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[Anglican Church of Canada Support of World Council of Churches]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3154
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immediate release -- October 12, 1977
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" or "liberation movements" by still others.
In an effort to clarify the situation a lengthy position paper has been prepared by the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and some of its staff members. We enclose the full text of the paper for your information and hope you will keep it on file should there be further interest on the part of your readers or audience.
We would point out several highlights of the paper. Much misunderstanding has been created because the Anglican Church of Canada supports the World Council of Churches which, in turn, makes grants to groups such as the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO). The paper points out that any such grants do not come from General WCC funds or even from the General Relief and Development Fund.
There is, in the WCC, a special Program to Combat Racism, which has a separate fund, maintained by special contributions from individuals, groups and churches given specifically for this purpose from which grants are made. No grant is given until strict criteria are met. These criteria are meant to insure that the grants are used for humanitarian purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided releases other funds for military purposes. Since the WCC knows what much of the money is used for - support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies - they are confident that it is being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purposes, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
In its first six years, the fund for the Programme to Combat Racism received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to groups on every continent. Roughly one-half of this went to Africa. There is one interesting facet of this for concerned Canadian Anglicans. The Anglican Church of Canada has contributed $10,000 annually to this Programme. Between 1970 and 1976, the Programme to Combat Racism has made amongst its grants, these:
The Inuit (Eskimo) Tapirisat of Canada - 1971 - $2,500.00
The National Indian Brotherhood (on behalf of the Cree) - 1973-4 - $12,500.00
The Indian Brotherhood of the N.W.T. - 1973 - $7,500.00
The Committee for Original Peoples Entitlement - 1976 - $10,000.00
For further information, please contact:
Richard J. Berryman
Media Consultant
The Anglican Church of Canada
600 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192 ext. 253
Notes
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA POSITION PAPER ON THE WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES PROGRAM TO COMBAT RACISM
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches, was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" by others and "liberation movements" by others. These groups are all involved in a struggle against "racism."
The Churches because they believe that "God has created of one blood all nations of people," and because they believe human beings are made in the image of God, and are therefore of value and worth have, particularly in the last quarter century pressed for the recognition of the need for conversations between the aggrieved majorities of Southern Africa and their minority governments. This separation has in many instances, particularly in the cases of South Africa and Rhodesia, existed in extreme form because racism has been structured into law. The clear preference of the Churches and the vast majority of those involved in a search for a change has been to seek non-violent change. But within the broadly based groups seeking change there have been and are some elements which have come to believe that the necessary changes will not come about by non-violent means, and also some individuals and groups who under extreme provocation in particular instances have resorted to violence. Such groups and actions are also to be discovered in the historical development of Britain, Canada and the U.S.A. -- in fact of virtually every country in the world.
In Africa some black groups have resorted to war always against huge odds, only when other methods of achieving change have been exhausted -- when they have seen other methods have been increasingly restricted by such actions as banning of distribution of literature, of the right to meet together, and to organize, and now more and more they are suffering personal detention and harassment. The most recent example of this is the case of Steve Biko, a prominent young leader devoted to non-violence whose death occurred during imprisonment.
Stories of brutality by liberation movements have been publicized but these can be matched and perhaps exceeded by stories of brutality involving violent oppression, torture, and death on the part of ruling governments over many years. But trading of atrocity stories accomplishes very little, if anything. Three things need to be recognized.
1. Violence does exist.
2. Violence of itself cannot create a better or more just world, and all too often violence leaders to counter violence in an ascending scale.
3. Today it is recognized that very often there is a high level of violence in many institutionalized structures, particularly in Africa.
But violence has been and is a part of history and there have been times when violence has destroyed a repressive situation and provided an opportunity to develop something new in its place. There have also been times when violence has been used to destroy hopeful conditions and to bring about oppression and exploitation. The place of violence and non-violence in social change is a complex one and one which the World Council of Churches has been studying carefully and, I believe, responsibly (see attached document).
Even as this study has been progressing, the World Council, because of the Christian call to stand on the side of the oppressed and to work for liberation, which was the ter[m] in which Jesus described his ministry:
"And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he opened the book he found the place where it was written, The Spirit of the Lord in [i.e. is] upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord. And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears." (Luke 4:17-21)
The World Council has sought to take positive action to identify with those who are struggling against racism in many parts of the world through a special program designed to combat racism. This program has three sections.
1. An administrative section with three staff members which initiates studies.
2. A program section with projects undertaken by church groups designed to combat racism as it is found in particular forms and places.
