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Church in South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2954
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Hollis
Seconder
Crabb
Prologue
Bishop Bothwell presented a statement that was suggested be sent to the Church in South Africa and a second statement to go to the Government of Canada.
"In humility we wish to express our solidarity with you during this present time of torment. Your Prime Minister is reported to have said in October, 1976 that, `South Africa will continue to keep blacks out of the country's political life.' The established inequalities and injustices that flow daily from this intransigent position are well known by you and you have continually interpreted obedience to God as the necessity for speaking and standing against these indignities. In the words of Archbishop B. Burnett, `It is evident that there will not be the necessary change in the fabric of our society without the determined effort of black people.'
We rejoice that recent statements of the South African Council of Churches, the Christian Institute, and the Diocesan Council of Capetown [i.e. Cape Town] all firmly call for the holding of a fully representative national convention of all peoples of South Africa and condemn detention without charge or trial. We recognize in them and the statement of the seventeen Black Dutch Reformed Church ministers increasing unity and work for the liberation of all South Africans. The seventeen issued a call to their people in the words, `Let us not despair but confirm our joy and faith in Jesus Christ the Liberator,' that challenges us all.
We mourn with you for those who have fallen in the present crisis and will continue to pray and work for the release of persons detained without charges such as our Anglican sister in the faith, Mrs. Sally Motlana, a vice-President of the South Africa Council of Churches and one of the Presidents of the All Africa Council of Churches.
Your call to white South Africans particularly to recognize their responsibility for the sinful structures of Apartheid is also heard by us because of our complicity with them. We too take seriously the call to repentance, for our indifference and that of our government and economic interests have increased injustice in South Africa.
Your government, rather than coming to terms with her own people and the inevitability of change towards justice, has sought massive international assistance to weather the internal economic crisis, seriously aggravated by massive increases in defense and security spending. In February 1976 a $200 million loan was secured for the government owned Electric Supply Commission from 28 United States, European and Canadian banks, and a larger $500 million loan is being sought for balance-of-payment support at this time when there is a considerable fear of slowdown in foreign investment. Together with other Canadian Christians we pledge renewed efforts to terminate this direct support for the regime which oppresses the majority of your people.
The present open expression of dissent in South Africa demonstrates confidence in another power than racist oppression. It is a sign of the indomitable spirit and hope burning in the hearts of the vast majority of its black population and the substantial minority of whites. We pray that God will bless your efforts to support and sustain spirit and hope with the enriching gospel of Christ our Saviour."
Moved by Bothwell
Seconded by Graham
That this Statement be sent from this National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada to the Church in South Africa.
Text
Amendment
That a message of commendation be sent to the Archbishop of Cape Town expressing appreciation for the courageous statement in his pastoral letter of September 1, 1976. CARRIED
Notes
The Council requested that they receive the full documentation on this subject. (See Appendix 1)
Appendix 1
PASTORAL LETTER FROM THE ARCHBISHOP OF CAPE TOWN, TO BE READ AT ALL SERVICES ON SUNDAY, 5TH SEPTEMBER, OR WHERE THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE, ON SUNDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER.
(Embargoed to the Press until 12 noon on Sunday, 5/9/76)
Dear brothers and sisters in Christ,
In times of turmoil and stress our first responsibility is, as always, to be obedient to God. Faith that is rooted in obedience to Him strengthens and encourages us all because it asserts that "the light shines in the darkness and the darkness has not overcome it" (John 1:5).
If, moveover, we are to speak and act with the mind of Christ, we need to sift carefully the demands men make on us, to speak or to be silent; to act in a particular way, or even remain inactive. It is not at all difficult to act or react in times such as these in such a fashion as simply to demonstrate that we ourselves are part of the disease that needs healing.
It has nevertheless become needful to address ourselves both as Churchmen and as citizens and also to address our Government. With a deep sense of urgency and after careful deliberation your Diocesan Council at its meeting on 28th August, passed without a dissentient a resolution, the contents of which I now convey to you:
"In this time of crisis we mourn with the black community and all others who have suffered bereavement, injury, humiliation and material loss. We condemn the detention without charge or trial of persons thought to be leading the black struggle for justice and liberation.
