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2018 BUDGET RESOLUTIONS #007-01-17-11 to 007-05-17-11 : Suicide Prevention in 2018 Budget

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official10596
Date
2017 November 10-12
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-17-11 [sic i.e. 13-11-17]
Date
2017 November 10-12
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-17-11 [sic i.e. 13-11-17]
Mover
The Rt. Rev. Fraser Lawton
Seconder
Ms. Cynthia Haines-Turner
Prologue
The Rt. Rev. Fraser Lawton and Ms. Cynthia Haines-Turner presented two resolutions that pertained to the 2018 budget. Before members voted by consensus, Bishop Lawton noted that the motion from the Financial Management Committee Report (#007-04-17-11) had been amended into two motions.
Text
That this Council of General Synod encourage and support a conversation about a shared strategy between Indigenous Ministries and Council of the North Diocesan leaders as to how to allocate the new money for Suicide Prevention provided in the 2018 budget and 2019-2022 forecasts.
ADOPTED #13-17-11 [sic i.e. 13-11-17]
Subjects
Budget - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
Anglican Church of Canada. Indigenous Ministries
Less detail

Across Canada: Church responds to suicide pandemic

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38117
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 October
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 October
Volume
138
Issue
8
Page
5
Notes
"Suicide is 'not an easy tea and cookie conversation', Cynthia Patterson told a gathering of about 200 indigenous Anglicans at the Seventh Sacred Circle. However, she added, the pandemic among aboriginal people can no longer be ignored. In Nunavut, the suicide rate is 15 times the national average -- which is 15 per 100,000 people. In the Arctic, it is 11 times the national average. Families need to talk about suicide instead of sweeping it under the rug, said Patterson. 'We have kids, aunts and uncles who die and the pain is so great .. We don't talk about them .. It's as if they've disappeared'. For its part, the Anglican church has moved oversight of the suicide-prevention program to the indigenous ministry department, noted Patterson. The aim is to 'extend its reach into every nook and cranny', said National Indigenous Anglican Bishops Mark MacDonald. Suicide prevention will now be part of training for clergy, catechists and other church workers, he told the Journal". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Canada - Statistics
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Suicidal behavior
Patterson, Cynthia, 1955-
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Anglican Church of Canada. Indigenous Ministries
Less detail

Big care on campus

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40476
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 September
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 September
Volume
140
Issue
7
Page
8-9
Notes
"For all its benefits, university can be an unsettling experience for young adults" (p. 8). "Enter university chaplaincy services, multifaith islands of calm dedicated to the spiritual care and development of students. Often poorly funded and unable to offer secure contracts, academic chaplaincies attract a unique type of mentors who provide one-on-one pastoral care not offered by a college's secular counsellors and health-care professionals". The Rev. Megan Collings-Moore has been the Anglican chaplain at Renison University College, an Anglican affiliate of Ontario's Waterloo University, for eight years. "Today, most chaplains will tell you that dealing with student mental health issues such as depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder is an increasing part of their role .... 'Last year, I did a lot of triage for suicidal ideation', says Collings-Moore" (p. 8). The Rev. Richard Reimer, a Lutheran chaplain at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, "echoes her point that student mental health is a growing issue" (p. 8). The Rev. Emily Carr was a former ecumenical chaplain at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon but had to leave the financially insecure position for established Anglican parish ministry. "In her two years, Carr married students and presided at student funerals. 'Chaplains are called when there's a death on campus or a rape, and we can help by participating in conversations about these', she says. At Dalhousie University in Halifax, Clement Mehlman has been an unordained Lutheran chaplain for 16 years. Mehlman, who taught English for 31 years before training for the chaplaincy, feels certain students may feel more comfortable with an unordained adviser" (p. 9). "Ultimately, chaplains cannot take away the stress of campus life. But they can walk with students and help them navigate it -- and be there as they wrestle with the big questions of where they want to go in life. And as student mental health issues overwhelm secular counselling services, the healing guidance of chaplains is more essential than ever" (p. 9).
Subjects
Campus ministry - Canada
Campus ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Campus ministry - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
College chaplains - Anglican Church of Canada
Universities and colleges - Canada
Youth - Religious life
Pastoral ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
College students - Mental health - Canada
College students - Religious life - Canada
Suicide - Prevention
Carr, Emily
Collings-Moore, Megan
Mehlman, Clement
Reimer, Richard
Less detail

Church must help people focus on wellness

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40747
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 June
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 June
Volume
143
Issue
6
Page
10
Notes
The Rev. Canon Martin Brokenleg, a psychologist and Anglican priest, addressed a suicide prevention workshop which took place 27 March 2017 in Toronto. The workshop was hosted by the office of National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald. Brokenleg said "the more you tell someone not to do something, the more you embed the idea in them". "The truth is, 'Thou shalts not' has never worked. Only 'Thou shalts' work". "What this means, Brokenleg said, is that the church should be targeting the suicide crisis afflicting Indigenous communities by a 'fixation on wellness', an intense focus on helping people -- especially the young -- grow to be all they were meant to be, and convince them, by words and deeds -- of their infinite worth". The Rev. Nancy Bruyere, the church's suicide prevention co-ordinator for western Canada and the Arctic , who attended the workshop "said she was greatly encouraged by Brokenleg's talk, because it seemed to confirm what her community has already been doing".
Subjects
Brokenleg, Martin K., 1946-
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native youth - Canada
Native youth - Suicidal behavior - Canada - Prevention
Bruyere, Nancy
Less detail

