglican diocese of the Arctic poised to elect church's first Inuk bishop

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official19
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO (May 25) -- The Anglican diocese of the Arctic is poised to make Canadian church history next week when it meets in Iqaluit to elect a new suffragan bishop.
To date, three men have been nominated, all of them Inuk. They are Rev. Ben Arreak of Pangnirtung, Canon Abeli Napartuk of Puvirtuq and Rev. Paul Idlout of Cape Dorset. If the diocesan synod, which meets May 27, elects one of them, he will become the first Inuk bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada.
(The Anglican church has two aboriginal bishops: Bishop Charles Arthurson, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Saskatchewan and Bishop Gordon Beardy, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Keewatin. Assistant bishops usually have responsibility for a specific geographic part of their diocese.)
The Arctic election on May 27 is to select a successor to Bishop Terrence Buckle, the previous assistant or suffragan bishop of the Arctic, who was recently elected Bishop of the Yukon.
Bishop Christopher Williams of the Arctic explained that under diocesan law, it is possible for nominations to be made up to 72 hours before the electoral synod begins its meeting.
The new bishop will be consecrated at St. Jude's Cathedral in Iqaluit on Sunday June 2.
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, Media Relations, General Synod, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Arreak, Ben (Benjamin)
Napartuk, Abeli
Idlout, Paul
Less detail

Amendment to the Declaration of Principles

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official792
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 149
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 149
Mover
Rt. Rev. J.R. Sperry
Seconder
Canon F.L. Dexter
Text
That First Reading be given to the amendment of Section 3e) of the Declaration of Principles by adding at the end thereof the following:
Provided also that a member of the Diocese of the Arctic appointed to serve in the diocesan office shall be eligible to be elected and to become and continue as a member of the General Synod while so serving. CARRIED ON FIRST READING Act 149
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Declaration
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - Membership
Less detail