We call on the white community in general and the government in particular to acknowledge that the policy of so-called separate development, which we do not recognise as the Will of God, has failed. We believe we are seeing in the present turmoil the judgment of God on this policy.
We call for the holding of a fully representative national convention that would prepare a new constitution based on full and equal human rights, participatory democracy and economic justice.
We call on all Church members to acknowledge their share of responsibility for the grave disorders of their society and to place themselves and their country unreservedly in the hands of God, and to allow His Spirit of power, love and discernment to re-direct them in the ways of justice and peace."
The resolution ends here. But if its effects end there it will have had only propaganda value. For that reason I have written to the Prime Minister and enclosed a copy of the resolution. It have made it clear to him, moreover, that we as a Church cannot address him on such a matter out of our own righteousness but from a conviction laid upon us by the Lord. For that reason also this cannot be the end of the matter.
Of one thing I am certain. God is calling us all to repentance. Unless in particular white Christians admit the wrongs they have done to black people and take action to redress them, there can be no possibility of healing in our land. We have failed grievously to act towards our fellow Christians and fellowmen as those beloved of God. We have been greedy and not shared our good things and opportunities with our brothers. We have been proud and failed to come alongside our brothers, nor have we shared with them in a determination to work for changes in our society. We have failed to recognize the worth to our Father of people who do not have our colour or traditions and we have not embraced them unreservedly as brothers. We have not shown them that we need them for our own growth as Christians.
Black Christians will certainly know themselves also as children of God needing repentance. "All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God" says St. Paul, and we need to ask God to deliver us all from seeing only the mote in our brother's eye. But at this moment it is those of us who exercise political power and benefit from the established inequalities of our society who bear a far greater responsibility for what we now experience.
It is evident nevertheless that there will not be the necessary changes in the fabric of our society without the determined efforts of black people. You too need God's resources to press for justice without rancour and to struggle for a better way of life without becoming the prisoners of hatred. You will need God's strength to strive and not to yield where your decisions are rightly based in God's will. You will need the gifts of God's love to retain the freedom to forgive.
It is relatively painless, however, to say what the Diocesan Council resolution says. During the last two or three decades we have made many excellent statements. But we have failed, by and large, to accept from God and to use the spiritual resources to do what we talk about. We can even be so absorbed by what we call the burning issues of the day, that we fail to perceive that the real issue for Christians is not simply the transformation of society, but whether or not we believe in God in such a way that within our fellowship we reflect the ethics of the Kingdom and become the means by which the Lord can transform our life together.
We, both priests and people, need to submit ourselves constantly to the searching scrutiny of God's Spirit in prayer, fasting and study of Holy Scripture to see whether we ourselves give expression to the power of the redeeming and healing love of God in all our relationships.
This is an exercise for those who have a strong social conscience as well as those who are deeply committed to personal evangelism, and most of all, for those who are involved in neither. Then we may manifest a Gospel which reveals the depth of our divine calling, and frees within us the unique resources and irreplaceable light from God to direct and sustain us in our search for a more humane social order.
And so I exhort you with St. Paul: "Stand fast in the faith. Quit you like men; be strong. Let all that you do be done in love" and the blessing of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, anoint and sustain you.
+ Bill Cape Town
Bishopscourt, Claremont, 7700.
1st September, 1976.
Subjects
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Soweto
Church of the Province of Southern Africa. Diocese of Cape Town
Burnett, Bill Bendyshe, 1917-
Less detail

Church in South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2955
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bothwell
Seconder
MacKenzie
Text
That the National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada commends to the Government of Canada for its statement on the Republic of South Africa delivered in the General Assembly of the United Nations on November 1, 1976 and urges clear action consonant with the words of the statement:
"The events of the past year demonstrate visibly that time remaining for effective peaceful change is growing shorter day by day. We believe that our individual and collective efforts must be intensified and harmonized -- we believe that no opportunity should be missed to expose the government of South Africa and its electorate to unanimous and relentless international pressures which demand action and change. Change is bound to come. South Africans of all races must face up to that fact and develop a new relationship. If conditions of chronic turbulence which risk deterioration into civil war, with its attendant toll of human tragedy are to be avoided, change must take place, not ten years hence, not five years hence, but now."
and requests the Primate to forward to the Government of Canada a more detailed comment in the light of previous actions by this Church and information available from Anglican and other sources.