Co-ordinator named for suicide prevention

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35967
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 November
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 November
Volume
135
Issue
9
Page
3
Notes
"The Council of the North has appointed veteran activist and community organizer Cynthia Patterson as the co-ordinator of new suicide prevention programs." Contains background information on Ms. Patterson. "Her task now will be to link communities to the best health and suicide prevention resources". Inset article "Anglican Angels hard at work" accompanies this story with the information that: "It is the generosity of Anglicans across Canada that is making it possible for the Council of the North to establish suicide prevention programs to improve the lives of people in small, isolated communities. Funding was raised vis-a-vis the Amazing Grace project. Anglican parishes and groups across Canada gave a total of $97,000."
Subjects
Patterson, Cynthia, 1955-
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
Amazing Grace Project
Less detail

General Synod: Responding to Aboriginal suicide Crisis

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38058
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 September
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 September
Volume
139
Issue
7
Page
7
Notes
"In response to the suicide crisis affecting some native communities in western Canada and the Arctic, the Anglican Church of Canada's indigenous ministries department has appointed a new suicide prevention co-ordinator for that region. The Rev. Nancy Bruyere, a non-stipendiary priest in the diocese of Keewatin, has been named to the position. Bruyere is associate priest at Christ Church Sagkeeng First Nation in Fort Alexander, and also serves in Little Black River First Nation, Hollow Water First Nation and Manitgotagan -- all in Manitoba". "Suicide and self-inflicted injuries are the top causes of death in Canada for First Nations youth and adults up to age 44, according to Health Canada. Aboriginal youth commit suicide about five to six times more often than non-aboriginal youth".
Subjects
Bruyere, Nancy
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Suicidal behavior
Less detail

In other news at Sacred Circle: Glimmers in the darkness

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38931
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 October
Volume
141
Issue
8
Page
13
Notes
"Diocesan Indigenous bishop of Missinipi Adam Halkett and Council of the North chair and diocesan bishop of Saskatchewan Michael Hawkins reported that with help from the national church, the diocese has been able to provide free suicide prevention training to Anglicans and non-Anglicans from at-risk communities. The diocese is also working with the Prince Albert Grand Council -- which represents 12 First Nations band governments in Saskatchewan -- on a program called Embrace Life, which focuses on suicide prevention, intervention and recovery. Hawkins described the partnership as a great move, saying, 'I think they [Grand Council] grew in appreciation for what the church can do, and we grew in appreciation of building bridges as opposed to competition". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Anglican Church of Canada. Sacred Circle (8th : 2015 : Port Elgin, Ont.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Saskatchewan
Halkett, Adam S. (Adam Samson), 1954-
Hawkins, Michael (Michael William), 1962-
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Suicide - Prevention
Embrace Life
Prince Albert Grand Council
Less detail

'My little residenital school suitcase'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38407
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 Summer
2013 July
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 Summer
2013 July
Volume
139
Issue
6
Page
1, 6
Notes
Marcel Petiquay attended two Roman Catholic residential schools in Quebec (Amos Indian Residential School and Pointe Bleue Residential School) for 12 years starting when he was six years old in 1958. "Petiquay arrived with a small brown suitcase that his mother, Marie, had lovingly packed for him". "His reflections on [former students'] stories and his own life led to 'Ma Petite Valise du Pensionnat' ('My Little Residential School Suitcase'), a poem about loss and redemption resulting from his 12-year voyage at residential schools". "On April 25 [2013], Petiquay offered a copy of 'Ma Petite Valise' as a gesture of healing and reconciliation at the Quebec national event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). With him when he spoke was the Rev. Cynthia Patterson, a priest from the diocese of Quebec. Petiquay carried a suitcase on whose outer cover he literally written his poem. Patterson carried another suitcase, in which Petiquay's poem, as well as other gestures of reconciliation from the Anglican Church of Canada and the diocese of Quebec, would be presented to the TRC commissioners". "Patterson, who co-ordinates the Anglican church's suicide prevention program for the Council of the North, was so deeply moved by Petiquay's poem that she sought him out for a possible project on reconciliation". "Petiquay's story os one of 'courage and the spiritual journey to continue and to share his journey' said Patterson. 'I could see it in use around suicide prevention work. I could see it in almost any setting. I could see it in our own spiritual healing. There's the education and awareness [component] that we have the legal and moral obligation as church to do'." "And so it was that at the Grand Salon of Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Petiquay and Patterson presented the powerful story of 'Ma Petite Valise' and other offerings. Patterson, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and Quebec Bishop Dennis Drainville presented copies of native language translations of former primate Michael Peers's 1993 apology to aboriginal people, a brochure about the church's suicide prevention program and, from the church's archives, a photograph of small native children carrying small suitcases that, like Petiquay's, their parents had packed for them when they went to residential schools".
Subjects
Petiquay, Marcel, 1952-
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Indian residential schools - Canada - Catholic Church
Patterson, Cynthia, 1955-
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Healing - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Quebec
Canada. Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.