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Proposed new hymn book draws mixed reviews

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2
Date
1995 June 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA -- (June 7) Anglicans meeting at their General Synod have expressed strong views on a proposed new hymn book which presents female imagery of God, inclusive language and a more extensive range of musical styles.
The 300-member body will decide later this week whether the book will be published.
George Black, chair of the Hymn Book Task Force, said the group tried to reflect "a collection of diverse voices" in the new book and to include new material on subjects which have been under-represented in previous hymnals, such as justice and peace issues, environmental issues and the call to ministry.
Some speakers at the General Synod hearing expressed strong reservations about proceeding with a new hymn book in a time of financial constraints, when the church already has two.
Some objected to the removal of old familiar hymns or to proposed changes to them.
Others, however, applauded the Task Force's emphasis on hymns with inclusive language and the proposed book's more modern style in both music and text.
Although most of the 682 hymns in the proposed book retain well-loved, traditional tunes, the task force has added material from a broad range of musical styles from countries around the world.
Not included in the book are traditional Christian hymns which use the imagery of war, such as Onward Christian Soldiers.
The task force said that hymns which spoke of the struggle against evil were still considered appropriate while hymns which suggested that war itself was positive were dropped from the new book.
The Anglican Church of Canada currently has two official hymn books -- the "blue" book published in 1938 and the "red" hymn book produced in 1971.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Hymns - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Hymn Book Task Force
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Praise. 1998
Church music - Anglican Church of Canada
War - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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New editor for Anglican Journal

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3
Date
1995 October 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 October 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, October 16, 1995 -- The Reverend David Harris, an editor with the Halifax Chronicle-Herald, has been named Editor of the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Harris, who holds an MA in theology from Oxford University, became a reporter with the Chronicle-Herald in May, 1987, and a general editor in April 1991. Recently, he was appointed to the Chronicle-Herald's regular page one team.
In November 1994 Harris was appointed religion editor for the Chronicle-Herald and its sister publication, the Mail-Star. In the words of a colleague, "he transformed the religion page through his personal initiative and vision, to make it more engaging and responsive to its community."
Harris believes a similar approach will aid the Journal, which he praises for its attempt to be well-rounded and broadly representative of the church. "I think editorially it can become even broader," he said and in style and design I think it can be more focussed and reader-friendly."
Harris was in training for ordained ministry a decade ago but moved instead into journalism. In June of this year, he was ordained into a "non-stipendiary" (unpaid) position with All Saints Cathedral, Halifax. He has served the Diocese of Nova Scotia in several capacities, including a potentially divisive role as chair of an independent review committee on the diocesan newspaper. The committee was established after a dispute erupted over the paper's role. Harris' leadership in addressing the dispute has drawn praise from all sides.
Harris, 36, is married to the Reverend Dawn Davis, priest assistant at the Cathedral. He will commence his new duties on January 15, 1996, succeeding Michael McAteer who has been the interim editor of the Journal since June.
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Harris, David
Anglican Journal / Journal Anglican
Anglican Journal. Editor
Religious newspapers and periodicals - Anglican Church of Canada
Editorial independence
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Anglican Church affirms presence and contributions of gay men and lesbians

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4
Date
1995 June 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 8) -- The Anglican Church of Canada's governing General Synod has affirmed the presence and contributions to the church of gay men and lesbians and condemned bigotry, violence and hatred directed against people because of their sexual orientation.
After a passionate, four-hour debate, the General Synod also strongly endorsed three other resolutions arising out of the report of a Task Force on Homosexuality and Homosexual Relationships, struck three years ago.
- The Synod urges parishes and diocese to "continue, deepen and adapt" the learning and dialogue on homosexuality and homosexual relationships throughout the church, and;
- Urged the Primate to encourage dialogue on homosexuality and homosexual relationships throughout the church, and;
- Asked the church's bishops to indicate whether they are or intend to review sexuality guidelines they formulated in 1979. (The guidelines say the church will not bless same-sex unions and that homosexual people may be ordained but must remain celibate.)
Most of the debate at General Synod centred on the first recommendation -- the affirmation of the presence and contributions of gay men and lesbians.
Some Synod members felt that the church would do an injustice to its members by affirming the contributions of some, but not all.
Other Synod members said they could support the language of the resolution despite concerns about appearing to sanction homosexuality. "This does not commit me to condoning homosexual behavior, nor does it change the doctrine of the church," one Synod member said.
Before approving the Task Force resolutions, Synod defeated several amendments aimed at broadening the affirmation or at being much more general by affirming all Christians regardless of sexual orientation.
One speaker said he opposed broadening the resolution because "that removes the names of the people we are talking about and my understanding of Christian tradition is that names are very important."
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Parties and movements
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Homosexuality and Homosexual Relationships
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Anglican Award of Merit