3. Grants made from a special fund which was formed by an initial grant from the WCC and maintained since then by special contributions made by individuals, groups and Churches who give money directly to this fund for its stated purposes. In its first six years the fund received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to organizations and groups in various parts of the world, part of whose program is designed to combat racism. Grants to such groups have been made on every continent. They are applied for, but are not given until the organizations agree to use the grants according to strict criteria as follows:
-1. The purpose of the organizations must not be inconsonant with the general purposes of the WCC and its units, and the grants are to be used for humanitarian activities (i.e. social, health and educational purposes, legal aid, etc.).
-2. The proceeds of the Fund shall be used to support organizations that combat racism, rather than welfare organizations that alleviate the effects of racism and which would normally be eligible for support from other units of the World Council of Churches.
-3. (a) The focus of grants should be on raising the level of awareness and strengthening the organizational capability of the racially oppressed people.
- (b) In addition, we recognize the need to support organizations that align themselves with the victims of racial injustice and pursue the same objectives.
4. The grants are intended as an expression of commitment by the PCR to the cause of economic, social and political justice, which these organizations promote.
5.(a) The situation in Southern Africa is recognized as a priority due to the overt and intensive nature of white racism and the increasing awareness on the part of the oppressed in their struggle for liberation.
- (b) In the selection of other areas we have taken account of those places where the struggle is most intense and where a grant might make a substantial contribution to the process of liberation, particularly where racial groups are in imminent danger of being physically or culturally exterminated.
- (c) In considering applications from organizations in countries of white and affluent majorities, we have taken not only of those where political involvement precludes help from other sources.
6. Grants should be made with due regard to where they can have the maximum effect: token grants should not be made unless there is a possibility of their eliciting a substantial response from other organizations.
The geographic area where the grants have led to much discussion is Africa. Southern Africa has received approximately one half of the grants made thus far. Here there has been no case where it was ever proven that the grants were used for military purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided released other funds for military purposes. Since we know what much of the money is used for -- support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies -- we are confident that they are being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purpose, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
Three things are clearly evident. One, a hopeful one, is that many people are concerned about the growing use of violence and of how the Churches should be responding to it. As long as violence exists, Churches and Church people must grapple with this reality and try to sort out how to respond to this reality with Christian insights. Christians do not share a common mind about this. The position Christians take is often greatly influenced by the context or conditions under which they live and by the alternative courses of action which are open or closed to them. As understanding of this fact grows the polarization within the Churches becomes less.
Second, certain groups seem clearly involved in opposing the program to combat racism and to focus attention upon it as a way to keep general attention away from some of the underlying causal conditions which lead to violence.
Third, to set violence and non-violence as they relate to social change, as the only two positions and in complete opposition is to ignore reality. They are better viewed as the two extremes of an arc in which there are a wide variety of shades of opinion and of action. The following Social Involvement Rating Scale helps to identify some of the modes of action open to individuals and groups within society and the Church. Studied carefully, it helps us gain a deeper understanding of a complex issue and also to identify where we stand and why.
SOCIAL INVOLVEMENT RATING SCALE
1. 'Non-involvement': Conscious avoidance of any involvement in social and political activities.
2. 'Reactive involvement': Involvement in social and political activities occurs mainly when the church is in an established position but when institutional power is threatened or influence is eroded due to social change processes. Involvement can either by [i.e. be] directly or indirectly political.
3. 'Active Personal Involvement': Involvement is positive (not reactive), but limited to personal issues not seen as related to the social structure. Action is 'non political' and is concerned with individual development and improvement of personal welfare services.
4. 'Active Social Involvement' (concensus) [i.e. consensus]: Involvement is positive, but extending beyond personal issues seeking incremental, gradual change in the social structure and attitudes by educational methods using democratic processes.
5. 'Active Involvement in Structural Change' (conflict): Involvement is characterised by greater political activism using confronting techniques to achieve incremental but more rapid evolutionary changes in social structure.
6. 'Indirect Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using non-violent techniques aimed at the peaceful overthrow of existing political and social structures.
7. 'Direct Active Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using techniques aimed at the violent overthrow of existing oppressive political and social structures.
[Graphic showing an arc graph with labels from left to right] Non-involvement, Reactive Involvement, Active Personal Involvement, Active Social Involvement (consensus), Active Involvement in structural change (conflict), Indirect Involvement in revolution, Direct Active Involvement in revolution - Adapted from a scale developed by the Reverend Peter J. Hollingsworth, Melbourne, Australia.
Subjects
Carr, Burgess A. (Burgess Alpha), 1935-2012
All Africa Conference of Churches
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism. Special Fund
Racism - Africa
Racism - Canada
Racism - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - South Africa
Violence - Africa
Violence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Christianity and politics
Less detail

