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Archbishop Defends Opposition to South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3200
Date
1981 August 5
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1981 August 5
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Aug. 5, 1981
Anglican Archbishop Lewis Garnsworthy of Toronto has responded to criticism of the Church's stand on South Africa. That criticism came from Canon Malcolm Hughes of Montreal who recently returned from South Africa. He publicly disagreed with the support the Church has given to the isolating of South Africa economically.
Archbishop Garnsworthy, who also spent considerable time in South Africa last year, declared, "I would like to ask him to specify what changes in the apartheid policy in South Africa are actually taking place. There are many responsible people who feel any changes being made are no more than cosmetic and many of us would like to be assured that this is not so."
"The Anglican Church of Canada has never said that multi-national corporations ought not to invest and give employment to South African people, white and black. What the Church has stressed is that when corporations from outside South Africa engage in business and industry in that country, they do so with a deep sense of Christian social responsibility in terms of wages, working conditions and general social attitudes. This also means a social responsibility towards the evil of apartheid. Unless Mr. Hughes can substantiate some very real changes in the whole South Africa policy, as expressed racially, there are many of us who will remain in doubt as to the validity of what is really happening."
Hughes, who is the editor of the Anglican Diocese of Montreal's newspaper, is a Director of the Canadian-South Africa Society. His trip was partially funded by a study grant from the South African Foundation, which the Primate of the Anglican Church, Archbishop E.W. Scott says, "represents a particular point of view on South Africa -- one which stems from those in positions of privilege."
The Anglican Church of Canada's highest parliament, General Synod has repeatedly asked that there be no further investments in South Africa by Canadian banks, businesses and multi-national corporations in an effort to pressure its Government to discontinue the policy of apartheid and to give black South Africans equality and the vote.
As recently as last May 5th the Anglican Church was represented in a major presentation made to External Affairs Minister Mark McGuigan by the Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility.
Although Canon Hughes stated that black leaders to whom he spoke were supportive of the South African Government's present pace of change and want investments, the Rev. Murray MacInnes, African specialist on the National Staff of the Church, points out that he did not mention, however, that to support disinvestment publicly is treason for a South African. In spite of this, the Church of the Province of South Africa, in a statement issued in June, 1980, condemned, "acceptance of or acquiescence in the evil and injustice inherent in Apartheid. This system cannot be amended. It must be eradicated." The statement continued, "The Church must seek to demonstrate the necessity for the redistribution of the power and wealth which accumulates in the centre of the economy of the country at the expense of the dispossessed and deprived who live on the peripheries."
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
Richard J. Berryman
Media Officer
600 Jarvis Street
Toronto
(416) 924-9192
Subjects
Hughes, Malcolm (Malcolm Albert), 1933-
Garnsworthy, Lewis S. (Lewis Samuel), 1922-1990
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1948-1994
Disinvestment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Corporate social responsibility - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Archbishop Scott in South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6877
Date
1986 February 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1986 February 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto - Archbishop E.W. Scott, Canada's representative on the Commonwealth Commission on South Africa, arrived in Johannesburg on the week-end. From there he will join other members of the Commission in a series of visits to "Front-Line States" in southern Africa this week.
The Commission will then return to the Republic of South Africa for meetings with internal leaders of the black majority in the country, and, hopefully, with its Government.
Archbishop Scott will return to Canada by mid-March for the meetings of all the Primates of the Anglican Communion in Mississauga.
If there is anything of substance to be reported on the Commission's work at that time, the Archbishop will meet with the media. As much advance notice of such media opportunities will be given as possible.
- 30 -
Richard J. Berryman
Media Officer
Subjects
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Commonwealth Group of Eminent Persons
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1948-1994
Less detail

[Christmas Messages 1985]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6875
Date
1985 December 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1985 December 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto - Enclosed are the Christmas Messages of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev. and Rt. Hon. Robert Runcie, and the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Most Rev. Edward W. Scott.
If you are wondering about the signature on Archbishop Runcie's message, it is his official signature "Robert Cantuar." Cantuar is the ancient Latin name of his diocese of Canterbury.
