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Aboriginal Anglicans

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article19347
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1995 Lent
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1995 Lent
Issue
77
Page
15
Notes
Photo with caption "The delegation from British Columbia at the second Native Convocation, a national gathering of Aboriginal Anglicans [held 1-10 August 1993]. At this event, Archbishop Michael Peers formally apologized on behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada for injustices done to Aboriginal people."
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (2nd : 1993 : Kenora, Ont.)
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Anglican Church of Canada. Sacred Circle (2nd : 1993 : Kenora, Ont.)
Apologies - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Administration and Finance Committee

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official986
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Most Rev. D.W. Hambidge
Seconder
Canon C. Alexander
Prologue
Moved by: Rt. Rev. E.K. Lackey
Seconded by: Rt. Rev. R. Ferris
That this National Executive Council request the Primate to establish a task force as soon as possible to determine ways of opening our national church structure to be receptive to any decision made by Anglican Native people in Canada meeting in Convocation. In particular this task force will make recommendations to the National Executive Council concerning the possibility of a separate jurisdiction for Native people within the Anglican Church of Canada and the possibility of establishing an episcopate for a Native person in any such jurisdiction.
Text
That the second portion of the motion be deleted. CARRIED
Amendment - That the second portion of the motion be deleted. CARRIED
Notes
The motion now reads: That this National Executive Council request the Primate to establish a task force as soon as possible to determine ways of opening our national church structure to be receptive to any decision made by Anglican Native people in Canada meeting in Convocation.
The motion as amended was put and CARRIED
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (1st : 1988 : Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask.)
Sacred Circle
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. National Indigenous Anglican Bishop
Less detail

Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report: Communications and Information Resources: Telling the Anglican story to the world

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38401
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Volume
139
Issue
5
Page
insert 7
Notes
"The Anglican Church of Canada was in the forefront of Canadian Christian denominations when it established it video arm in 1988 under Lisa Barry. A vibrant component of the church's Communications and Information Resources Department, Anglican Video has always been committed to capturing the stories out in the field rather than recording them in the studio. Its first big project was documenting the inaugural Native Convocation (now called Sacred Circle), a national gathering of indigenous and other Anglicans held over two weeks in Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask., in 1988. Video is an optimal fit for working with indigenous people, says Barry, 'because First nations culture is rooted in oral tradition'. The church's video arm has also reached out to encourage the participation of Anglicans at large. In 2008's award-winning Amazing Grace project, for example, it used social media to collect footage of groups across Canada performing the world's best-known hymn. The project raised more than $100,000 for suicide prevention in northern Canada. 'People were even using their cellphones to send in their versions', says Barry". "Anglican Video's story has been one of rapid technological change. In the early years, Barry could scarcely lift the bulky cameras of the day and had to hire help. Now she travels light with digital camcorders and sometimes she does the shooting herself. She can edit footage on a laptop anywhere and upload it immediately, instead of sending tapes to Toronto". "We remain committed to telling the Anglican story to the world', says Barry. 'It's the most important thing we can do'."
Eight page insert (1-8) with May 2013 issue of Anglican Journal. Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report. Insert produced by Resources for Mission Dept.
Subjects
Anglican Video
Barry, Lisa
Anglican Church of Canada. Communications and Information Resources Dept.
Video recordings - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (1st : 1988 : Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask.)
Sacred Circle
Amazing Grace Project
Technology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican leader apologizes to aboriginal people for residential schools