(xxvii) Diocese of the Arctic

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9222
Date
1965 August 18 - 21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1965 August 18 - 21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Huron
Seconder
Bishop Greenwood [Assistant Bishop of Cariboo]
Prologue
The Primate requested the Bishop of the Arctic to present the contents of a pastoral which he had recently sent to all the people of his Diocese. The pastoral had been issued at the request of the Esquimaux people who desired the Bishop's opinion and advice on recent developments in the area of political responsibility for the Esquimaux people. The Bishop read the pastoral letter.
Text
"That the Secretary of the House of Bishops be asked to send a mimeographed copy of the pastoral letter of the Bishop of the Arctic to each member of the House of Bishops."
Notes
[Text of Pastoral Letter]
DIOCESE OF THE ARCTIC
153 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto 7. Ontario
May 28th, 1964
TO THE MISSIONARIES IN THE FIELD
Dear fellow workers:
I thought you would like to keep abreast of the very latest news regarding the Quebec situation. I am dictating this in Ottawa, so that you will have the very earliest possible news of the latest developments. I hardly need I hope place "Confidential' at the top of this.
After our Conference at Frobisher, as you will recollect, I went back home via Great Whale River. After I arrived back in Toronto, I read a great deal in the paper about the Government attitude towards the Eskimo question. The Government were I think forced into saying that they had no intention whatsoever of passing the Eskimos over to the authority of the New Quebec Government, without a Referendum being made to the Eskimo people, so that the Eskimos could make their own choice as to whether they wished to be under the control of Quebec or not. This I feel sure was really forced upon the Government. I don't think so much because they wished it, as it was because of the criticism of the Conservatives, especially Mr. Diefenbaker. Since this time, there has been a great deal of talk right across the country, and as you may imagine, the Government now is faced with several alternatives.
It could accede to the demands of Quebec or
It could find pressure being put upon it by opinion of Quebec as a whole quite apart from the Separatist movement.
There is I think growing in Quebec at the present time, (because of this Separatist movement) a movement to keep things on an even keel and it is to be hoped that present pressures will this be diminished. However, the main thing from the point of view of the Government, has been the tremendous pressure which has come from people all over Canada saying that they feel that the Government should consult the Eskimos and that none of the Eskimos should be forced into doing anything they do not wish to do in respect to this problem. Now this attitude has put a great deal of pressure on the Government and made the Government face up to some very unpleasant facts, for it is impossible for the Government to answer many of the problems, and one can understand and see this point of view.
It was while we were at the Conference at Frobisher Bay, that the Quebec Government suddenly got the idea of calling a Conference of the Eskimo top ranking people, together with representatives of the two Governments concerned. This they thought would enable the whole matter to be thrashed out. The Dominion Government refused to attend on the basis that this would be bargaining one against the other, and present an auction to the Eskimos. When the Federal Government refused, the Quebec Government decided to go ahead with the Eskimos first by calling a meeting to be held, as most of you will know, of representatives from all Eskimo settlements at Fort Chimo. It was later decided to have the meeting called for the Eskimo people alone but Mr. Gourdeau was adamant that he wanted Canon Clarke present at the meeting. He was also insistent that Father Lachat should be present. I don't know the exact reason for this, but as I pointed out to Mr. Gourdeau, I thought this was very unwise, as it would appear to the Eskimos that Father Lachat would represent the Quebec Government in that as you know, the Roman Catholics and the Quebec Government are one in the eyes of the Eskimos. I therefore pointed out that it would be rather foolish for him to bring in Father Lachat when Mr. Gourdeau wanted the Eskimos alone to discuss things quite apart from the Government. I had hoped and indeed it was my suggestion that the Eskimo people might themselves gather from all parts of Quebec and discuss those things which they thought necessary and decide on a common policy to be pointed out to the Quebec and Federal Governments.
I tried several times to get Canon Clarke on the long distance telephone, to talk to him about this, but was unable to do so. Eventually I received a wire from him saying that the meeting had been cancelled and that he would be telephoning me. (I have since received a tape, saying that the meeting was cancelled until July.)
I have since learned from Povungnetuk, that a meeting was held to find the representatives who were to go to Chimo. This was called when over 100 people were in Church and was called with a notice of five minutes, apparently to be sure that Father Steinman could get elected the head of the Co-op.
It is such tidings as this that make the Eskimo people mistrust those in authority in Quebec and those in authority in the Roman Catholic Church. I told Mr. Gourdeau about it !!
This brings you up to date until now, when I am in Ottawa.
Having been requested by the Deputy Minister of Northern Affairs to come to Ottawa to discuss the question of Churchill school and hostel, I took the opportunity to speak on the Quebec situation. Mr. Cote had promised that this would be discussed when I came to Ottawa, and so as I dictate this from Ottawa on the 21st May, it is immediately after I have had a meeting with the Assistant Deputy Minister, Mr. Gordon and Mr. Clare Bolger of the staff of Northern Affairs. The present situation is, that about three weeks ago, there was a discussion between the Department of Northern Affairs officials and Mr. Gourdeau of New Quebec, regarding the Eskimo take-over. It was proposed that the take-over should be over a period of five to seven years. This would mean that during this period both sides would expect and hope that things would work out so that the Eskimos came to understand and were willing to accept the take-over from Federal to Quebec control. A qualified take-over in the meantime, would gradually come into effect by Quebec Government workers working for Federal departments, and it was hoped that in one generation ahead, Quebec would be more acceptable to the Eskimo people. I pointed out that the situation in the North now, is more grave that it had been as far as the Eskimo people are concerned, and that they are still thinking of moving out, (and far more seriously now, than possibly they have done before) and that this was something that could not be ignored. However, the Department is quite adamant that they must do something. I feel that they don't know what to do, but what is worrying me is that they expect the Eskimos to accept a take-over sooner or later and I don't think they can back down from this stand. Personally, I think that it is inevitable sooner or later. Therefore, there is little point in upsetting the Quebec officials unless we can achieve something. So we have the Federal Government saying to Quebec, that in five or so years you can take over from us on certain conditions. Such an outlook of the Federal Government doesn't agree with press reports that the Eskimos be consulted. However, with my knowledge of the Eskimo people, they will not forget, for they are not like a lot of white people who will forget in time. I think you all should understand and know what is happening because of the implications within the country to the Eskimo people.
I had hoped that it would have been possible to have something definite from both Federal and Quebec Governments, but I think you can see that there is very little likelihood of our being able to put our fingers on anything definite, and I am wondering, because of this, whether we will be wise to have our meeting in July or whether it would not be wise to wait and see what develops.
I am sending this letter to you now, because I feel it is important that you understand the situation and what has taken place. It may be wise that we have our meeting in Northern Quebec later on, perhaps in the early part of the new year. I could make my Episcopal visit at the same time. Now I am thinking here not of you, but of our people and my inability at the present moment to put my finger on an answer to the peoples problems. I am not sure whether you will get this letter in time to think about it and give me a reply.
I am very perturbed by the fact that the Government feel that there is very little that it can say and this is why I suspect that they are not publicly making any statement. If they can they will avoid the issue and make no statement. If they say the wrong thing, I can understand it would be political suicide. I feel that there are many, many people in Quebec who are falling away from following Rene Levesque from his outlook and his policies, because they are extreme. This of course will not be without its effect upon the Federal Government and their decision. In any case I don't feel that we have very much to offer to the Eskimo people until some definite decision is made by the Federal Government.
In regard to the latest suggestion that the Quebec and Federal Governments should have officials working together and in each centre on the Quebec coast, and that they should work towards a take-over in five to seven years; I suggested that if this policy is taken that it would be wise for the Eskimos to elect one member from the community, who would talk and discuss all the problems with these two officials, and this would then mean that the Eskimos would understand all that was happening through this representative. If such an Eskimo representative were elected once a year, he could be re-elected only if the people were satisfied with him and his actions. This man could keep in close touch with the Government representatives, and this if handled carefully, might be the answer in getting the three sides to see each others point of view. This is the nearest I can come to a solution, or at least an offer of a solution to the problem. It by no means is going to solve the problem itself, but someone will have to give way, and I am not sure at the present moment on which side this can be,
I would like to have a visit with Mr. Gourdeau, but there seems to be very little to discuss at the present moment, and if we had a meeting in Northern Quebec, I doubt that there is much that we could profitably discuss with him. When he phoned me soon after I arrived back, I told him that we were hoping to have a meeting in the future some time in Northern Quebec, and wondered whether he would like to be with us. He said, not very enthusiastically, that he would.
This is the latest news on the present situation, and I will write again when events change and when I can get more information from Quebec, or from the Federal Government.
Yours sincerely,
[Donald B. Marsh]
Subjects
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Quebec (Province)
Inuit - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic - Pastoral letters and charges
Marsh, Donald Ben, 1903-1973
Indigenous peoples - Quebec (Province)
Nouveau-Quebec (Quebec)
Quebec (Province) - Politics and government - 1960-1976
Less detail