Along with these messages may I include my own personal best wishes for the holiday season and for health and satisfaction in your work in the new year. Thank you very much for your co-operation in 1985 and please feel free to get in touch at any time if I can be of assistance to you in 1986.
[signature]
The Rev. Richard J. Berryman
Media Officer
Notes
The Archbishop of Canterbury's Christmas Message 1985
"Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will towards men."
The heart of the message of Christmas is this - the good news of God's entering our world in the birth of Jesus to share our lives, our suffering, even our death. And in so identifying with us, with our trials and tribulations, he turns them around, bringing good out of evil, compassion out of cruelty, hope out of horror. Let us hold on to this message as we look ahead, and as we remember a trying and troubled year for many parts of our Anglican family.
Throughout 1985 we have experienced famine in the Sudan and Ethiopia; continued conflict in Central America and the Middle East; revelation of atrocities in Uganda; riots on the streets of English cities; oppression and violence in South Africa; a devastating earthquake in Mexico City; communal conflict and refugees in Southeast Asia.
Perhaps South Africa has been most on our minds. Archbishop Philip Russell has led the Church there in a gentle but firm manner, making it clear that the Church can never support a system which treats men and women as less than human because of the colour of their skin.
The prophetic witness of Bishop Desmond Tutu has caught the attention and warmed the hearts of many. His is a ministry characterised by a powerful mixture of courage, realism and humility. He knows his needs of others: he cannot achieve lasting peace and goodwill in South Africa alone. He must maintain the support of his own people, and he must win the support of the white population and the government. He needs the practical sympathy of the international community and of the Church. I am regularly in touch with him as are many others of you throughout the Anglican family. We pray that his moderate voice is not silenced.
In South Africa, Uganda, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ireland, Britain, Mexico, Jordan and Sri Lanka we are learning in the Communion that when one member suffers, we all suffer. And we are learning to express our common sympathy in ways which build up the common good.
Let us pray this Christmas that our common life and witness may bear glory to God int he highest, build peace on earth, and bear good will towards all.
[signed] Robert Cantuar
December 1985
A Christmas Message to the People of Canada from the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada
At Christmas every year I am struck by the profound simplicity of the revelation contained in the all too familiar song of the angels, that God wills good for his people and calls people to will good for each other.
As you may have seen in the media recently, I have accepted new responsibility to be the Canadian appointee to the Commonwealth Commission on Southern Africa. Part of my reason for doing that is that I see the Commission as a concrete move to achieve ways and means for people who find themselves trapped in tragic circumstances to will good to and for each other. In that, I am doing, on an international scale, no more than we all should be endeavouring to do not only at Christmas, but throughout every day of our lives at the personal level.
I wish two things for the people of my country this Christmastide. First that we may recover the sense that we live out the ordinariness of our daily lives in the midst of eternity. That what we do each day has eternal value. That seems so simple, but is so profound. If we receive that gift, my second wish will follow.
It is that that profound truth will set each of us free, empower us to will good and to reach in love to each other. As two lines of a poem I read recently say, "Having glimpsed some magnificent overpowering truth, Makes me doubt the finality of anything less."
The overpowering truth that we see in the Birth in the manger, that God will us good and calls us to will good for each other should cause us to doubt the finality of the pride of race, the greed of power, the fear of those who are different, and the pessimism that this is a God-forsaken world.
God has not foresaken this world. Christmas tells us he is immersed in its human life and history. We go out day by day to meet him in it. That is our reason for hope in the face of all the hopelessness of our weary world.
Good will to you all and hope fill your hearts and homes this Christmas.
Yours faithfully,
[signed]
Edward Scott
Archbishop
Subjects
Christmas - Anglican Church of Canada
Christmas - Anglican Communion
Christmas - Church of England
Runcie, Robert A.K. (Robert Alexander Kennedy), 1921-2000
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-2021
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Less detail

Church in South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2954
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Hollis
Seconder
Crabb
Prologue
Bishop Bothwell presented a statement that was suggested be sent to the Church in South Africa and a second statement to go to the Government of Canada.