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1944
Date
1993 August 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1993 August 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Minaki, ON Sunday, August 8, 1993 -- The primate of the Anglican Church of Canada has apologized to aboriginal Anglicans for the "pain and hurt" they experienced in church-run residential schools.
"I have felt shame and humiliation as I have heard of suffering inflicted by my people, and as I think of the part our church played in that suffering," Archbishop Michael Peers told nearly 150 native people gathered here for the Anglican Church's second National Native Convocation.
"I accept and I confess before God and you, our failures in the residential schools. We failed you. We failed God. I am sorry, more than I can say, that we were part of a system which took you and your children from home and family ... that we tried to remake you in our image ... that in our schools so many were abused, physically, sexually, culturally and emotionally."
The apology came on the sixth day of a week-long gathering of Aboriginal Anglicans from across the country. Earlier in the week, the gathering had spent two days listening to participants tell of loneliness and abuse at Anglican-run residential schools, and of family destruction, loss of language and identity, alcoholism and suicides, continuing to this day in the aftermath of the residential school experience.
On the seventh day of the convocation, the elders acknowledged and accepted the primate's apology. "It was offered from his heart with sincerity, sensitivity, compassion and humility," said elder Vi Smith, speaking during a closing worship service. "We receive it in the same manner."
Between 1820 and 1970, the Anglican Church administered as many as 26 different residential schools for aboriginal people. Although they were run by the church, the schools were funded by the federal government under the Indian Act.
The church's National Executive Council (NEC) had requested the primate to make an apology at an appropriate time and place. After listening to former students share their stories earlier in the week, he felt this was the time to apologize. He also pledged to work with native people to continue the healing. "I know how often you have heard words which have been empty because they have not been accompanied by actions", he said. He also asked diocesan bishops to continue the healing locally.
The primate acknowledged that without healing for the whole church and its non-aboriginal members, including himself, "we will continue the same attitudes that have done such damage in the past".
In 1991, NEC established a Residential Schools Working Group to focus on "reconciliation and healing". The church has provided financial support for healing initiatives arising in aboriginal communities and has done educational work among both native and non-native communities about the reality and effects of the residential schools.
-30-
Full text of apology and response enclosed. For further information, contact: Doug Tindal, Anglican Church of Canada (416) 924-9199 ext. 286
Notes
A Message from the Primate to the National Native Convocation Minaki, Ontario, Friday, August 6, 1993
My Brothers and Sisters:
Together here with you I have listened as you have told your stories of the residential schools.
I have heard the voices that have spoken of pain and hurt experienced in the schools, and of the scars which endure to this day.
I have felt shame and humiliation as I have heard of suffering inflicted by my people, and as I think of the part our church played in that suffering.
I am deeply conscious of the sacredness of the stories that you have told and I hold in the highest honour those who have told them.
I have heard with admiration the stories of people and communities who have worked at healing, and I am aware of how much healing is needed.
I also know that I am in need of healing, and my own people are in need of healing, and our church is in need of healing. Without that healing, we will continue the same attitudes that have done such damage in the past.
I also know that healing takes a long time, both for people and for communities.
I also know that it is God who heals, and that God can begin to heal when we open ourselves, our wounds, our failures and our shame to God. I want to take one step along that path here and now.
I accept and I confess before God and you, our failures in the residential schools. We failed you. We failed ourselves. We failed God.
I am sorry, more than I can say, that we were part of a system which took you and your children from home and family.
I am sorry, more than I can say, that we tried to remake you in our image, taking from you your language and the signs of your identity.
I am sorry, more than I can say, that in our schools so many were abused physically, sexually, culturally and emotionally.
On behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, I present our apology.
I do this at the desire of those in the Church like the National Executive Council, who know some of your stories and have asked me to apologize.
I do this in the name of many who do not know these stories.
And I do this even though there are those in the church who cannot accept the fact that these things were done in our name.
As soon as I am home, I shall tell all the bishops what I have said, and ask them to co-operate with me and with the National Executive Council in helping this healing at the local level. Some bishops have already begun this work.
I know how often you have heard words which have been empty because they have not been accompanied by actions. I pledge to you my best efforts, and the efforts of our church at the national level, to walk with you along the path of God's healing.
The work of the Residential Schools Working Group, the video, the commitment and the effort of the Special Assistants to the Primate for this work, the grants available for healing conferences, are some signs of that pledge, and we shall work for others.
This is Friday, the day of Jesus' suffering and death. It is the anniversary of the first atomic bomb at Hiroshima, one of the most terrible injuries ever inflicted by one people on another.
But even atomic bombs and Good Friday are not the last word. God raised Jesus from the dead as a sign that life and wholeness are the everlasting and unquenchable purpose of God.
Thank you for listening to me.
+ Michael, Archbishop and Primate
Response to the Primate at the National Native Convocation Delivered by Vi Smith on behalf of the elders and participants Minaki, Ontario, Saturday, August 7, 1993
On behalf of this gathering, we acknowledge and accept the apology that the Primate has offered on behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada.
It was offered from his heart with sincerity, sensitivity, compassion and humility. We receive it in the same manner. We offer praise and thanks to our Creator for his courage.
We know it wasn't easy. Let us keep him in our hearts and prayers, that God will continue to give him the strength and courage to continue with his tasks.
Subjects
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Education
Indian residential schools - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Apologies - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (2nd : 1993 : Kenora, Ont.)
Sacred Circle
Anglican Church of Canada. Residential Schools Working Group
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Less detail

Anglican Video production honoured

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8255
Date
2003 May 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2003 May 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO - May 27, 2003 -- In a gala evening event in Toronto on Saturday, May 24th [2003], Anglican Video was honoured with an award from the Canadian Corporate Television Association for the video program "Gathering at the River" (2002).
The national video competition received hundreds of entries from across Canada: "Gathering at the River" won a Bronze Award in the "under $30,000 category".
The video was produced by Lisa Barry for the diocese of Rupert's Land Indigenous Council. It documents an historic gathering of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Anglicans engaged in a process of healing and reconciliation.
In her acceptance speech, Ms. Barry acknowledged all who participated in the "Sacred Circle" depicted in the video for their "honesty and courage in sharing their stories".
"Gathering at the River", a 30-minute video, is available from the Anglican Book Centre, 600 Jarvis St., Toronto, ON M4Y 2J6 (416) 924-1332 or toll free (in Canada) 1-800-268-1168.
- 30 -
Contact: Lisa Barry, Senior Producer, Anglican Video, 416-924-9199 ext. 295; lbarry@national.anglican.ca
Photographs of the awards ceremony are available from Becky Boucher, 416-924-9199 ext. 236; bboucher@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Anglican Video
Awards
Gathering at the River [Video recording]
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Manitoba
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Barry, Lisa
Indian residential schools - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Video recordings in religion - Anglican Church of Canada
Video tapes in religion - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Video wins ITVA Award