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Merv Bater of Winnipeg in the diocese of Rupert's Land, has been awarded the Anglican Award of Merit by the church's National Executive Council.
Mr. Bater has been co-ordinator of the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund in Rupert's Land since 1985 and is currently chair of the regional sub-committee for Latin America, the Caribbean and Canadian projects.
He is also a member of the Anglican Task Force on Ecumenical Coalitions and was the Anglican representative at the North American Consultation for Development Educators in Niagara Falls in 1988.
Mr. Bater was a member of the national Stewardship and Financial Development Committee between 1986 and 1989.
The Anglican Award of Merit is given to lay people who have made an outstanding contribution to the church, either nationally or internationally, over several years or who have performed work nationally or internationally over a short term that has had a significant impact on the church.
National Executive Council, also approved making the award to Madeline Critchell of the diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador and to Ian McCulloch of the diocese of Nova Scotia.
The awards will be presented by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Award of Merit
Bater, Merv
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Anglican Award of Merit

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Ian McCulloch of Chester, N.S., a solicitor for General Synod between 1985 and 1994 and chancellor of the Ontario Provincial Synod since 1988, has been awarded the Anglican Award of Merit by the church's National Executive Council.
Mr. McCulloch served on several committees of General Synod and departments of the national church. He participated in several church courts, provided legal assistance to the Inculturation and Finance Department and served on the board of directors of Anglican Foundation for twenty years.
He retired in 1994 and moved from the diocese of Huron to Nova Scotia.
The Anglican Award of Merit is given to lay people who have made an outstanding contribution to the church, either nationally or internationally, over several years or who have performed work nationally or internationally over a short term that has had a significant impact on the church.
National Executive Council, also approved making the award to Madeline Critchell of the diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador and to Merv Bater of the diocese of Rupert's Land.
The awards will be presented by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Award of Merit
McCulloch, Ian
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No prayer book revision for six years, commission urges, but new eucharistic rites are needed as soon as possible