The NEC urges the Canadian government publicly to discourage further bank or commercial loans by private or crown financial institutions to the Government of South Africa or any of its crown corporations or agencies.
The NEC requests the Government of Canada to indicate what concrete and specific steps it proposes to take both unilaterally and multilaterally to increase the international censure of South Africa. CARRIED
Subjects
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Foreign relations - South Africa
Less detail

[Former Anglican Dean of Johannesburg Tours Canada]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5123
Date
1972 September 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1972 September 29
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Arrest and trial in South Africa and conditions existing under the laws of apartheid, are described by the former Anglican Dean of Johannesburg, Canon Gonville Aubie ffrench-Beytagh, touring Canada from October 21 to November 13, visiting 15 Canadian cities.*
The Dean, accused of encouraging the violent overthrow of the government, was arrested in Johannesburg in January 1971 and held in solitary confinement for eight days. On November 1, 1971 he was convicted and sentenced to five years in jail but charges were subsequently dismissed in April 1972. The Dean then left South Africa and is now living in England.
Canon ffrench-Beytagh has been invited to Canada by a committee of Canadian deans of Anglican Cathedrals so that both churchmen and the general public of Canada can learn more about apartheid and its effect on the more-than-two-thirds of South Africa's population which is black. His visit is financed by the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund.
Over the past two decades the South African government has slowly stifled all normal channels for contact with Africans and all legitimate forms of active dissent. According to the English newspaper, the "Guardian," the net is now tightening on the church, the last white organization left with regular access to Africans as well as access to the world outside South Africa. It called the Dean's conviction a savage verdict, saying "a five-year prison sentence for giving money, clothing and food to the wives and families of political prisoners illustrates starkly the extent of the repression now practiced in South Africa's police state." A member of the World Council of Churches Program to Combat Racism, Mrs. Justice Jiagge of Ghana, has said "the crime of Christians is that we have allowed the South Africa situation to go on for so long and still do so little to stop it. If there is among Christians a feeling of solidarity with the human race, situations like South Africa will not exist."
The "Christian Century" suggested that the Dean's arrest was part of a stepped-up campaign to silence clergy criticism of government policies, especially racial apartheid. The article point out that some 50 clergymen had been subject to government penalties during the past 12 months.
The Chief Justice of the Appeals Court dismissing the Dean's conviction noted that although the Dean consistently opposed many laws, especially those enforcing apartheid, it was clear that he was no supporter of terrorism.
The Dean of Johannesburg believes that the doctrine of apartheid is "damnable heresy," and that "a man born black cannot come to the fullness of his humanity." He cites verses of St. Matthew 25 as a need for church involvement, "for I was hungry and you gave me food; I was thirsty, and you gave me drink; I was a stranger, and you took me in; I was in prison and you visited me."
The theory of apartheid is that each race should be able to develop separately along its own lines, in peace. But laws used to implement that theory involve hardship and injustice. No black South African has the right to vote, to strike or to bargain with his employers. This leaves him no legal way to change the discriminatory laws.
There is probably not another country in the world where distribution of income is so unequal. Africans was are 70% of the population, receive less than 20% of all income and live on 13% of the land. More than half of them live in white South Africa, in cities and suburban townships or on white farms, the remainder are crowded into "tribal reserves," known as "homelands." Those not living in reserves are nevertheless regarded as inhabitants of reserves and have no right of tenure in white South Africa. If a married man loses his job, his whole family can be ordered to live on a reserve even though his wife still has a job and his children are at school.
Since control of the land and economic power is in the hands of the whites, foreign investors in South Africa automatically develop a vested interest in maintaining the status quo.