"In humility we wish to express our solidarity with you during this present time of torment. Your Prime Minister is reported to have said in October, 1976 that, `South Africa will continue to keep blacks out of the country's political life.' The established inequalities and injustices that flow daily from this intransigent position are well known by you and you have continually interpreted obedience to God as the necessity for speaking and standing against these indignities. In the words of Archbishop B. Burnett, `It is evident that there will not be the necessary change in the fabric of our society without the determined effort of black people.'
We rejoice that recent statements of the South African Council of Churches, the Christian Institute, and the Diocesan Council of Capetown [i.e. Cape Town] all firmly call for the holding of a fully representative national convention of all peoples of South Africa and condemn detention without charge or trial. We recognize in them and the statement of the seventeen Black Dutch Reformed Church ministers increasing unity and work for the liberation of all South Africans. The seventeen issued a call to their people in the words, `Let us not despair but confirm our joy and faith in Jesus Christ the Liberator,' that challenges us all.
We mourn with you for those who have fallen in the present crisis and will continue to pray and work for the release of persons detained without charges such as our Anglican sister in the faith, Mrs. Sally Motlana, a vice-President of the South Africa Council of Churches and one of the Presidents of the All Africa Council of Churches.
Your call to white South Africans particularly to recognize their responsibility for the sinful structures of Apartheid is also heard by us because of our complicity with them. We too take seriously the call to repentance, for our indifference and that of our government and economic interests have increased injustice in South Africa.
Your government, rather than coming to terms with her own people and the inevitability of change towards justice, has sought massive international assistance to weather the internal economic crisis, seriously aggravated by massive increases in defense and security spending. In February 1976 a $200 million loan was secured for the government owned Electric Supply Commission from 28 United States, European and Canadian banks, and a larger $500 million loan is being sought for balance-of-payment support at this time when there is a considerable fear of slowdown in foreign investment. Together with other Canadian Christians we pledge renewed efforts to terminate this direct support for the regime which oppresses the majority of your people.
The present open expression of dissent in South Africa demonstrates confidence in another power than racist oppression. It is a sign of the indomitable spirit and hope burning in the hearts of the vast majority of its black population and the substantial minority of whites. We pray that God will bless your efforts to support and sustain spirit and hope with the enriching gospel of Christ our Saviour."
Moved by Bothwell
Seconded by Graham
That this Statement be sent from this National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada to the Church in South Africa.
Text
Amendment
That a message of commendation be sent to the Archbishop of Cape Town expressing appreciation for the courageous statement in his pastoral letter of September 1, 1976. CARRIED
Notes
The Council requested that they receive the full documentation on this subject. (See Appendix 1)
Appendix 1
PASTORAL LETTER FROM THE ARCHBISHOP OF CAPE TOWN, TO BE READ AT ALL SERVICES ON SUNDAY, 5TH SEPTEMBER, OR WHERE THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE, ON SUNDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER.
(Embargoed to the Press until 12 noon on Sunday, 5/9/76)
Dear brothers and sisters in Christ,
In times of turmoil and stress our first responsibility is, as always, to be obedient to God. Faith that is rooted in obedience to Him strengthens and encourages us all because it asserts that "the light shines in the darkness and the darkness has not overcome it" (John 1:5).
If, moveover, we are to speak and act with the mind of Christ, we need to sift carefully the demands men make on us, to speak or to be silent; to act in a particular way, or even remain inactive. It is not at all difficult to act or react in times such as these in such a fashion as simply to demonstrate that we ourselves are part of the disease that needs healing.
It has nevertheless become needful to address ourselves both as Churchmen and as citizens and also to address our Government. With a deep sense of urgency and after careful deliberation your Diocesan Council at its meeting on 28th August, passed without a dissentient a resolution, the contents of which I now convey to you:
"In this time of crisis we mourn with the black community and all others who have suffered bereavement, injury, humiliation and material loss. We condemn the detention without charge or trial of persons thought to be leading the black struggle for justice and liberation.
We call on the white community in general and the government in particular to acknowledge that the policy of so-called separate development, which we do not recognise as the Will of God, has failed. We believe we are seeing in the present turmoil the judgment of God on this policy.
We call for the holding of a fully representative national convention that would prepare a new constitution based on full and equal human rights, participatory democracy and economic justice.