Lay Administration of Holy Communion (Eucharist by Extension)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1686
Date
1992 June 13-18
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1992 June 13-18
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop Williams
Seconder
Bishop Wood
Prologue
Bishop Williams said that, in the Arctic, there are fifty-one communities, twenty-one of which do not have a permanent priest. He said that it is very expensive and time consuming to get to these communities which started out as CMS projects having Eucharistic allowance many years ago. The parishes are demanding Eucharistic ministry more and more, and they are now looking at the possibility of locally raised clergy.
Text
That this House of Bishops requests the new Doctrine and Worship Committee to reconsider the question of the provision of regular sacramental ministry to communities where the ministry of a priest is not available except at infrequent intervals. Such consideration should include a study of the House of Bishops Guidelines of 1983 and the Form of Service produced by Doctrine and Worship for use on such occasions. CARRIED
Subjects
Lord's Supper - Anglican Church of Canada - Lay administration
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy
Less detail

Northern Development and Native Affairs

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1696
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 30
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 30
Mover
Rev. Canon J. Jeffries
Seconder
Rt. Rev. D.W. Hambidge
Text
"That this General Synod commends the National Program's Sub-Committee on Native Affairs for its past efforts and urges that it be restructured as follows: (i) any Diocese in which one-third or more of its Diocesan family are Native Canadian shall have the right to elect one Native representative to this Sub-Committee in a manner determined by the Diocese: (ii) The Diocese of The Arctic shall have the right to elect two Native Canadians to the Sub-Committee: (iii) The Primate shall appoint four Native members, and (iv) the Sub-Committee may co-opt up to six additional members."
CARRIED Act 30
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Sub-Committee on Native Affairs - Membership
Representation on committees - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Less detail