Apartheid is a heresy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog8700
Publication Date
1983
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
DT 763 A63 1983
Place
Grand Rapids MI
Publisher
William B. Eerdmans
Publication Date
1983
Physical_Description
xx, 184 p. ; 20.8 x 13.3 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Edited by John W. De Gruchy and Charles Villa-Vicencio".
"First published 1983 in Southern Africa by David Philip, Publisher, South Africa and in the United Kingdom by Lutterworth Press, England. This American edition published 1983 through special arrangement with David Philip, Publisher, by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co." -- verso of t.-p.
"Beyers' Naude's prophetic insight during the past twenty years has been vindicated by the decision taken by the World Alliance of Reformed Churches in Ottawa in 1982. We therefore wish to honour him and to dedicate this volume of essays to him and Ilse with respect, admiration and gratitude. In academic circles it is customary to honour a distinguished scholar by publishing a Festschrift on an important occasion in his life. The WARC decision on apartheid provides us with such an opportunity in the case of Beyers Naude". -- Dedication.
"The decision of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches to declare apartheid sinful and the theological and moral justification of it a heresy, and to suspend the NGK and NHK from their privileges of membership of the world body, is now history. Yet, for our South African Churches, it is only a beginning." -- Foreword.
Contents: Dedication -- Abbreviations -- Contributors -- Acknowledgements -- Foreword dated Cape Town, November 1982 / Allan Boesak -- Introduction / The Editors -- He Made Us All, But / Allan Boesak -- The History of a Heresy / Chris Loff -- Nothing But a Heresy / David Bosch -- Christianity and Apartheid / Desmond Tutu -- An Anthropological Heresy / Simon Maimela -- An All-Pervading Heresy / Charles Villa-Vicencio -- Towards a Confessing Church / John de Gruchy -- The Bible and Apartheid 1 / William Vorster -- The Bible and Apartheid 2 / Douglas Bax -- Appendix: Documentation.
Contents of Appendix: Introduction -- 1. Southern African Bishops' Conference, 1957 (Statement on Apartheid) -- 2. Cottesloe Consultation Statement, 1961 -- 3. South African Council of Churches, 1968 (A Message to the People of South Africa) -- 4. Presbyterian Church of Southern Africa, 1973 (Declaration of Faith) -- 5. Lutheran World Federation, 1977 (Southern Africa: Confessional Integrity) -- 6. Alliance of Black Reformed Christians in Southern Africa, 1981 (ABRECSA Charter) -- 7. Alliance of Black Reformed Christians in Southern Africa, 1981 (Black and Reformed) -- 8. United Congregational Church of Southern Africa, 1982 (Resolution on Apartheid) -- 9. World Alliance of Reformed Churches, 1982 (Racism and South Africa) -- 10. Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk, 1982 (Statement on WARC Decision) -- 11. Nederduitse Gereformeerde Sendingkerk, 1982 (A Statement on Apartheid and a Confession of Faith) -- 12. Methodist Church of Southern Africa, 1982 (Resolution on Apartheid) -- 13. Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk, 1982 (Resolution on the WARC Decision) -- 14. Church of the Province of Southern Africa (Anglican), 1982 (Resolution on Apartheid).
Added Entry
De Gruchy, John W., 1939-
Villa-Vicencio, Charles, 1942-
Bax, Douglas S., 1934-
Boesak, Allan (Allan Aubrey), 1946-
Bosch, David J. (David Jacobus), 1929-1992
Loff, Chris (Christiaan John Anthony), 1941-2010
Maimela, Simon (Simon Sekomane), 1944-
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-
Vorster, William
Subjects
Race relations - Religious aspects - Christianity
Church and state - South Africa
South Africa - Race relations
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
South Africa - Politics and government - 1948-1994
ISBN
0-8028-1972-9
Call Number
DT 763 A63 1983
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Bishop Tutu speaks out : excerpts from the Nobel Prizewinner's addresses