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8
Date
1995 March 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Toronto, March 3, 1995 -- After four years of research and study, an Anglican commission charged with evaluating the church's Book of Alternative Services (BAS) says there should be a new book -- but not yet.
However, the commission also calls for a supplementary resource to be produced as soon as possible. The supplement would incorporate a contemporary language eucharistic rite which is inclusive in its language and imagery about God; a rite which would allow local communities to include native spiritual traditions; a French language rite; and other services.
At the same time, the commission upholds the current status of the church's Book of Common Prayer now and in the future.
The evaluation commission was set up to examine the extent to which the BAS was in use across the country, its suitability for worship, and the extent to which it reflects Anglican theology.
The commission's report is at pains to recognize the tremendous importance which Anglicans place on worship, and it says any changes must be handled with great sensitivity and an openness to diversity.
People outside the church might scratch their heads in wonderment at the fuss. But the Anglican Church is defined, as much as anything, by its liturgy -- the formal rituals through which it gathers in worship. Small wonder then that the 1985 Book of Alternative Services, which provides more contemporary language for worship than the church's more traditional Book of Common Prayer, was controversial when it was introduced.
Today, the evaluation commission finds the book is in widespread use across Canada, though it notes the frequency and extent of BAS usage increases from east to west. The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) also remains in use, and most people are satisfied with the pattern of usage for both books.
Theologically, the commission says the BAS reflects an orthodox understanding of the Christian faith, but it is difficult to measure the book against "Anglican theological tradition" because that tradition is diverse and not limited to one definition.
Commission members were chosen to reflect theological competence and wide range of theological views, and they say the church "must achieve a balance between uniformity and diversity in its liturgical texts." But they reject calls by some for a single new prayer book to include elements from both the BCP and the BAS. They say both books should continue in use for another six years, then a commission should undertake a full revision of the BAS. The BCP would also continue to be available.
Meanwhile, a supplement to the BAS should be produced to meet several expressed needs, including what commission members refer to as two "unfinished conversations: native spiritual traditions and language about God.
"Both are points of acute conscience in the contemporary church," the commission's report notes." It says the church needs to experiment with listening to culture and innovation, along with critical reflection.
The commission also calls for the creation of a "theological commission ... representative of the diversity of theological opinion in the church, with the task of encouraging and promoting theological discussion in the church."
The evaluation commission's final report will be distributed later this month to members of the church's General Synod, who will consider its recommendations when they meet in June, 1995. Additional copies are available from the Anglican Book Centre.
The evaluation commission members are: Bishop Eric Bays, Regina (Diocese of Qu'Appelle; chair); Bishop Walter Asbil, Hamilton (Diocese of Niagara); Canon Dorothy Barker, Castlegar (Diocese of Kootenay); the Rev. Helen Belcher, Calgary (Diocese of Calgary); Canon David Boston, Halifax (Diocese of Nova Scotia); David Hall, Gander (Diocese of Central Newfoundland); Bishop George Lemmon, Fredericton (Diocese of Fredericton); Bishop Victoria Matthews, Toronto (Diocese of Toronto); Professor Terence Penelhum, Calgary (Diocese of Calgary); Ronald Stevenson, Fredericton (Diocese of Fredericton); the Rev. Murray Still, Craik (Diocese of Qu'Appelle); Professor John Webster, Toronto (Diocese of Toronto).
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Alternative Services Evaluation Commission
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Alternative Services
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Prayer
Anglican Church of Canada - Prayer-books and devotions - History and criticism
Liturgy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Liturgy - Texts - History and criticism
Liturgical renewal - Anglican Church of Canada
Lord's Supper (Liturgy) - Anglican Church of Canada - Texts
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Native spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's Theological Commission
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Embracing the `strangers'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9
Date
1995 February 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 February 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention: Diocesan Editors
What riches can be found in cultural diversity ?
Since the last General Synod, 17 Anglican parishes, from the Maritimes to British Columbia, have made a concerted effort to answer that question. For at least one parish, diversity has been a key to survival and growth. Several others have been forced to confront the "darker side" of multiculturalism -- racism and prejudice. To recognize that the problem exists and to begin to talk about it is often half the battle, they have found.
InterMission looks at the three-year-old Multicultural Parishes Project in April.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
InterMission
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Multicultural Parishes Project
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Where did they ever begin ?

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official10
Date
1995 March 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention : Diocesan Editors
For three years, a group called the Beginners has been working on a strategic plan to plot a future course for General Synod. Where did they start ? What kinds of things did they think about ? What principles guided them ?
In May, InterMission looks at the work the Beginners did through the eyes of one of them, Kathleen McLaughlin. Ms. McLaughlin, 29, was the youngest of the group, a management consultant with degrees in theology, business and electrical engineering, whose time was donated to the church by the high-powered firm of McKinsey and Company.
The whole concept of strategic planning, she says, is firmly rooted in the Bible. Even Jesus did it.
InterMission is a page prepared monthly by the Communications Department of General Synod and published in the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
Beginners
Strategic planning - Anglican Church of Canada
McLaughlin, Kathleen
InterMission
Less detail

The do's and don'ts of advocacy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official11
Date
1995 May
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 May
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention : Diocesan Editors
The proposed strategic plan which goes to General Synod this month places a high priority on the church advocating for social justice.
How can this be done effectively ?
Experts on advocacy say that the church can have a voice in the corridors of power, but that the way advocacy has been practiced in the past may not be the most effective way to go about it.
In June, InterMission looks at advocacy -- how the church has done it in the past, and how it might approach it in the future.
InterMission is a page prepared monthly by the Communications Department of General Synod and published on the inside back cover of the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Contact Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199 ext. 256 or Doug Tindal, Director of Communications 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Lobbying - Canada
InterMission
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General Synod to chart Anglican church's future