Primate's World Relief and Development Fund

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2525
Date
1980 March 19-21
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1980 March 19-21
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Dr. H. Riesberry
Seconder
Most Rev. E.W. Scott
Text
That a one-day consultation on the Anglican Church of Canada and its concerns about the Program to Combat Racism be held to bring together ten to twelve people drawn from NEC, the PWRDF Committees, the Program Committee, the World Mission Sub-Committee, the Sub-Committee on Native Affairs and the Council of the North. The purpose of the consultation is to prepare our delegates and give input to the PCR World Consultation in June 1980. CARRIED
Notes
Moved by: Rt. Rev. H.J.P. Allan
Seconded by: Rt. Rev. H. Hollis
That this National Executive Council request that the Bishop of The Arctic or his representative be invited to be present at this Consulation. CARRIED
Subjects
Racism - Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Less detail

[400th Anniversary of Anglican Clergy in Canada]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3161
Date
1978 August 14
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1978 August 14
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immedate release
Toronto -- August 14, 1978
Four hundred years ago this month a motley crew of English adventurers came ashore on what is now Baffin Island in the midst of their explorations for a northwest passage to the riches of the Orient. Their purpose? Of all things -- to hold a Church service !
It was the third expedition of Martin Frobisher, and, since one of its purposes was to establish a colony of 100 persons if possible, Frobisher had been instructed,
"That a minister or twoo do go in this jorney to use ministration of devyne service and sacraments, according to ye churche of England."
Therefore, Master Wolfal of the Diocese of Bath and Wells, scholar of King's College, ordained by the Bishop of London in April 1569 got the job -- and found himself on the barren northern shores of our country about to make history by celebrating the first Anglican Holy Eucharist in the New World.
He appears to have done well. Here is what the records tell us,
"Maister Wolfall on Winters Fornace (Baffin Island) preached a godly Sermon, whiche being ended, he celebrated also a Communion vpon the lande, at the partaking whereof, was the Captaine of the Anne Fraunces (Best himself) and manye other Gentlemen & Soldiers, Marrinters & Miners wyth hym. The celebration of diune mistery was ye first signe, seale & confirmation of Christes names death & passion euer knowen in all these quarters."
The service itself would have been taken from the Prayer Book of Queen Elizabeth I which had been issued in 1559.
To commemorate this historic event the Anglican Diocese of the Arctic will hold its Diocesan Synod at Frobisher Bay the last week in August this year [1978]. During the Synod a special Commemorative Holy Eucharist will be celebrated with the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev. Donald Coggan, as Preacher.
The Chief Celebrant at the Eucharist in St. Jude's Cathedral on Wednesday evening, August 30, will be the Rt. Rev. J.R. Sperry, Bishop of the Arctic. In addition to Dr. Coggan, other Church dignitaries attending will be, the Most Rev. E.W. Scott, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada; the Most Rev. F.H.W. Crabb, Archbishop of the Ecclesiastical Province of Rupert's Land; the Rt. Rev. G.F.C. Jackson, Bishop Ordinary of the Armed Forces; the Rev. Jens C. Chemnitz, Lutheran Bishop of Greenland and the Rev. Jean Dufour O.M.I., representing Roman Catholic Bishop O. Robidoux.
The Commissioner of the North West Territories, Commission S.M. Hodgson and the Federal Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Hugh J. Faulkner, will represent the two levels of Government in the North at the Service.
The Holy Eucharist this time, unlike its counterpart four centuries ago, will be largely in the Eskimo language and all English parts will be simultaneously translated.
- 30 -
If you require any further information, please contact:
Mr. Jerry Hames
600 Jarvis St.
Toronto M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192 ext. 305
or
The Diocese of the Arctic
1055 Avenue Road
Toronto M5N 2C8
(416) 481-2263
Subjects
Canada - Church history
Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Centennial celebrations, etc.
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Wolfall, Robert, d. 1610
Lord's Supper - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Frobisher, Martin, Sir, 1539-1594
Arctic regions - Discovery and exploration
Inuktitut language
Coggan, Donald (Frederick Donald), 1909-2000
Less detail

Memorials [from the Diocese of the Arctic]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3344
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Canon H.D. Whitbread
Seconder
Ven. J.R. Sperry
Prologue
Canon H.D. Whitbread presented the following Memorial from the Diocese of the Arctic:
"The Synod of the Diocese of The Arctic make presentation to General Synod that whenever possible meetings of General Synod be held outside the periods of Arctic Break-up and Freeze-up (late May to early July and early September to early January) in order that the elected representatives of the Diocese of The Arctic may be able to be present and take their place as duly elected delegates."
Text
That this Memorial be received with sympathy and referred to the National Executive Council. CARRIED Message L-16.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - Meetings
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - Timing of meetings
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Canada, Northern
Less detail