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog1483
Author
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-2021
Publication Date
1985
Material Type
Pamphlet
Location
OTCH
Call Number
BX 5800 F67 no. 791
Author
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-2021
Place
Cincinnati OH
Publisher
Forward Movement Publications
Publication Date
1985
Physical_Description
15 p. ; 15.2 x 8.8 cm.
Material Type
Pamphlet
Notes
"[FM] 791". -- back cover.
Cover title.
"Reprinted with permission from 'The Witness Magazine', Volume 67, Number 12, December 1984." -- p. [2].
"Second Printing". -- p. [2].
12 excerpts from addressed delivered between 1977 and 1984.
Contents: United States a 'strange country' -- Violence of apartheid, racism -- SACC not fly by night group -- Taking Bible seriously -- Suggested code for investors -- 'Want our chains removed' -- Convoluted logic, linguistics -- May trigger World War III -- On being a Native -- Jesse Jackson caused stir -- Perceptions in Black and White -- Modern day parable -- Resources.
Series
Forward Movement ; 791
Subjects
Apartheid - South Africa
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
South Africa - Race relations
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Tutu, Desmond M. (Desmond Mpilo), 1931-2021
Call Number
BX 5800 F67 no. 791
Location
OTCH
Less detail

Breaking down the walls : World Council of Churches statements and actions on racism 1948-1985

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog5279
Publication Date
c1986
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BT 734.2 W6B7 1986
Edition
2nd ed.
Place
Geneva
Publisher
Programme to Combat Racism, World Council of Churches
Publication Date
c1986
Physical_Description
107 p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Edited by Ans J. van der Bent".
"Several World Council of Churches' publications need from time to time an updating. This is also the case with this reference work which was published in 1980. Since that time a world consultation on `The Churches' Response to Racism in the 1980s' in The Netherlands in 1980, four Central Committees of the WCC and its Sixth Assembly at Vancouver, Canada in 1983 took place. These gathering dealt with various matters concerning the combat of racism and issued new statements. They are included in this revised edition. Also the bibliography of World Council of Churches' publications and of other recent literature has been brought up-to-date. Several books on black theology have been asked". -- Intro. to the Second Edition.
Contents: Preface / Anwar M. Barkat -- Introduction to the Second Edition -- Introduction -- A Chronological Record of Ecumenical and World Council of Churches' Resolutions, Statements and Actions on Racism, 1937-1985 -- Ecumenical Statements on Racism and the Struggle Against It : Since 1948 -- Selective Recent Literature on Racism for Further Reading.
Series
PCR information ; 1986, special report
Added Entry
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
van der Bent, A.J. (Ans Joachim), 1924-1995
Subjects
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - World Council of Churches
Call Number
BT 734.2 W6B7 1986
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Breaking down the walls : World Council of Churches statements and actions on racism 1948-1985