Large corporations enroll whites from Europe to fill top jobs in South Africa and non-whites, despite personal qualifications, may not supervise whites.
Apartheid policies have been blamed for the country's growing economic difficulties. South African industry has not been able to make full and effective use of the large and willing reservoir of labour that it available to it. Better jobs and better pay for the African majority would not be bought at the expense of the European worker. On the contrary, "African advancement could certainly make possible much more rapid advancement for Europeans also," says Harry Oppenheimer, Chairman of the Anglo American Corporation of South Africa.
As dependence on black workers increases, more and more of them move into urban areas, fear grows in the minds of the white minority, and repression gets worse. Time is running out.
What the Dean of Johannesburg would most like to do is to discourage immigration to South Africa. Voices of African resistance too, have called for economic isolation until racial policies are changed. They are aware of the hardship that economic boycott would entail.
The late Chief Albert Luthuli, Nobel prize winner and former head of the African National Congress, who was, for many years, forbidden to speak or write, said, "economic boycott is a method which would shorten the day of bloodshed and that the suffering would be a price we are willing to pay. In any case, we suffer already, our children are often undernourished and at times we die at the whim of a policeman." Canadian Anglicans have been asked by their General Synod, "to demonstrate their concern for all their South African brothers by refusing to purchase or consume any product manufactured, processed or grown directly or indirectly in or through the Republic of South Africa."
The Central Committee of the World Council of Churches meeting in August this year doubled its special fund to combat racism and voted to liquidate its financial stake in all corporations doing business with white-ruled African countries.
The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Most Reverend E.W. Scott says, in welcoming Canon ffrench-Beytagh, "some of the creative church leaders in South Africa have voiced with courage the Judeo-Christian conviction that law and order should be the servant of justice not the structure of oppression and discrimination. This principle clearly challenges apartheid. Here on this continent, we need to recognize that the same principle should lead us to be constantly evaluating the goals being sought by those who call for law and order - are they seeking justice or preservation of privilege?"
* Toronto, Halifax, Fredericton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Kingston, Hamilton, London, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Vancouver, Victoria, Edmonton and Calgary.
- 30 -
For more information, contact:
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
924-9192
or
The Rev. Robert D. MacRae
Secretary, The Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Subjects
Ffrench-Beytagh, Gonville Aubie, 1912-1991
Apartheid - South Africa
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Christianity and politics - South Africa
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
Less detail
Author
Carter, John S. (John Stanley), 1921-
Publication Date
[1977]
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 5700.6 C3 G5 1977
Author
Carter, John S. (John Stanley), 1921-
Place
[s.l.]
Publisher
[n.p.]
Publication Date
[1977]
Physical_Description
48 p. ; 21 x 14.6 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Cover title.
Includes bibliographical references.
Contents: Introduction / John Carter, Johannesburg, January 1977 -- Foreword / Tim i.e. Timothy Bavin, Bishop of Johannesburg -- Proper Words: Speech Day, St. Martin's School, Rosettenville -- The Difference: Confirmation, Johannesburg -- Down to Earth: Parish Meeting, Vereeniging -- What is God Saying to Us ? [Dean Gonville ffrench-Beytaugh] -- Alexandra: Protest meeting, Saxonwold School, April 1972 -- Desecration : [University of Witwaterswand, 5 June 1972] -- Crooked Christmas" South African Outlook, February 1974 -- Anglicanism -- The Man of God: The Foundation of His Faith: Salvation Army Officers' Conference, Magaliesberg -- Christian Holiness: St. Benedict's House, Rosettenville, 1976 -- Christian Involvement -- Let There Be Light: St. Mary's Cathedral, Johannesburg, Easter -- Epilogue: The Rich and the Poor: [re Soweto Massacre] St. Mary's Cathedral, Johannesburg, June 27, 1976
A collection of 13 brief addresses and sermons delivered by the author, the first Suffragan Bishop of Johannesburg, between 1971 and 1976.