Bilingual Bishop - Diocese of the Arctic

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4187
Date
1973 May
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 83
Date
1973 May
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 83
Mover
Mr. B.T. Arreak
Seconder
Mr. P. Padlayat
Text
THAT this General Synod advise the Provincial Synod of Rupert's Land that the Eskimo delegates reported the feelings of the Eskimo people of the Diocese of the Arctic were that when the new Bishop is elected he should be a person able to speak the Eskimo language, and conversant with the culture and customs of the Eskimo people.
CARRIED IN BOTH ORDERS Act 83
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuktitut language
Christianity and culture - Anglican Church of Canada
Bilingualism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of the Committee on Organization

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4949
Date
1968 November 14-15
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1968 November 14-15
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Mr. G.C. Hodge
Seconder
Mr. D.H. Arnold
Text
That the General Secretary be asked to write to the Diocese of the Arctic regarding meetings of General Synod. CARRIED
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Government
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - Structure
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Less detail

[Plea to Strengthen and Support Training of Indian and Eskimo Peoples for the Ministry]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5127
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Archdeacon Donald Whitbread, a 22-year veteran in the Arctic, wants the Anglican Church of Canada to strengthen and support training of Indian and Eskimo peoples for the ministry.
It is likely the church will, because of a plea he made yesterday before the National Executive Council of the General Synod. The council's committee on ministry is charged with developing a plan for co-ordination and supervision.
"In the past 10 years 10 Eskimo priests have been ordained, and in the past 25 years about 25 Indians have been ordained in the whole of Canada," he said.
"That's nowhere good enough. I'm convinced that the program we are doing in the Diocese of the Arctic is badly needed in other parts of Canada among Indian peoples."
The Arctic operates a training school for Eskimos at Pangnirtung, 200 miles north of Frobisher and 10 miles south of the Arctic Circle. But it is not doing it alone. Two other dioceses, south of the Arctic but north of main population areas, are operating a school for Indian candidates - and doing it independently.
"There should be some coordination," he said. No diocese can afford to go it alone on projects like this, in this age of sharing our experiences, sharing our needs and sharing our problems."
"Hopefully," he said, "the church will develop an inter-diocesan group to co-ordinate studies and, perhaps, act as an accrediting board for the standards of native clergy training schools.",
In the Diocese of the Arctic, which stretches across the roof of Canada from the Yukon to the North Atlantic, 95 percent of the Anglican population are Eskimo-speaking. It's a standard that all clergy have to be bilingual to serve both the native people and the English-speaking communities. Of the 14,000 Eskimos, 10-11,000 are Anglican.
At Pangnirtung, nearly all lectures are given in Eskimo. The exceptions are couched in simple English.
"Bringing them south to college likely wouldn't work at this stage," he said. "The schools of theology are moving more and more to graduate work, and it would be too difficult for people with little formal education."
"They don't speak technically but, being adults, they can think very deeply in their own tongue. Theology and doctrine must be related to the everyday situations the person will meet, and church history must be meaningful from the person's culture and viewpoint."
Archdeacon Whitbread, who used to travel 2,000 miles a years by dogsled "to get around my parish," still flies 1,600 miles south to Montreal periodically to visit parishioners in hospital and bring the news from home.
- 30 -
For further information, contact:
Michael O'Meara, Director
Division of Communications
924-9192 (Bus.)
742-8327 (Res.)
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Theological education - Anglican Church of Canada
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Whitbread, Donald (Donald Henry), 1926-1978
Less detail