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog9000
Publication Date
c1986
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Call Number
BT 734.2 W6B7 1986
Edition
2nd ed.
Place
Geneva
Publisher
Programme to Combat Racism, World Council of Churches
Publication Date
c1986
Physical_Description
107 p. ; 21 x 14.7 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
"Edited by Ans J. van der Bent".
"Several World Council of Churches' publications need from time to time an updating. This is also the case with this reference work which was published in 1980. Since that time a world consultation on `The Churches' Response to Racism in the 1980s' in The Netherlands in 1980, four Central Committees of the WCC and its Sixth Assembly at Vancouver, Canada in 1983 took place. These gathering dealt with various matters concerning the combat of racism and issued new statements. They are included in this revised edition. Also the bibliography of World Council of Churches' publications and of other recent literature has been brought up-to-date. Several books on black theology have been asked". -- Intro. to the Second Edition.
Contents: Preface / Anwar M. Barkat, Director -- Introduction to the Second Edition -- Introduction -- A Chronological Record of Ecumenical and World Council of Churches' Resolutions, Statements and Actions on Racism, 1937-1985 -- Ecumenical Statements on Racism and the Struggle Against It: Since 1948 -- Selective Recent Literature on Racism for Further Reading.
Colophon: Printed by Imprimerie Marc Picarat, Geneva.
Series
PCR information ; 1986, special report
Added Entry
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
van der Bent, A.J. (Ans Joachim), 1924-1995
Barkat, Anwar M.
Subjects
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - World Council of Churches
ISBN
2-8254-0866-2
Call Number
BT 734.2 W6B7 1986
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Less detail

Breakthrough : the emergence of the ecumenical tradition

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog8217
Author
Bilheimer, Robert S., 1917-2006
Publication Date
c1989
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 8.2 B44 1989
Author
Bilheimer, Robert S., 1917-2006
Place
Grand Rapids MI
Publisher
Eerdmans
Publication Date
c1989
Physical_Description
x, 235 p. : ill. ; 23 x 15.3 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
"[By] Robert S. Bilheimer".
"Copyright 1989 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. First published 1989 jointly with WCC Publications". -- verso of t.-p.
Includes index
"The ecumenical movement has a memory, and this book has been written to contribute to it. It is not likely that the history of events and institutions which constituted the movement will be forgotten, for they are all well documented. Mine is an account of what the early ecumenical movement believed in, what it stood for, and how it understood the times in which it lived. The story is told in the first person, because I was there, believed in it, and felt called to serve it throughout my ministry. A chief purpose in writing has been to make materials accessible. Many of them are contained in fugitive pamphlets, dull documents, drier minutes of meetings, and not very exciting biographies". -- Preface, p. ix.
Contents: Dedication -- Preface -- [Part] I: Foreunners -- Ferment -- Focus -- [Part] II: The End of Christendom: Ruin and Covenant -- The End of Christendom: Covenant -- The Covenant: Stress and Growth -- Interlude: My Role -- [Part] III: Christ the Lord: Lordship, Unity, and Witness -- The Lordship of Christ over the Church and the World -- Unity: To Search and Proclaim -- Witness -- [Part] IV: A People Amid the Peoples -- Service: From the Rich to the Devastated, with Dignity -- Peace and the World of Nations -- Church, Society, and Rapid Social Change -- The Sexes: Cooperation Between Men and Women -- The Races -- Conclusion -- The Emerging Ecumenical Tradition -- Official Ecumenical Corpus -- Index.
Author is "an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), [who] worked for the World Council of Churches from 1948 to 1963, and for the next ten years he served as executive director of The Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research". -- back cover.
Added Entry
World Council of Churches
Subjects
Christian union - 20th century - History
Ecumenical movement - 20th century - History
World Council of Churches - History - 20th century
World Council of Churches - History - Sources
Bilheimer, Robert S., 1917-2006
Church and the world - 20th century
Church and development - Christianity
Christianity and international affairs - 20th century
World Council of Churches. Commission of the Churches on International Affairs - History
Church and social problems
Man-woman relationships - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
ISBN
0-8028-0296-6 (Eerdmans)
2-8254-0955-3
Call Number
BX 8.2 B44 1989
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Canadian Council of Churches Statement on Anti-Semitism (Appendix F of Report #033-17-03-11) (attached as Appendix "D")

