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Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1335
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Brown
Seconder
Bishop Conlin
Prologue
Moved by: Bishop Brown
Seconded by: Bishop Lawrence
That the Pastoral be considered and edited as necessary. CARRIED
It was agreed that the Reverend Don Brown should be requested to prepare a list of all Members of Parliament and distribute copies of the list to all the Bishops.
Text
That we accept this Pastoral on Capital Punishment. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL : TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
Violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society is shocked by the murder of police in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the person will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of us there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing execution where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- despite the common assumption that the death penalty functions as a deterrent, Canadian experience has shown that there has been no increase in the murder rate following the abolition of capital punishment, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be re-introduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual person before God.
Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our police and staff of correctional institutions we put them under almost overwhelming stress and this in turn may contribute to citizens feeling the need to take the law into their own hands. This could only lead to an increase in the spiral of violence.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God, a God of love who cares infinitely for every person.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
FEBRUARY, 1987.
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1396
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Lackey
Seconder
Bishop Hannen
Text
That this Pastoral Letter be issued to the members of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Citizens of Canada. CARRIED. ONE OPPOSITION #7-10-84
Notes
It was agreed that copies of the Pastoral Letter on Capital Punishment should be sent to the leaders of the three Federal political parties. The Primate said that a mailing would go to all the clergy following the meeting of the National Executive Council, but that the Bishops are free to use the letter immediately and to release it to local papers.
It was agreed that clergy should be encouraged to read the letter in the Churches on a Sunday that is appropriate. The Diocesan Bishop may indicate what date he wishes to designate for the reading of the letter.
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL LETTER
TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
An increase in violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Recent criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society has been shocked by the rash of murders of policemen in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the individual will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of use there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing the hanging where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- the ignoring of evidence concerning the ineffectiveness of the death penalty as a deterrent, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be reintroduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual before God.
Mere incarceration without rehabilitation will not change the murderer. Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our law reform officers we put them under almost overwhelming pressure to take the law into their own hands.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider Church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in his love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God. He is a God of love who cares infinitely for every individual.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA, NOVEMBER 1984
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

Churches condemn army use

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article3766
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 October
Volume
116
Issue
8
Page
1
Notes
"Archbishop Michael Peers lambasted Prime Minister Brian Mulroney for calling Mohawk warriors terrorists, saying the Canadian government sounded like leaders in South Africa or El Salvador". "He noted that traditionally the terms terrorist and freedom fighter are used interchangeably, depending on the user's point of view. `One person's terrorist is another person's freedom fighter', the primate said." "Archbishop Peers stressed that the churches did not condone the Mohawks' use of violence, but could understand why someone would resort to it `after generations of unresolved conflict'."
Article also translated into French on page 6 as "Primate fustige Mulroney".
Subjects
Mohawk Indians (Oka, Que.)
Indians of North America - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Indians of North America - Quebec (Province)
Quebec (Province) - History - Native Crisis, 1990
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Indians of North America - Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Death of Ryerson Student

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1889
Date
1992 June 18-26
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 73
Date
1992 June 18-26
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 73
Mover
Mr. J. Tomlinson
Seconder
Most Rev. E. Lackey
Text
That this General Synod extends its sincere condolences to the family of Paul Michael Semple and offers its prayers for God's comfort and compassion to be with his family, friends and the community here at Ryerson. CARRIED Act 73
Notes
The Primate advised that [this] resolution would be forwarded to the parties concerned.
Subjects
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Semple, Paul Michael, d. 1992
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (33rd : 1992 : Toronto, Ont.)
Less detail

Heads buried in sand : Viewpoint

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article28561
Author
Huddleston, Lee
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2001 Winter
Author
Huddleston, Lee
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2001 Winter
Volume
8
Issue
1
Page
21
Notes
The author, "is an Anglican priest, a former police officer, and a teacher. He works full-time with marginalized youth in Kingston, Ont." The author describes a panel discussion, on crime and how the church should respond to, which he attended in 2000. He argues passionately that while the churches need to continue their ministry with prisoners, this is "only one way the church should respond. If hearts are going to be changed [as the Rev. Dale Lang, whose son was murdered, and who spoke at the panel urged] and individuals told they are special and made in the image of God, we need workers in the field to help facilitate such a transformation before the crime occurs. Restorative justice occurs after the crime."
Subjects
Justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Restorative justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with youth - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Lang, Dale (Dale Frederick), 1951-
Less detail

Jason has been shot ! : the true story of family, faith and the power of forgiveness