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official12
Date
1995 April 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 April 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(TORONTO, April 19) -- The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada meets at Carleton University in Ottawa in June to chart a course of action that will determine how the church will look and work as it approaches the third millennium.
The Anglican Church decided at its last General Synod in 1992, to launch a strategic planning process aimed at determining how best the church can expend its energy and resources. Declining revenues at the national level forced a series of reductions in staff and program in 1993 and 1994, but the planning process has continued. The outcome of that process will now be before General Synod when it convenes at Carleton University in Ottawa June 1-9.
General Synod is the Anglican Church of Canada's chief governing body. It has more than 300 members, including representatives of the orders of bishops, clergy and laity.
Other issues synod members are expected to tackle include the following:
- A study on homosexuality initiated at the last General Synod in 1992
- Acknowledging the wrongs done to native people in church-run residential schools, and looking to a new relationship with native Anglicans
- The production of a new Hymn Book to blend modern and traditional hymns
- An evaluation of the Book of Alternative Services, a modern prayer book introduced in 1985
General Synod will welcome as a special guest and speaker the Rt. Rev. Dinis Sengulane of Mozambique, an inspiring leader and winner of an all-Africa peace price for his instrumental role in ending Mozambique's civil war.
If you or your organization wish accreditation to General Synod, it is important that you contact us now, since space in the plenary hall and the media room is limited. Accreditation will also ensure that a full set of documents (called the Convening Circular) will be reserved for you.
For accreditation or further information, contact Vianney (Sam) Carriere, General Synod Communications, or use the attached Media Registration Form [not included in electronic database].
Contact Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Media Relations, General Synod 416-924-9199, ext. 256; FAX: (416) 968-7983 Sam_Carriere@ecunet.org
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Anglicans face hard decisions on a host of issues

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official13
Date
1995 May 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 May 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Toronto (May 15, 1995) -- The 34th General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada at Carleton University in Ottawa next month will be a mixture of pageantry, reflection and hard decisions about the future of the church.
General Synod is the Anglican church's chief governing body. It meets every three years and is made up of more than 300 members, including bishops, clergy and laity.
Among the crucial decisions to be made in Ottawa, from June 1 to 9, are the adoption of a strategic plan which will determine how the church will look and work going into the 21st century.
Reports will also be presented on native residential schools, homosexuality, the production of a revised hymn book and on an assessment of the Book of Alternative Services, the church's modern prayer book.
Anticipated daily highlights include the following:
- June 1 (Thursday): Opening address by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate; Presentation of coat of arms, flag and badge by Governor General Romeo LeBlanc.
- June 2 (Friday): Presentation to General Synod of "Preparing the Way" -- the church's priorities for the next decade.
- June 3 (Saturday): Presentation by the Council for Native Ministries, including a proposal for forming an autonomous native church.
- June 4 (Sunday): Synod members spend Sunday morning in local area parishes; Bishop Dinis Sengulane, recipient of an All-Africa peace prize for his role in ending the war in Mozambique, preaches at a late-afternoon service.
- June 5 (Monday): Decision on the strategic plan; Hearing on a proposal for a new hymn book; Hearing on homosexuality with a recommendation that the church continue its study, "Hearing Diverse Voices, Seeking Common Ground".
- June 6 (Tuesday): Implications on the new strategic plan; Reflections on the church's involvement with native residential schools.
- June 7 (Wednesday): Resolutions.
- June 8 (Thursday): Resolutions.
- June 9 (Friday): Closing Eucharist.
General Synod will also be attended by several partners and observers, including Bishop Dinis Sengulane of Lebombo, Mozambique; Laura Ocampo of the National Council of Churches in the Philippines; Anivaldo Padilha, a Brazilian sociologist; and Sally Bucklee of the U.S. Episcopal Church.
Media representatives interested in covering all or most of General Synod should request accreditation in advance, as space is limited in both the plenary hall and the news room. Accreditation will also ensure that a full set of General Synod documents is reserved for each journalist.
Contact Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Media Relations, General Synod, 416-924-9199, ext. 256; FAX: 416-968-7983 sam_carriere@ecunet.org
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Mozambique bishop urges Canadians to denounce gun ownership