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8411
Date
2003 November 7-9
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-11-03
Date
2003 November 7-9
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-11-03
Mover
Rev. Alan Perry
Seconder
Bishop Ann Tottenham
Text
That the Council of General Synod approve the draft statement of the Canadian Council of Churches on anti-Semitism. CARRIED #20-11-03
Notes
APPENDIX "D"
Draft CCC Statement on anti-Semitism
An open letter from the Canadian Council of Churches, to the Churches of Canada, the Jewish Community in Canada, and to all people of good will.
The Canadian Council of Churches is an Ecumenical forum of twenty denominations including the Anglican, Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman Catholic communions.
In this letter, we are addressing one situation only, which is a Canadian one. While we recognize that there are other serious situations here in Canada and throughout the world which demand the faithful attention of all people of good will, we have become profoundly concerned and deeply dismayed by the alarming increase of antisemitism in Canada. This antisemitism has taken many forms, including violence against Jewish persons -- simply because of their ethnic or religious background, and the desecration of Holy places and cemeteries. We have become alerted to this resurgent evil through our own witness, through the media, and through the testimony of others, including members of the Judiciary of the Court of Appeal of Ontario and the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.
We the representatives of the vast majority of Christian churches in Canada are fully aware of and deeply grateful for the Jewish roots of our faith traditions. In the Epistle to the Romans, Chapter 11, verses 17 and 18, St. Paul wrote,
"You Gentiles are like a branch of a wild olive tree that were made to be a part of a cultivated olive tree ... you enjoy the blessings that come from being part of that cultivated tree ... Just remember that you are not supporting the roots of that tree. Its roots are supporting you." (Contemporary English Version)
Therefore we would declare our unqualified gratitude for the gifts of the Jewish people to world civilization in general and Canadian society in particular.
We acknowledge with sadness and regret, and with no little shame, the historic burden of persecution which Jews have borne throughout western history, a burden all too often inflicted by Christians, who have maligned Jesus' own people in Jesus' name.
We challenge all the churches, parishes, congregations and members of our forum to find ways and means to expose and eradicate antisemitism within and from Canadian society.
We must not be silent.
We urge all Canadians, within our forum community and beyond, to exercise the greatest diligence on behalf of our Jewish friends and neighbours, that when they come under attack, and their sacred places desecrated, that they find true solidarity in establishing security and in redressing wrong.
We invite all our people, where the opportunity exists, to become acquainted with our Jewish brothers and sisters and with their places of worship in communities from coast to coast to coast, celebrating all that we share with our Jewish friends and neighbours, and respecting our differences.
As a Council of Churches, we commit ourselves to demonstrating not only through words but through united action, our determination to confront antisemitism on every front.
This we pledge in the unwavering conviction of the eternal love of Almighty God for all peoples and nations, in the unwavering conviction that we are, Jews and Christians alike, brothers and sisters, children of one God, heirs in faith of Abraham and Sarah.
Subjects
Antisemitism - Canada
Antisemitism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Antisemitism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Canadian Council of Churches
Racism - Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Less detail