Report of Committee on Spiritual Advance A.A.A. (p.277)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6109
Date
1949 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1949 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Keewatin
Seconder
Bishop of Saskatchewan
Text
That the sincere thanks of the General Synod be conveyed to the Bishop of The Arctic, Chairman of the Spiritual Advance Committee of the A.A.A., and the Bishop of Huron, who on the illness of the chairman, took over the leadership of this committee and has rendered devoted and lasting service to the Church in its policy of Advance. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Anglican Advance Appeal. Committee on Spiritual Advance
Fleming, Archibald Lang, 1883-1953
Luxton, George N. (George Nasmith), 1901-1970
Less detail
Author
Beeson, Trevor (Trevor Randall), 1926-
Publication Date
2003 c2002
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 5176 B44 2002
Author
Beeson, Trevor (Trevor Randall), 1926-
Place
London
Publisher
SCM Press
Publication Date
2003 c2002
Physical_Description
248 p. ; 23.4 x 15.6 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Trevor Beeson".
"First published in 2002 by SCM Press. This paperback edition published in 2003". -- verso of t.-p.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
"The purpose of this book is twofold. It provides brief portraits of forty-eight bishops who were in office from about the time of the 1832 Reform Bill, when the Church of England as well as the nation as a whole entered a period of continuous change, until the final years of the twentieth century." -- Intro., p. [1].
Beeson "ends by asking why such able and interesting bishops are now in short supply and wonders whether the hectically busy managerial role assumed by the bishops of the new millennium represents a betrayal of the Episcopal office and a consequent weakening of the Church's witness in an incredibly secularized society. Looking not far ahead, the likely impact of women bishops is also discussed". -- back cover.
Contents: Acknowledgements / TB -- Introduction -- The aristocrats and the courtiers -- The scholars -- The statesmen -- The prophets -- The pastors -- The controversialists -- The headmasters -- The church reformers -- The social reformers -- The missionaries -- The evangelists -- The odd men out -- The pioneers : looking ahead -- Bibliography -- Index.
OTCH Note: The bishops described are in order of discussion: Edward Stuart Talbot, William Cecil, Charles Sumner, Cosmo Gordon Lang, Robin Woods, Connop Thirlwall, Joseph Barber Lightfoot, Mandell Creighton, Kenneth Kirk, Ian Ramsey, Archibald Campbell Tait, Randall Davidson, William Temple, George Bell, John Percival, Edward Lee Hicks, John A.T. Robinson, E.R. (Ted) Wickham, Edward King, William Walsham How, Edward Woods, Launcelot Fleming, Herbert Hensley Henson, Ernest William Barnes, Frederick Temple, George Ridding, Neville Gorton, Geoffrey Fisher, Edward Stanley, Charles James Blomfield, Samuel Wilberforce, Leslie Hunter, James Fraser, Brooke Foss Westcott, Charles Gore, George Augustus Selwyn, John William Colenso, Charles Mackenzie, Frank Weston, Joost de Blank, Arthur Foley Winnington-Ingram, Walter Carey, Christopher Chavasse, Cuthbert Bardsley, Henry Phillpotts, T.B. Strong, Mervyn Stockwood and Douglas Feaver.
Subjects
Church of England - Bishops
Bishops - England - History
Episcopacy - Church of England
Church of England - Bishops - Office
Bardsley, Cuthbert Killick Norman, 1907-1991
Barnes, Ernest William, 1874-1953
Bell, George Allen Kennedy, 1883-1958
Blomfield, Charles James, 1786-1857
Carey, Walter Julius, 1875-1955
Cecil, William (Rupert Ernest William Gascoyne), 1863-1936
Chavasse, Christopher Maude, 1884-1962
Colenso, John William, 1814-1883
Davidson, Randall Thomas, 1848-1930
de Blank, Joost, 1908-1968
Feaver, Douglas Russell, 1914-1997
Fisher, Geoffrey Francis, 1887-1972
Fleming, Launcelot (William Launcelot Scott), 1906-1990
Fraser, James, 1818-1885
Gore, Charles, 1853-1932
Gorton, Neville, 1888-1955
Henson, Hensley (Herbert Hensley), 1863-1947
Hicks, Edward Lee, 1843-1919
How, William Walsham, 1823-1897
Hunter, Leslie Stannard, 1890-1983
King, Edward, 1829-1910
Kirk, Kenneth Escott, 1886-1954
Lang, Cosmo Gordon (William Cosmo Gordon), 1864-1945
Lightfoot, Charles Barber, 1828-1889
Mackenzie, Charles (Charles Frederick Frazier), 1825-1862
Mandell, Creighton, 1843-1901
Percival, John, 1834-1918
Phillpotts, Henry, 1778-1869
Ramsey, Ian Thomas, 1915-1972
Ridding, George, 1828-1904
Robinson, John A.T. (John Arthur Thomas), 1919-1983
Selwyn, George Augustus, 1809-1878
Stanley, Edward, 1779-1849
Stockwood, Mervyn (Arthur Mervyn), 1913-1995
Strong, Thomas Banks, 1861-1944
Sumner, Charles Richard, 1790-1874
Tait, Archibald Campbell, 1811-1882
Talbot, Edward Stuart, 1844-1934
Temple, Frederick, 1821-1902
Temple, William, 1881-1944
Thirlwall, Connop, 1797-1875
Wickham, Ted (Edward Ralph), 1911-1994
Wilberforce, Samuel, 1805-1873
Westcott, Brooke Foss, 1825-1901
Winnington-Ingram, Arthur Foley, 1858-1946
Woods, Edward Sydney, 1877-1953
Woods, Robin (Robert Wilmer), 1914-1997
ISBN
0-334-02916-3
Call Number
BX 5176 B44 2002
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
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Visit plants seeds for stronger partnership