Subjects
Church of the Province of Southern Africa - 20th century
Sermons, English - South Africa
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Call Number
BX 5700.6 C3 G5 1977
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Motion re Trial of the Dean of Johannesburg

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4059
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [47]
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [47]
Mover
Very Reverend R.E. Ivany
Seconder
Reverend Canon T. Leadbeater
Text
Be it resolved that this General Synod requests the Primate's World Relief and Development Committee to consider giving financial support to the Dean of Johannesburg in his forthcoming trial as a means of expressing our opposition to the injustices of apartheid. CARRIED IN BOTH HOUSES
Notes
[Recorded as No. 47 in Acts of Synod, p. 68. List of Acts includes actions which are NOT resolutions/acts.]
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) Committee
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Ffrench-Beytagh, Gonville Aubie, 1912-1991
Less detail
Publication Date
[1979?]
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
DT 703 N35 1979
Place
[Geneva]
Publisher
International University Exchange Fund
Publication Date
[1979?]
Physical_Description
127 p. : ill. ; 29.7 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Cover title.
"The 'Namibia Dossier' is published by the South African Information Programme of the International University Exchange Fund on behalf of the group inside South Africa who produced the original Dossier, which was banned by the authorities. During 1978 the National Union of South African Students (NUSAS) published a 'Focus on Namibia' which, in order to stimulate debate brought together material already published. But the South African government, in its continued assault on any publications which do not reflect the official propaganda lies, banned even this 'Focus'. A concerned group of young South Africans therefore decided to publish the Dossier to try to circumvent the government's attempts at mind control. .... Some more recent material has been added to the original Dossier but its design is maintained so as to enable separate parts to be easily reproduced and so more widely distributed internally. At the same time because the Dossier represents a unique collection of material on Namibia -- and is an example of what youth resistance movements inside South Africa are producing themselves -- the IUEF is also making available a limited number of copies for international distribution". -- inside front cover.
Contents: Foreword dated 1979 -- Introduction dated 1978 -- Background -- Turnhalle Puppets -- Atrocities -- Constitution -- Solidarity.
Series
South African information programme
Added Entry
International University Exchange Fund
Focus on Namibia
Subjects
Namibia - Politics and government - 1946-1990
Apartheid - Namibia
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Call Number
DT 703 N35 1979
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

[Primate's Response to Sentencing of Anglican Dean of Johannesburg]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5101
Date
1971 November 2
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1971 November 2
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Edward Scott, today expressed "deep concern" and dismay over the sentencing of the Anglican Dean of Johannesburg to five years in prison for anti-apartheid activities in South Africa.
Archbishop Scott sent telegrams of support both to Dean Gonville ffrench-Beytagh in Johannesburg and to the Anglican Archbishop of Capetown the Most Rev. Robert Selby Taylor.
The telegram to Dean ffrench-Beytagh read:
"We are deeply saddened to learn of the court decision yesterday."
"May you find courage and faith from those around the world who will follow you in your appeal to the higher court."
"Be assured of the deep concern and continual prayers of Anglicans in Canada as you face the days that lie ahead."
The telegram to the Archbishop of Capetown read:
"The bishops, clergy and laity of the Anglican Church of Canada, representing more than one million persons, through me, offer their support and prayers to the Church of the Province of South Africa and express their dismay at the sentencing of Dean ffrench-Beytagh. Please convey to your people our deep concern and continued support."
Dean ffrench-Beytagh was convicted under the Terrorism Act in South Africa on two counts of incitement to violence and once of channelling money from abroad to banned persons and organizations in white-dominated South Africa.
The 59-year old cleric has received funds from Anglicans throughout the world in anticipation of an appeal to a higher court.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
Mr. Michael O'Meara
Director of Communications
The Anglican Church of Canada
600 Jarvis Street
Toronto 285, Ontario
Subjects
Ffrench-Beytagh, Gonville Aubie, 1912-1991
Taylor, Robert Selby, 1909-1995
Apartheid - South Africa
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
Christianity and politics - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Less detail
Date
1977 November 2 - 4
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1977 November 2 - 4
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
The Rt. Rev. L. Garnsworthy
Seconder
The Rt. Rev. H. Stiff
Prologue
"The Rev. C. Raymond stated briefly the reasons and concerns which formed the background of this Service of Witness Against Repression in South Africa.