Catching both sides of the wind : conversations with five black pastors

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog4859
Author
Jackson, Anita
Publication Date
c1985
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Call Number
HN 390 J32 1985
Author
Jackson, Anita
Place
London
Publisher
British Council of Churches
Publication Date
c1985
Physical_Description
xxi, 141 p. : ports.; 21.4 x 13.5 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
"[By] Anita Jackson".
"Photographs by David Richardson".
The author, after teaching "went into race relations, working first as a conciliation officer at the Race Relations Board and then as an investigative officer for the Commission for Racial Equality. After leaving the CRE, with financial support from the Institute of Community Studies, Bethnal Green, she carried out the work which has led to this book". -- back cover.
Contents: Foreword / Io Smith and Victor Watson, Co-Chairmen of the Conference for Christian Partnership [and] Ivor Smith-Cameron, Moderator of the Community and Race Relations Unit of the British Council of Churches -- Introduction -- Pastor Ira Brooks : Pentecostalist -- The Reverend Robinson Milwood : Methodist -- Father Ronald Farley : Anglican -- Pastor Hugo Kennedy : Seventh-Day Adventist -- Mrs. Vera Edwards : Roman Catholic -- The Churches -- Some Background Notes -- Basic Plan of Interviews.
Colophon: Printed by W. Hutson Print Ltd., Warrington, Cheshire.
Added Entry
British Council of Churches
Subjects
Church and social problems - Great Britain
West Indians - Great Britain
Great Britain - Social conditions - 1945-
Black clergy - Great Britain
Racism - Great Britain
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Black Anglicans - Church of England
Farley, Ronald Alexander, 1930-
Brooks, Ira
Milwood, Robinson
Kennedy, Hugo
Edwards, Vera
ISBN
0-85169-101-3
Call Number
HN 390 J32 1985
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Less detail

Challenge to the church : a theological comment on the political crisis in South Africa : Kairos document

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog3967
Publication Date
[1985]
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BT 30 S6 K34 1985
Corporate Author
Kairos Theologians (Group)
Place
[Bramfontein, South Africa]
Publisher
[Published by The Kairos Theologians, Printed by Springs Advertiser (Pty), Springs]
Publication Date
[1985]
Physical_Description
ii, 26 [+2] p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Cover title.
"The KAIROS document is a Christian, biblical and theological comment on the political crisis in South Africa today. It is an attempt by concerned Christians in south Africa to reflect on the situation of death in our country. It is a critique of the current theological models that determine the type of activities the Church engages in to try to resolve the problems of the country. It is an attempt to develop, out of this perplexing situation, an alternative biblical and theological model that will in turn lead to forms of activity that will make a real difference to the future of our country". -- Preface, p. i.
Contents: Preface -- The Moment of Truth -- Critique of "State Theology" -- Critique of "Church Theology" -- Towards a Prophetic Theology -- Challenge to Action -- Conclusion.
Last three pages are list of 111 names, signatories to document, with name and church affiliation.
Added Entry
Kairos document
Subjects
Theology, Doctrinal - South Africa - History - 20th century
Christianity and politics - South Africa
Church and state - South Africa
Race (Theology)
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
South Africa - Race relations - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
Liberation theology - Africa
Call Number
BT 30 S6 K34 1985
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Challenge to the church : a theological comment on the political crisis in South Africa : Kairos document

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog8117
Publication Date
[1985]
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
St Paul's-Ottawa
Call Number
BT 30 S6 K34 1985
Corporate Author
Kairos Theologians (Group)
Place
[Bramfontein, South Africa]
Publisher
[Published by The Kairos Theologians, Printed by Springs Advertiser (Pty), Springs]
Publication Date
[1985]
Physical_Description
ii, 26 [+2] p. ; 21.7 x 14.1 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
Cover title.
"The KAIROS document is a Christian, biblical and theological comment on the political crisis in South Africa today. It is an attempt by concerned Christians in south Africa to reflect on the situation of death in our country. It is a critique of the current theological models that determine the type of activities the Church engages in to try to resolve the problems of the country. It is an attempt to develop, out of this perplexing situation, an alternative biblical and theological model that will in turn lead to forms of activity that will make a real difference to the future of our country". -- Preface, p. i.
Contents: Preface -- The Moment of Truth -- Critique of "State Theology" -- Critique of "Church Theology" -- Towards a Prophetic Theology -- Challenge to Action -- Conclusion.
Last three pages are list of 111 names, signatories to document, with name and church affiliation. Includes many Anglicans.
Added Entry
Kairos document
Subjects
Theology, Doctrinal - South Africa - History - 20th century
Christianity and politics - South Africa
Church and state - South Africa
Race (Theology)
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
South Africa - Race relations - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
Liberation theology - Africa
Call Number
BT 30 S6 K34 1985
Location
St Paul's-Ottawa
Less detail

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