We call on all Church members to acknowledge their share of responsibility for the grave disorders of their society and to place themselves and their country unreservedly in the hands of God, and to allow His Spirit of power, love and discernment to re-direct them in the ways of justice and peace."
The resolution ends here. But if its effects end there it will have had only propaganda value. For that reason I have written to the Prime Minister and enclosed a copy of the resolution. It have made it clear to him, moreover, that we as a Church cannot address him on such a matter out of our own righteousness but from a conviction laid upon us by the Lord. For that reason also this cannot be the end of the matter.
Of one thing I am certain. God is calling us all to repentance. Unless in particular white Christians admit the wrongs they have done to black people and take action to redress them, there can be no possibility of healing in our land. We have failed grievously to act towards our fellow Christians and fellowmen as those beloved of God. We have been greedy and not shared our good things and opportunities with our brothers. We have been proud and failed to come alongside our brothers, nor have we shared with them in a determination to work for changes in our society. We have failed to recognize the worth to our Father of people who do not have our colour or traditions and we have not embraced them unreservedly as brothers. We have not shown them that we need them for our own growth as Christians.
Black Christians will certainly know themselves also as children of God needing repentance. "All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God" says St. Paul, and we need to ask God to deliver us all from seeing only the mote in our brother's eye. But at this moment it is those of us who exercise political power and benefit from the established inequalities of our society who bear a far greater responsibility for what we now experience.
It is evident nevertheless that there will not be the necessary changes in the fabric of our society without the determined efforts of black people. You too need God's resources to press for justice without rancour and to struggle for a better way of life without becoming the prisoners of hatred. You will need God's strength to strive and not to yield where your decisions are rightly based in God's will. You will need the gifts of God's love to retain the freedom to forgive.
It is relatively painless, however, to say what the Diocesan Council resolution says. During the last two or three decades we have made many excellent statements. But we have failed, by and large, to accept from God and to use the spiritual resources to do what we talk about. We can even be so absorbed by what we call the burning issues of the day, that we fail to perceive that the real issue for Christians is not simply the transformation of society, but whether or not we believe in God in such a way that within our fellowship we reflect the ethics of the Kingdom and become the means by which the Lord can transform our life together.
We, both priests and people, need to submit ourselves constantly to the searching scrutiny of God's Spirit in prayer, fasting and study of Holy Scripture to see whether we ourselves give expression to the power of the redeeming and healing love of God in all our relationships.
This is an exercise for those who have a strong social conscience as well as those who are deeply committed to personal evangelism, and most of all, for those who are involved in neither. Then we may manifest a Gospel which reveals the depth of our divine calling, and frees within us the unique resources and irreplaceable light from God to direct and sustain us in our search for a more humane social order.
And so I exhort you with St. Paul: "Stand fast in the faith. Quit you like men; be strong. Let all that you do be done in love" and the blessing of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, anoint and sustain you.
+ Bill Cape Town
Bishopscourt, Claremont, 7700.
1st September, 1976.
Subjects
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Soweto
Church of the Province of Southern Africa. Diocese of Cape Town
Burnett, Bill Bendyshe, 1917-
Less detail

Church in South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2955
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bothwell
Seconder
MacKenzie
Text
That the National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada commends to the Government of Canada for its statement on the Republic of South Africa delivered in the General Assembly of the United Nations on November 1, 1976 and urges clear action consonant with the words of the statement:
"The events of the past year demonstrate visibly that time remaining for effective peaceful change is growing shorter day by day. We believe that our individual and collective efforts must be intensified and harmonized -- we believe that no opportunity should be missed to expose the government of South Africa and its electorate to unanimous and relentless international pressures which demand action and change. Change is bound to come. South Africans of all races must face up to that fact and develop a new relationship. If conditions of chronic turbulence which risk deterioration into civil war, with its attendant toll of human tragedy are to be avoided, change must take place, not ten years hence, not five years hence, but now."
and requests the Primate to forward to the Government of Canada a more detailed comment in the light of previous actions by this Church and information available from Anglican and other sources.
The NEC urges the Canadian government publicly to discourage further bank or commercial loans by private or crown financial institutions to the Government of South Africa or any of its crown corporations or agencies.