Text
"That this matter be off the record." CARRIED
Notes
The Rev. Peter Hamel spoke, providing further detail.
Subjects
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Human rights - South Africa
Canada - Foreign relations - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 50
Date
1975 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 50
Mover
Rt. Rev. H.L. Nutter
Seconder
Dr. L.L.Whytehead
Prologue
South Africa
The courtesies of the Synod were extended to the Rev. Canon Lorenzo Harrison, World Mission Sub-Committee; Mrs. Sheila Connell, Primate's World Relief and Development Fund; and the Rev. Laurence Scyner, Unit of Public and Social Responsibility.
The report on South Africa was presented by the Rt. Rev. H. Nutter, who invited Canon Harrison, Mrs. Connell and Mr. Scyner to speak on their recent visit to South Africa. Also included in the team that visited South Africa were the Ven. E.K. Clarke and the Rev. Tom Anthony.
Text
"That this General Synod condemns apartheid and the political, economic and social systems currently maintained in Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Namibia (South-West Africa) and South Africa as being white racist and therefore contrary to God's will and the Christian Faith. We therefore call upon all Anglicans and other Christians in this country and throughout the world to renew every effort to increase the pressure on the governments in South Africa and Zimbabwe to change radically their policies so as to eliminate racism. We call on all Christians everywhere to support by prayer and actions the faithful witness of those within Southern Africa who seek to eliminate racism."
CARRIED Act 50
Subjects
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Zimbabwe
Racism - Namibia
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Zimbabwe - Politics and government - 1965-1979
Zimbabwe - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Social Action Resolutions: South Africa

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4057
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [46]
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Act [46]
Mover
Mr. W.R. Shepherd
Seconder
Canon W.E. Askew
Prologue
Moved by Mr. G. Fairweather
Seconded by: Reverend H. Taylor
Whereas it is stated in "Foreign Policy for Canadians" that 'Canadian delegations (to the United Nations) became increasingly sympathetic to the arguments of the anti-colonialists' (1) and that 'The Republic of South Africa is possessed by the cancer of apartheid' (2) and
"Whereas Canada 'has joined in condemnations of apartheid and has complied with Security Council resolutions calling for a volunteer embargo on the supply of arms to South Africa' (3) and
"Whereas Canada maintains commonwealth preferential trade agreements with the Republic of South Africa, despite the fact that South Africa withdrew from the Commonwealth (ten years ago) (4) and
"Recognizing the inconsistency of spending public funds by Canada to promote trade and investment in South Africa (5)
"Therefore be it resolved that General Synod urge the Government of Canada
(a) to make credible its professed policies so that the economic growth of Canadians will not be achieved at the price of compromising the concern of Canadians for black Africans who are victims of apartheid;
(b) to refrain from encouraging business, trade, and investment in the Republic of South Africa even if it means a slower economic growth for Canadians; and
(c) to foster the goal of social justice for black people as the major policy theme for negotiations with the Republic of South Africa.
(d) to end preferential tariffs with the Republic of South Africa".
An amendment was then proposed as follows:
Text
"That an amendment be added at the end of (d), as a further section to the total Resolution:
"(e) "And be it further Resolved that because of our Christian belief in the essential dignity of each and every human personality, General Synod asks all members of the Anglican Church of Canada to demonstrate their concern for all their South African brothers by refusing to purchase or consume any product manufactured, processed or grown directly or indirectly in or through the Republic of South Africa".
The amendment was put and was CARRIED IN BOTH HOUSES.
The motion, as amended, was put and was CARRIED IN BOTH HOUSES.
Notes
[Recorded as No. 46 in Acts of Synod, p. 68. List of Acts includes actions which are NOT resolutions/acts.]
Subjects
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
South Africa - Politics and government - 1961-1978
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Foreign economic relations - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - South Africa
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.