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article1320
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Partnership News
Date
1989 December
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Partnership News
Date
1989 December
Volume
2
Page
2
Notes
Concerning his visit to the Diocese of Carpentaria in Northern Australia, Bishop Sperry states that "the visit has been valuable in that it has enlarged my vision and helped me to understand that the two dioceses have so much in common and therefore so much to share."
Subjects
Anglican Church of Australia. Diocese of Carpentaria
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Sperry, John R. (John Reginald), 1927-2012
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"What is a wallaby doing on the cover of the Arctic News ?"

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article10727
Author
Dexter, Laurie
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Partnership News
Date
1992 Fall
Author
Dexter, Laurie
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Partnership News
Date
1992 Fall
Page
10-11
Notes
Excerpt from a report by Canon Laurie Dexter, Fort Smith, Diocese of the Arctic, on his trip to the Diocese of Carpentaria with the Rev. Joshua Arreak. Carpentaria is the companion diocese of the diocese of the Arctic.
Subjects
Companion diocese program - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Anglican Church of Australia. Diocese of Carpentaria
Australian aborigines - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Australia
Arreak, Joshua
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Arctic Stalwart Retires

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article21152
Author
Williams, Christopher (John Christopher Richard), 1936-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Arctic News
Date
1996 Spring - Summer
Author
Williams, Christopher (John Christopher Richard), 1936-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Arctic News
Date
1996 Spring - Summer
Page
12-13
Notes
The Very Rev. Michael Gardener has retired after forty-one years of faithful service to the Diocese of the Arctic. He was the first principal of the ATTS [Arthur Turner Training School] and until his retirement, dean of the cathedral.
Subjects
Gardener, Michael (Michael George)
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Arthur Turner Training School (Pangnirtung, N.W.T.)
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Ajuerktuejee from the South

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article22581
Author
Brandley, Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Arctic News
Date
1997 Summer
Author
Brandley, Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Arctic News
Date
1997 Summer
Page
13-14
Notes
In his mid forties, Mike Shouldice has become one of an honourable line of Arctic-appointed deacons in the Anglican Church. Article provides history of missionary work with the Inuit.
Subjects
Shouldice, Mike
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Inuit - Anglican Church of Canada
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Anglicans celebrate the birth of Nunavut

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article27203
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Update [Anglican Appeal]
Date
1999 Summer
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Update [Anglican Appeal]
Date
1999 Summer
Volume
6
Issue
2
Page
4
Notes
The territory of Nunavut which came into being on 1 April 1999 lies within the Anglican diocese of the Arctic. Many of the new territories 27,000 people (of whom 85 % are Inuit) are also active Anglicans. The Very Rev. Roger Briggs, dean of the Arctic, notes that two recently ordained deacons include one, the Rev. Mike Ferris, who is now a deputy minister in the Nunavut government. "Nunavut is the culmination of a dream: an Inuit homeland where self-determination and self-government are now a reality".
Subjects
Nunavut Territory
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Inuit - Canada
Inuit - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Briggs, Roger
Ferris, Michael, 1943-2011
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Challenge: Come North of 60 to minister (& learn)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33264
Author
Dixon, Geoffrey
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Planet
Date
2006 March
Author
Dixon, Geoffrey
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Planet
Date
2006 March
Volume
2
Issue
3
Page
3
Notes
The Rev. Geoffrey Dixon worked in the Diocese of the Arctic for 16 years and then spent 7 years in the Diocese of the Yukon. He writes about ministry in the North.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Canada, Northern - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Salaries, etc.
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
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