The NEC requests the Government of Canada to indicate what concrete and specific steps it proposes to take both unilaterally and multilaterally to increase the international censure of South Africa. CARRIED
Subjects
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Foreign relations - South Africa
Less detail

Corporate Social Responsibility

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4497
Date
1973 February 6-8
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1973 February 6-8
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Scovil
Seconder
Goodings
Prologue
During the concluding session of the meeting, the Primate suggested that possibly the NEC might wish to associate itself with actions taken by PECUSA in regard to Corporate Social Responsibility.
Text
That this NEC hear, for information, the action of the Episcopal Church. CARRIED
Notes
Mr. Anthony spoke of the resolutions on Southern Africa filed with twelve U.S. based corporations by a coalition of six denominations in the U.S.A. These proxy resolutions are information (disclosure) requests from the corporations about the nature of their activities in South Africa and Angola where racist, colonial, white regimes rely on police and military powers to maintain themselves. The intention is to raise public awareness of such corporations' involvement in racially troubled areas. The NWP [National World Program] Division feels that it is extremely important and a significant function on the part of Church agencies to exercise their proxy votes in support of these resolutions. It was noted that the Anglican Church of Canada has holdings in four of these U.S. based corporations: IBM, Xerox, Kodak and Exxon.
Reference was made also to the motion approved by the Central Committee of the WCC, supporting this kind of activity and requesting its member Churches, Christian agencies and individual Christians outside Southern Africa to use all their influence, including stockholder action and disinvestment, to press corporations to withdraw investments from and cease trading with South Africa, the Portuguese territories and Rhodesia.
Subjects
Corporate divestiture - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Corporate divestiture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Corporate social responsibility - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Angola - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Angola - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Anthony, Tom (Thomas Murray)
Less detail

[Investment in South Africa]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3155
Date
1977 December 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1977 December 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immediate release -- December 6, 1977
Churches, as legitimate corporate shareholders, have made presentations concerning investments in South Africa to the annual meetings of Canada's Banks before. They will do it again this year, but this time there is a difference.
There is growing support amongst Canadian "opinion-makers" for the Churches' stand. In fact a surprising number of well-known Canadians, many not noted in the past for their agreement with the Church, are backing its stand on this matter:
"I wish to support the position taken by the Anglican, United, Roman Catholic and Lutheran Churches calling for a halt to Canadian Bank loans to the government of South Africa and its agencies, until the imposition of apartheid is discontinued."
A partial list of those who have signed the above statement is enclosed.
Here is a sampling of their remarks:
"I support that churches' position very strongly indeed, and I am glad to know that such action is being taken by so many of the Canadian Churches." - Margaret Laurence (Author)
"I can only sign on a personal basis and not in my official job capacity...I am in complete support of the position of the Churches with regard to Canadian bank loans to the Government of South Africa." - Kathleen Ruff (Human Rights Branch, B.C. Ministry of Labour)
"I appreciate very much the highly intelligent and practical approach which the Taskforce [on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility] is making to the whole problem, and I wish them every success with it." - Lloyd R. Shaw (Chairman, L.E. Shaw Ltd. Halifax)
"Your letter and the accompanying folder are excellent, and I am delighted to add my name to the group of signers who support the churches' position." - Thomas L. Perry, M.D. (Professor of Pharmacology, U.B.C.)
"I am deeply concerned about the worsening situation in Southern Africa and, as a Canadian, the involvement of Canadian banks, mining companies and other business interests in South Africa and Namibia. I welcome the stand taken by the Canadian churches." - J. King Gordon (Past President, U.S. Association in Canada)
"I am please to associate myself with the Churches' business and have signed the slip." - Emmett M. Hall, C.C., Q.C., D.C.L., D.Med. (Saskatoon)
"I would be happy to have my name added to your list of supporters...and hope that your efforts will be effective in changing the role of the banks, and also of our government. Please note that I have signed...as an individual." - Kay MacPherson (President, the National Action Committee on the Status of Women)
The Churches will be represented at shareholders' meetings of all the major banks. Following is the schedule:
Toronto-Dominion Bank, Wednesday, December 7, 11am, Toronto-Dominion Centre Cinema
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Tuesday, December 13, 11 am, Commerce Hall
Bank of Nova Scotia, Wednesday, December 14, 11 am, Hotel Nova Scotia, Halifax
Royal Bank, Thursday, January 12, 11 am, Montreal
Bank of Montreal, Monday, January 16, 11 am, Chateau Champlain, Montreal
The full text of the statements will be available on the day of the meetings. The statements will vary because, contrary to the impression given by the banking community, there is evidence that there are differences in the attitude towards investment in South Africa on the part of some of the banks. It should be noted that some international banks in both Europe and the USA have made public policy statements on this matter. No major Canadian bank has, to this point.