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official14
Date
1995 June 5
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 5
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Ottawa (June 5) -- Anglican Bishop Dinis Sengulane of the Diocese of Lebombo in Mozambique has urged Canadians to denounce gun ownership and the shipment of arms to war-torn countries.
Speaking to the 400 members of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Ottawa, Bishop Sengulane said individuals and countries involved in arms production should take responsibility for the long-term effects of their actions.
"More than one million people have been killed in Mozambique over the last 10 years by weapons produced elsewhere in the world," he said. "I would like these people who produce guns to come to the grave sites of our dead. I would like them to visit our orphans. Maybe then they would realize the impact that their products have on others."
Bishop Sengulane who served as president of the Peace and Reconciliation Committee of the Christian Council of Mozambique, is internationally-known for his role in bringing about a negotiated cease-fire in Mozambique. In 1992 he received the First Peace Prize of the All Africa Conference of Churches and the following year he was awarded an international peace prize from the Diakonia of Sweden.
Bishop Sengulane called on Canadians to set an example by refusing to own guns for purposes other than hunting. "Once you own a gun it sends a message that killing is acceptable," he said.
He also urged Canadians not to purchase toy guns or other weapons for their children. "Education starts within the family," he said. "We have to teach children, here in Canada and around the world, to use their skills and imagination in a way that will be productive, not destructive to humanity".
Bishop Sengulane is a guest at the General Synod of the Anglican Church, meeting June 1 to 9 in Ottawa. He preached at a Sunday service at Christ Church Cathedral.
- 30 -
Contact Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular 613-720-1468
Subjects
Sengulane, Dinis
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Arms transfers - Canada
Arms transfers - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arms transfers - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Gun control - Canada
Gun control - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
War toys - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Anglican Church approves new strategic plan that stresses consultation, overseas partnerships

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official15
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA -- (June 6) The Anglican Church of Canada has approved a new strategic plan that refocuses where it will spend its energy and calls for new ways for church members to work together, stressing consultation and networking rather than legislation.
Called "Preparing the Way" the church's plan is itself the result of an extensive three-year-long consultation process that involved church members from across the country at all levels. The plan was approved by the church's 300-member General Synod, including lay members, clergy and bishops, meeting in Ottawa this week.
Under the strategic plan, the church's national organization will concentrate its resource on nurturing and building overseas partnerships and on advocacy for social justice issues. It will also work at developing ecumenical relationships with other churches and on clarifying Anglican identity, liturgy and worship.
The plan also reaffirms the church's commitment to its northern dioceses and pledges to help those dioceses work towards financial self-sufficiency.
Much of the domestic work that the national church has been involved in in the past, such as congregational development and stewardship education, will now be the responsibility of the 30 dioceses, on the principle that local work is best done locally.
The plan calls for a restructuring of the church's national organization with a view to reducing the number of national committees and boards that have traditionally overseen the Anglican Church's work.
This will not only be a cost-saving measure, but will free funds for the church to devise ways of meeting and working that stress consultation rather than legislation, according to plan.
The church's new structure will stress flexibility, responsiveness, trust and consultation. It also calls for new ways of working together through cross-country networks and a greater use of electronic communications.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Strategic planning - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Government
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Anglican Church commends work on healing for those abused at native residential schools

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official16
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 6) -- The 300-member General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada responded enthusiastically to a report commending further work on the process of healing and reconciliation for former students of Native residential schools.
General Synod, meeting in Ottawa this week, heard a summary of the work done by a Residential Schools Working Group created three years ago by the Anglican Church to address the needs of Aboriginal people who suffered physical, emotional, sexual and cultural abuse in the government-funded schools. Between 1820 and 1969 hundreds of thousands of Aboriginal children were placed in residential schools administered by Christian denominations.
The Residential Schools Working Group recommended to General Synod that its work, which has included the development of educational resources, government submissions and grants for support programs for victims of abuse, continue under the auspices of the church's Council for Native Ministries, whose members are Native Anglicans.
Angeline Ayoungman, co-chair of the working group, said the church must work to continue the healing which began at the Native Convocation in 1993, when Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, apologized to Aboriginal peoples on behalf of the church.
"We've come a long way, but we have a long way to go before the healing and reconciliation is complete," said Ms Ayoungman. She said it may take several generations before the impact of residential schools, manifested in high levels of alcoholism, drug abuse and suicide among native communities, can be fully resolved.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Indian residential schools - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indian residential schools - Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Residential Schools Working Group
Anglican Church of Canada. Council for Native Ministries
Healing - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
Less detail