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog4470
Author
Lang, Dale (Dale Frederick), 1951-
Publication Date
c2003
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
BX 5620 L35J3 2003
Author
Lang, Dale (Dale Frederick), 1951-
Place
[Oakville ON]
Publisher
Castle Quay Books
Publication Date
c2003
Physical_Description
151 p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[B]y Rev. Dale Lang and Mark Lang".
The author recounts the story of his life and ministry especially since 28 April 1999 when his son Jason Lang was shot and killed by another student at his high school in Taber, Alberta, days after the Columbine High School shooting in Colorado.
Added Entry
Lang, Mark
Subjects
Lang, Dale (Dale Frederick), 1951-
Dale, Jason, 1982-1999
Forgiveness - Religious aspects - Christianity
Spiritual healing
Parents of murder victims - Alberta - Taber - Biography
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Biography
Forgiveness - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
ISBN
1-894860-20-9
Call Number
BX 5620 L35J3 2003
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Letter to the editor: Deafening silence

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40458
Author
Davidson, Cathy
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 September
Author
Davidson, Cathy
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 September
Volume
140
Issue
7
Page
4
Notes
"As a proud Canadian, I was deeply saddened by the tragedy in Moncton, N.B. [when three Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officers were murdered]. We as Canadians expect such occurrences to sadly happen to our neighbours south of us". "My only disappointment came from my parish. Not one mention or prayer wass offered. A tragedy, a Canadian tragedy, a human one, was totally bypassed, [as if] nothing happened. I would have thought as Christians we would have offered prayers for the fallen and their families".
Subjects
Police murders - New Brunswick - Moncton
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Murders shake town

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article32474
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2005 April
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2005 April
Volume
131
Issue
4
Page
6
Notes
Three young Anglicans were murdered in Montreal Lake, Saskatchewan. The Diocese is ministering to the community which is reeling in shock.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Saskatchewan
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bird, Valerie
Less detail

Primate commends statement by bishop of Toronto

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8059
Date
2002 July 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2002 July 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
MEDIA RELEASE, Office of the Primate, Anglican Church of Canada
TORONTO, July 15, 2002
Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, commended today's statement by Archbishop Terence Finlay of the Diocese of Toronto concerning last night's brutal murder of David Rosenzweig.
"Archbishop Finlay's response to this event in Toronto reminds every person of faith and conscience that acts of hate have no legitimate place in our common life. The death of Mr. Rosenzweig is a personal tragedy for him and for his family and friends, and a national reminder of our need to see in one another the image of God, not the image of hate or fear that we so often and so tragically project onto one another."
Archbishop Peers expressed gratitude for the timeliness and clarity of Archbishop Finlay's response.
Link: Bishop of Toronto responds to murder [See text of Archbishop Finlay's response in Notes]
- 30 -
Contact: Rev. Dr. Michael Thompson, Principal Secretary to the Primate, 416-924-9199 ext. 277 mthompson@national.anglican.ca
OR
Rev. Canon Eric Beresford, Consultant, Ethics and Interfaith Relations, Anglican Church of Canada, 416-924-9199 ext. 209 eberesford@national.anglican.ca
July 15, 2002
Notes
Bishop of Toronto responds to murder
Toronto, Jul. 15, 2002 -- MEDIA RELEASE FROM THE DIOCESE OF TORONTO
The Most Reverend Terence Finlay, Anglican Archbishop of Toronto, expressed his shock and horror at the tragic murder last night of David Rosenzweig. The unprovoked attack on the distinctively dressed Hassidic [i.e. Hasidic] Jew, who was helping his son whose car broke down, has been labeled as a hate crime.
Archbishop Finlay said, "I extend my prayers and heartfelt sympathy to the Rosenzweig family on the loss of their husband and father. The death of any person brings much sadness and pain. But even more so when it has resulted from such a senseless act of violence. Hatred has absolutely no place in our understanding of God's purposes for our world."
"I share with my Jewish brothers and sisters common ancestry from the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. As a Christian, I am commanded to love my neighbour as myself, teaching that derives from the Torah. I believe that all acts prompted by hate, whether defacing of property, bullying or taunting individuals or groups or, ultimately, the murder of a human being, are completely contrary to the teaching of Jesus Christ. Each of us has part to play to put a stop to such evil".
The Anglican Diocese of Toronto has been a founding partner in Christian-Jewish Dialogue in Toronto and an active participant in building ecumenical and interfaith relationships with other faith communities.
For further information, contact:
Archdeacon Colin R. Johnson, Executive Assistant to the Archbishop of Toronto, 135 Adelaide Street East, Toronto, ON M5C 1L8 (416) 363-6021 ext. 214 (416) 363-3683 (FAX) cjohnson@toronto.anglican.ca
- 30 -
Subjects
Rosenzweig, David
Antisemitism - Canada
Antisemitism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hate crimes - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and other religions - Judaism - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Toronto
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.