For further information, contact:
Renate Pratt,
Co-ordinator,
Taskforce on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility,
600 Jarvis Street,
Toronto
923-1758
or
The Rev. Peter Hamel,
Consultant,
National Affairs,
Anglican Church of Canada,
924-9192 ext. 248
Notes
I wish to support the position taken by the Anglican, United, Roman Catholic and Lutheran Churches calling for a halt to Canadian bank loans to the government of South Africa and its agencies, until the imposition of apartheid is discontinued.
R.T. Affleck, Architect
Gregory Baum, Theologian, St. Michael's College
Pierre Berton, Author and Broadcaster
Edward Broadbent, Leader, New Democratic Party of Canada
Rosemary Brown, Member of B.C. Legislative Assembly
June Callwood, Broadcaster and Journalist
Dr. K. Chetty, Canada-Southern Africa Relief Committee
Pierre De Bane, M.P. for Matine, P.Q.
Geoffrey H. Durrant, Faculty of English, University of British Columbia
Georges Erasmus, President, Indian Brotherhood of the N.W.T.
Gordon Fairweather, Chairman, Canadian Human Rights Commission
Dr. Laing Ferguson, President, Amnesty International
Eugene Forsey, Senator
James Foulkes, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia
Carole Geller, Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission
King Gordon, Executive Member and Past President of United Nations Assoc. of Canada
Len Guy, B.C. Federation of Labour
Emmett Hall, Honourary President, Canadian Civil Liberties Association
Wilson Head, Scientist, York University, Toronto
Abigail Hoffman
Marlene Hunter, M.D.
Mel Hurtig, Publisher, Edmonton
William Hutt, Actor
Dr. A.M. Inglis, Canada-Southern Africa Relief Committee
Bruce Kidd, Professor, Physical Education, University of Toronto
William Kilbourn, Professor of History, York University
Laurier LaPierre, University Professor and Broadcaster
Margaret Laurence, Author
David Lewis, past leader, the New Democratic Party of Canada
Kathleen MacPherson
The Very Rev. Angus J. MacQueen, Chancellor, Mt. Allison University, N.S.
The Very Rev. N. Bruce McLeod, Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights Commission
Bennett Metcalfe, Journalist, B.C.
Joe Morris, President, Canadian Labour Congress
Christina Newman, Executive Editor, Saturday Night
Hon. Howard R. Pawley, former Manitoba Attorney General
Thomas Perry, Professor of Pharmacology, University of British Columbia
Walter Pitman, President, Ryerson Polytechical Institute, Toronto
Harry Rankin, Rankin & Company, Barristers and Solicitors, Vancouver, B.C.
Dr. Peter Richardson, Principal, University College, Toronto
Abraham Rotstein, Dept. of Political Economy, University of Toronto
Kathleen Ruff, Director, B.C. Human Rights Code
William Saywell, Principal, Innis College, Toronto
Lloyd R. Shaw, Chairman, L.E. Shaw Limited, Halifax, N.S.
Don Taylor, United Steelworkers of America
Murray Thomson, President, Canadian Council of International Co-operation
The Rev. G.E. Topshee, Director, Coady International Institute, N.S.
David Walsh, President, Realco Property Ltd., Toronto
Patrick Watson, Broadcaster and Journalist
Robin Wilson, Executive Director, Canadian University Service Overseas
Sandra Witherspoon, M.D., Vancouver, B.C.
* positions given for identification purposes only.