Homosexuality hearing reflects diverse views among Anglican Church members

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official17
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 6) -- A hearing on homosexuality at the Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod in Ottawa brought a host of calls for tolerance and love of those who are different and only a few assertions that homosexuality is wrong and ought to be condemned.
The hearing was held in the context of the report of a task force struck by the last General Synod three years ago. The report commends the contributions made by gay people to the church, but calls for an extension and deepening of study and dialogue before the church takes any other action. The report will be voted on later this week.
For the first time in an Anglican Church Synod, church members at three urban locations -- Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver -- got the chance to watch their chief governing body in action. A live satellite feed brought the 90-minute Ottawa forum to those locations, where panels assembled to continue the discussion afterwards.
When it was created three years ago, the Task Force on Homosexuality, was asked to produce a study guide around the issue of homosexuality, which was eventually published under the title "Hearing Diverse Voice, Seeking Common Ground".
The study guide's title would also have been appropriate for the synod hearing. Participation in the hearing, under the rules of General Synod, was limited to Synod members and accredited guests. The discussion was sometimes passionate, sometimes heated, sometimes humorous.
Rev. George Porter, a member of the Task Force, said the issue of homosexuality "is not just hot potatoes, but boiled, scalloped and mashed potatoes and anyone speaking on those issues risks the same fate." He urged Synod members to wrestle with sexuality issues "with open minds, but not open heads".
William Sibley, Superior of the Anglican Order of the Holy Cross, noted that the discussion of homosexuality had been going on for more than 20 years.
"How long, oh Lord ?" he asked. "It is time," he added, to "stop hiding behind Scripture and deal with the ethics of reality. The church is crucifying people. The blood of (murdered homosexual priest) Warren Eling is on the hand of the House of Bishops and on the hands of General Synod and on my hands because I couldn't do better."
Another speaker, however, George Egerton of Vancouver, replied that 20 years in the life of the church is very little.
Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate, said he began meeting homosexual people and hearing their stories 20 years ago, when the House of Bishops started studying homosexuality. "Many of them spoke of how they had always known of their orientation as part of their fundamental being," he said. "Even before they could name it or discuss it, they knew it. I believed that then and I believe it now."
Bishop Michael Ingham of New Westminster diocese said that in some ways, gay people typify the history of the church. "Gay people have modeled to us what it is like to die and live again," he said. "And yet they are with us still."
One of the most eloquent pleas for tolerance of people who are different came from Pamela Klym, a youth delegate from the diocese of Caledonia in British Columbia.
Miss Klym said she feels that homosexuality is wrong. "But it is possible to love every person. That doesn't mean that we have to agree with all that they stand for and all that they do."
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Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ordination of gays - Anglican Church of Canada
Eling, Warren (John Warren), 1939-1993
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Homosexuality and Homosexual Relationships
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Personal involvement of Chretien, Harcourt needed to resolve Nisga'a talks deadlock, Archbishop says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official18
Date
1995 July 18
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 July 18
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, July 18, 1995 -- The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada is urging Prime Minister Jean Chretien and British Columbia Premier Michael Harcourt to break the impasse in the Nisga'a Treaty negotiations.
"The time has come for the exercise of political will. Otherwise the negotiations will end up being held hostage to short-term political interests," said Archbishop Michael Peers.
"I call upon the Prime Minister and the Premier to become personally involved in this. They must not allow these talks to perish. We need our political leaders to exercise the statesmanship which they have previously demonstrated. We cannot allow First Nations to believe that, having negotiated in good faith, their treaties will be sacrificed to federal-provincial bickering."
Last week talks between the federal and provincial negotiators and the Nisga'a Tribal Council from north western British Columbia broke down when the two governments could not resolve a disagreement about a funding formula. The breakdown occurred on the very day that the British Columbia government had set as an extended deadline for all sides to announce the terms and progress of negotiations.
"The Nisga'a have conducted themselves at the bargaining table in a patient and responsible manner. It is not responsible for governments to walk away now because they cannot agree between themselves," said Archbishop Peers. "The time is now, for the sake of future generations, to say we can and will solve these differences. Otherwise it will seem desperate for many First Nations people, and they may very well come to believe once again that `justice delayed is justice denied It will be tragic if that becomes the only outcome of these negotiations."
The Anglican Church of Canada, at the meeting of 34th General Synod held in Ottawa in June, expressed its will about these negotiations in a resolution that urges both the government of Canada and British Columbia "to bring forward proposals that will provide a land and resource base sufficient to assure self determination for the Nisga'a people ... and to settle all outstanding native land claims in a just and expedient manner."
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Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Indians of North America - British Columbia - Claims
Indians of North America - British Columbia - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Claims
Indians of North America - Canada - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Nishga Indians
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Chretien, Jean
Harcourt, Michael
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Anglican diocese of the Arctic poised to elect church's first Inuk bishop