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2100
Date
1994 April 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1994 April 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
April 11, 1994
Anglican Video has received its second Silver Birch Award for excellence in video production, for "Dancing the Dream", a documentary about the Native Convocation held last year. Lisa Barry (Writer/Director/Producer), Gideon Musa (Director of Photography) and Janet Thomas (Production Manager) were able to accept the award in person at the ITVA Canada Awards Gala in Vancouver last weekend, since they were on location taping other works-in-progress for Anglican Video.
ITVA Canada is a professional association for video and television communicators. "Dancing the Dream" was one of 159 entries in the "Information" category, one of 57 to go on to the second level of judging, and one of two ultimately selected for the Silver Birch Award in that category. ITVA also awards gold and bronze counterparts to the Silver Birch. "The winners were all of excellent calibre, so we felt great !" Lisa said of the event.
Last year Anglican Video received the Silver Birch for "Search for Healing," a documentary about the impact of residential schools on the aboriginal community.
- 30 -
For further information, contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286
Subjects
Anglican Video
Dancing the Dream [Videorecording]
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (2nd : 1993 : Kenora, Ont.)
Sacred Circle
Less detail

Bishops say church needs to address issue of unpaid priests : Nearly half of clergy from Council of the North dioceses are non-stipendiary

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35897
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 October
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 October
Volume
135
Issue
8
Page
1, 3
Notes
"The whole church will need to address the issue of non-stipendiary (unpaid) priests, according to Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and bishops from the Council of the North. 'It's clear to me that this is a matter of justice,' Archbishop Hiltz told more that 200 First Nations, Metis and Inuit delegates to the 6th Indigenous Sacred Circle gathered here [Port Elgin, Ont.] last August 9 to 15 [2009]. He was responding to concerns raised repeatedly at the gathering about the non-payment of clergy, many of whom are aboriginal". "The national church has no overall statistics of how many of 3,861 clergy are non-stipendiary. About 47 per cent (168 out of 358) of clergy from Council of the North dioceses are non-stipendiary".
Subjects
Nonstipendiary clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Salaries
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
Native ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (6th : 2000 : Port Elgin, Ont.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Indigenous Circle (6th : 2000 : Port Elgin, Ont.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Sacred Circle (6th : 2009 : Port Elgin, Ont.)
Less detail

Conversations with the Primate: Indigenous Anglicans `moving forward'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9062
Date
2005 November 4
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2005 November 4
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, Nov. 4, 2005
The decision by indigenous Anglicans to seek the appointment of a national bishop to provide pastoral support to indigenous communities is hailed as "a historic moment" by Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, the Canadian Primate, in a new webcast, which will be posted to the church's national website next week.
In the webcast, entitled "+Andrew: Conversations with the Primate", Archbishop Hutchison, who attended last summer's 5th Sacred Circle in Pinawa, Man., contrasts the gathering to previous Sacred Circles which have dealt mostly with the pain and anger caused by the legacy of native residential schools.
While the pain and anger still exist, the Canadian Primate said that there was also evident at last summer's gathering a desire and determination to move forward. The unanimous request for a national bishop to be appointed within a year is symptomatic of this desire, Archbishop Hutchison says.
"+Andrew: Conversations with the Primate" is a communications tool Archbishop Hutchison is using to speak to church members in an informal way and to solicit comments and feedback from viewers. The webcasts are taped and produced by Anglican Video and financially assisted by the Anglican Foundation.
The webcasts can be accessed from the home page of the General Synod website (www.anglican.ca) where they can be viewed or downloaded for viewing later or for sharing.
Viewers are invited to respond to Archbishop Hutchison by writing him at Andrew@national.anglican.ca
- 30 -
For more information, please contact: Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Director of Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 306; scarriere@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Native bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Webcasting - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hutchison, Andrew S. (Andrew Sandford), 1938-
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Indigenous Circle (5th : 2005 : Pinawa, Man.)
Less detail

Council on Native Affairs

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official972
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rt. Rev. G.F. Woolsey
Seconder
Rt. Rev. C.J. Lawrence
Text
That this National Executive Council request the Primate, in consultation with the Chairman of the Council on Native Affairs to name a small planning group to explore implications and possibilities for the Native people to meet in 'convocation'. CARRIED
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (1st : 1988 : Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Council on Native Affairs
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Sacred Circle
Less detail

66 records – page 1 of 7.