Subjects
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic sanctions - South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Corporate social responsibility - Canada
Taskforce on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR)
Less detail

Letters from Overseas : AIDS, crime and an ordination declined

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30626
Author
Myers, Bruce (Bruce Joseph Andrew), 1972-
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Fall
Author
Myers, Bruce (Bruce Joseph Andrew), 1972-
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Fall
Volume
10
Issue
3
Page
22-23
Notes
The author, a postulant for the Diocese of Quebec, is a radio news anchor in Montreal and a theological student at the Montreal Diocesan Theological College. He is serving an internship in the diocese of Grahamstown in South Africa. Myers describes South Africa as a beautiful and hospitable country but one which faces huge challenges. "HIV/AIDS is by far the major issue confronting this country. South Africa has the highest infection rate of any nation on the continent: 1,600 people die from it every day. One Anglican priest I spoke to this week told me that he buried five of his parishioners on a single day last week -- all victims of HIV/AIDS." Crime and violence are also huge and omnipresent problems. "Every store and ATM has a security guard, sometimes armed with billy clubs and a guard dog. Even our church hires a guard to keep watch over parishioners' cars while they are inside for the service". There is still great poverty and inequality of resources. "The dichotomy is huge and, I've discovered, still falls mostly along racial lines. Nearly 10 years after the fall of apartheid, whites seem predominantly well off, most blacks still struggling". "The church I'm at (St. Saviour's) is very active: there are six clergy. There's a big HIV/AIDS ministry, an active youth group, Mothers' Union, and more. There are two services on Sunday both well attended, although mostly divided along racial lines". The author also describes his attendance at a service of one of the indigenous African churches and how he "got to see firsthand the radically different way Christianity is evolving in this part of the world. Both churches still follow the Levitical laws of the Hebrew Bible, and take all the scriptures literally. So these Christians are kosher, worship on Saturday (the Sabbath), women's heads are covered in church, and animal sacrifice is still a significant part of their worship. At one service, a dozen chickens were sacrificed to the congregation's ancestors before we launched into a more-or-less normal service of Bible readings, hymns, a sermon, and `communion' -- but with holy water rather than wine".
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - South Africa
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church of the Province of Southern Africa. Diocese of Grahamstown
South Africa - Economic conditions
Violence - South Africa
Christianity and culture - China
African independent churches
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Messages and Greetings

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2575
Date
1980 March 19-21
Source
National Executive Council Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1980 March 19-21
Source
National Executive Council Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rt. Rev. J.C. Bothwell
Seconder
Dr. Betty C. Graham
Text
That
(a) this National Executive Council commends the Canadian Council of Churches and the Primate for the messages regarding the removal of the passport of Bishop Desmond Tutu.
(b) this National Executive Council expresses its very deep concern about the continued suppression of Christian witness in South Africa against the apartheid policies as evidenced in the imprisonment of the Rev. David Russell, and the removal of the passports of the Rt. Rev. Desmond Tutu and of the Rev. Allan Boesak. Such an action can only harm any attempts within the world community to try to be more understanding of the situation in South Africa. All of these persons are outstanding witnesses to the Christian belief in God's love for all men and for justice and peace between all, and we stand with them.
That this National Executive Council requests the Department of External Affairs to protest in the strongest terms the imprisonment of Father Russell and the removal of the passport of both Bishop Tutu and the Rev. Allan Boesak. CARRIED
Subjects
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-2021
Boesak, Allan (Allan Aubrey), 1946-
Russell, David (David Patrick Hamilton), 1938-
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and politics - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
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Motion re Trial of the Dean of Johannesburg

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4059
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [47]
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [47]
Mover
Very Reverend R.E. Ivany
Seconder
Reverend Canon T. Leadbeater
Text
Be it resolved that this General Synod requests the Primate's World Relief and Development Committee to consider giving financial support to the Dean of Johannesburg in his forthcoming trial as a means of expressing our opposition to the injustices of apartheid. CARRIED IN BOTH HOUSES
Notes
[Recorded as No. 47 in Acts of Synod, p. 68. List of Acts includes actions which are NOT resolutions/acts.]
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) Committee
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Ffrench-Beytagh, Gonville Aubie, 1912-1991
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38 records – page 1 of 4.