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official19
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO (May 25) -- The Anglican diocese of the Arctic is poised to make Canadian church history next week when it meets in Iqaluit to elect a new suffragan bishop.
To date, three men have been nominated, all of them Inuk. They are Rev. Ben Arreak of Pangnirtung, Canon Abeli Napartuk of Puvirtuq and Rev. Paul Idlout of Cape Dorset. If the diocesan synod, which meets May 27, elects one of them, he will become the first Inuk bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada.
(The Anglican church has two aboriginal bishops: Bishop Charles Arthurson, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Saskatchewan and Bishop Gordon Beardy, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Keewatin. Assistant bishops usually have responsibility for a specific geographic part of their diocese.)
The Arctic election on May 27 is to select a successor to Bishop Terrence Buckle, the previous assistant or suffragan bishop of the Arctic, who was recently elected Bishop of the Yukon.
Bishop Christopher Williams of the Arctic explained that under diocesan law, it is possible for nominations to be made up to 72 hours before the electoral synod begins its meeting.
The new bishop will be consecrated at St. Jude's Cathedral in Iqaluit on Sunday June 2.
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, Media Relations, General Synod, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Native bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Arreak, Ben (Benjamin)
Napartuk, Abeli
Idlout, Paul
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Primate urges continued prayer for Quebec in aftermath of referendum : a statement to Canadian Anglicans By Archbishop Michael Peers

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official20
Date
1995 October 31
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 October 31
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, October 31, 1995
The Quebec referendum is neither a victory for federalism nor a defeat for sovereignty. It is perhaps a victory for Canada, but only if the vote is seen, not as an ending, but as the potential for new beginnings.
In the past several days I have heard from Anglicans across Canada. Tens of thousands have gathered to pray about this referendum day. These have not been prayers for a specific result. They have been simple prayers of support for the people of Quebec as they face their decision.
The Anglican Church has been part of this land for almost 300 years under many different political structures. The church stands for communion and unity in Christ, and it will continue to do so in the days to come.
I ask Anglicans to continue their prayers for all the people of Quebec in the weeks ahead. The church will continue to seek unity in Christ and reconciliation among both those who celebrate and those who grieve this decision. I call on all Anglicans to seek opportunities for reconciliation.
Let us also pray that the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec may show wisdom and moderation. The referendum has set the path of future negotiations, but it has not resolved them.
The months and years ahead will be times of difficult and emotional negotiations. It is a time for us to express our deep care for our society by praying earnestly, by involving ourselves individually wherever possible in dialogue, as well as in the political process. Let us support one another and pray for wisdom in our political leaders as we attempt together to discern new and life-giving partnerships in this northern land.
My prayer is that God's Spirit will lead us toward a just and peaceful community. I pray that the people of Quebec, the indigenous peoples and all other Canadians may find ways of listening with respect to one another, and building together those social, economic and political institutions that will reflect the concerns of all, and will serve the deep yearnings of all for a society filled with justice and peace.
- 30 -
For further information, contact: Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate, 416-924-9199 ext. 276; [or] The Venerable Jim Boyles, General Secretary, 416-924-9199 ext. 280
Contact Doug Tindal, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, 416-924-9199, ext. 257 [sic, should be 256] 416-763-6592 (residence)
Notes
Le primat recommande continuer a prier pour le Quebec a la suite du referendum : une declaration aux Anglicans canadiens Par l'Archeveque Michael Peers
TORONTO, le 31 Octobre 1995
Le referendum au Quebec n'est pas une victoire pour le federalisme ni unde defaite pour la souverainete. C'est peut-etre une victoire pour le Canada, mais seulement si le vote est considere non pas comme une fin mais comme un potential de renouvellement.
Au cours des derniers jours, j'ai communique avec des Anglicans dans tout le Canada. Des milliers se sont reunis pour prier au suject de ce referendum. Il ne s'agissait pas de prieres pour un resultat specifique. Il s'agissait plutot de simples prieres pour appuyer le gens du Quebec alors qu'ils devaient prendre leur decision.
L'Eglise anglicane du Canada fait partie de ce pays depuis presque 300 ans sous de nombreuses structures politiques differentes. L'Eglise preconise la communion et l'unite dans le Christ, et continuera de le faire a l'avenir.
Je demande aux Anglicans de continuer a prier pour tous les gens du Quebec au cours des prochaines semaines. L'eglise continuera de chercher l'unite dans le Christ et la reconciliation parmi tous ceux qui celebrent et ceux qui pleurent a la suite de ce resultat. Je fais appel a tous les Anglicans pour chercher des occasions de reconciliation.
Prions tous pour que le gouvernement du Canada et le gouvernement du Quebec puissent faire preuve de sagesse et de moderation. Le referendum a etabli l'orientation des negociations futures, mais ne les a pas resolues.
Les prochains mois et les prochaines annees seront des moments pour des negociations emotionnelles et difficiles. C'est le temps pour nous d'exprimer notre profond attachement a notre societe en priant avec ferveur, en nous impliquent individuellement partout ou c'est possible de dialoguer, et aussi de participer au processus politique. Soyons solidaires et prions pour que nos chefs politiques fassent preuve de sagesse alors que nous essayons ensemble de discerner un nouveau partenariat viable dans notre pays.
Je demande a l'Esprit de Dieu de nous conduire vers une communaute juste et pacificque. Je prie pour que les gens du Quebec, les aborigenes et tous les Canadiens puissent trouver des moyens d'ecouter avec respect les idees des uns et des autres, et pour construire ensemble des institutions sociales, economiques et politiques qui refleteront la pensee de tous et chacun, et qui serviront les aspirations profondes de tout le monde, d'une societe comblee de justice et de paix.
- 30 -
Pour plus de renseignements, contactez: Archeveque Michael Peers, Primat 416-924-9199 poste 276
Contact Sam Carriere, media relations: (416) 924-9199 ext. 256, (416) 763-6592 residence
Subjects
Quebec (Province) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Quebec (Province) - Politics and government
Quebec Referendum (31 October 1995)
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and politics - Quebec
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Canada - English-French relations
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Anglicans approve preparation of new hymn book

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official21
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 9) -- The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, meeting in Ottawa this week, has approved continuation of work on a new hymn book.
The 300-member body passed a motion authorizing the Hymn Book Task Force to complete preparation of the new book, which introduces female imagery of God, inclusive language and a broad range of musical styles.
Synod members had the opportunity to express their views about the book during a 90-minute hearing held earlier this week.
Although some members objected to the creation of a new book when the church already has two official hymnals, most speakers expressed support for a book with a broader and more inclusive range of material.
In addition to well-loved traditional hymns, the new book includes popular folk tunes, gospel music, contemporary praise choruses and music from countries around the world. George Black, chair of the Hymn Book Task Force, told Synod the group also tried to find material on subjects which are under-represented in the existing hymnals, such as justice and peace issues and environmental concerns.
Not included in the new book are hymns which use imagery glorifying war, such as Onward Christian Soldiers.
Work remaining to be done on the new hymn book includes the selection of music and obtaining copyright permissions. The final version of the new book will got to the Anglican Church's Council of General Synod for permission to publish for use.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Hymns - Anglican Church of Canada
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Hymn Book Task Force
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Praise. 1998
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Aboriginal Anglicans get approval to form self-determining community within the church

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official22
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 9) -- The 300-member General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada has accepted and confirmed a covenant which encourages indigenous peoples to create a self-determining community within the church.
The covenant was drafted and signed by Aboriginal Anglicans at a gathering in Winnipeg last April.
Bishop Gordon Beardy of the Diocese of Keewatin, told Synod it is time for native people from across the country to begin a dialogue on what they mean by self determination and partnership within the Anglican Church. (Bishop Beardy is the second Aboriginal person elected bishop in the Canadian Anglican Church.)
Bishops James Cruickshank of the Diocese of Cariboo, said he was "deeply moved" by the desire of Aboriginal Anglicans to shape their future. "I believe one of the great promises of the Gospel is that we can be responsible for our own lives," he said. "What I hear our native brothers and sisters saying is that it is time for them to accept responsibility for their future and to move from a feeling of dependency on the church to a sense of independence."
Although one speaker expressed concern that native and non-native Anglicans would lose their connection if a self-determining Aboriginal church were created, most Synod members expressed overwhelming support for the covenant.
"We are letting go of something precious, but it may be necessary to let go so that we an receive each other back again in fullness," said Bishop Cruickshank. "I believe we will be a richer church for it."
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (623) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native Covenant
Covenants - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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