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Across Canada: Canada

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article16895
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 November
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 November
Volume
120
Issue
9
Page
2
Notes
The Montreal diocesan committee on race relations has organized an ecumenical day for the family on 12 November 1994 to celebrate the International Year of the Family. Dr Cassandra Jackson of the United States Episcopal Church will give the theme address on "Racism: a challenge for the family." [entire article]
Subjects
International Year of the Family (1994)
Family - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Montreal
Less detail

Additional Partners

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9088
Date
2005 May 6 - 8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 23-05-05
Date
2005 May 6 - 8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 23-05-05
Mover
Dean Peter Wall
Seconder
Rev. Nigel Packwood
Text
That this Council of General Synod ask the Planning and Agenda Team to consider inviting several additional partners from visible minorities to attend Council meetings, contingent on funding being secured to enable this, and to report back to Council in November 2005. CARRIED #23-05-05
Subjects
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Anti-Racism Working Group - Membership
Less detail

Alien Immigration

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article451
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 August
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 August
Issue
3
Page
1-15 p.
Notes
"The subject of immigration into Canada is a very difficult one; not simple, but extremely complex. It involves not only the problem of assimilating large numbers of aliens who do not speak English, and whose ways, ideals and outlook on life are radically, and in the case of the older ones at least, ineradicably different from our own, but also it involves another great problem, the effect of this influx of cheap, unskilled labour in to the industrial markets, and that is, perhaps, an even more difficult question that the other. Happily we have the experience of the United States to learn from. .... With the general, political and economic subject of immigration, in so far as it does not involve any moral or religious question, the Council for Social Services and the Church of England in Canada are not concerned; with certain aspects of it they are deeply interested, and it is with these that the present Bulletin deals, namely with Asiatic immigration (p. 3)."
Contents divided into sub-sections: The Limitation of Immigration -- East Indian Immigration into Canada -- The Question of Cheap Labour -- Report of the Sub-Committee -- Chinese Immigration -- Admittance of East Indians -- The Controversy Over East Indian Immigration -- Alleged Exclusion of Wives and Children -- South Africa -- Summary -- Bibliography.
Colophon: Hanson, Crozier & Edgar, Printers, Kingston, Ont.
Subjects
Canada - Emigration and immigration - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Emigration and immigration - Government policy
Church work with immigrants - Anglican Church of Canada
East Indians - Canada
Chinese - Canada
Racism - Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

[Anglican Church of Canada Support of World Council of Churches]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3154
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immediate release -- October 12, 1977
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" or "liberation movements" by still others.
In an effort to clarify the situation a lengthy position paper has been prepared by the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and some of its staff members. We enclose the full text of the paper for your information and hope you will keep it on file should there be further interest on the part of your readers or audience.
We would point out several highlights of the paper. Much misunderstanding has been created because the Anglican Church of Canada supports the World Council of Churches which, in turn, makes grants to groups such as the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO). The paper points out that any such grants do not come from General WCC funds or even from the General Relief and Development Fund.
There is, in the WCC, a special Program to Combat Racism, which has a separate fund, maintained by special contributions from individuals, groups and churches given specifically for this purpose from which grants are made. No grant is given until strict criteria are met. These criteria are meant to insure that the grants are used for humanitarian purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided releases other funds for military purposes. Since the WCC knows what much of the money is used for - support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies - they are confident that it is being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purposes, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
In its first six years, the fund for the Programme to Combat Racism received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to groups on every continent. Roughly one-half of this went to Africa. There is one interesting facet of this for concerned Canadian Anglicans. The Anglican Church of Canada has contributed $10,000 annually to this Programme. Between 1970 and 1976, the Programme to Combat Racism has made amongst its grants, these:
The Inuit (Eskimo) Tapirisat of Canada - 1971 - $2,500.00
The National Indian Brotherhood (on behalf of the Cree) - 1973-4 - $12,500.00
The Indian Brotherhood of the N.W.T. - 1973 - $7,500.00
The Committee for Original Peoples Entitlement - 1976 - $10,000.00
For further information, please contact:
Richard J. Berryman
Media Consultant
The Anglican Church of Canada
600 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192 ext. 253
Notes
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA POSITION PAPER ON THE WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES PROGRAM TO COMBAT RACISM
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches, was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" by others and "liberation movements" by others. These groups are all involved in a struggle against "racism."
The Churches because they believe that "God has created of one blood all nations of people," and because they believe human beings are made in the image of God, and are therefore of value and worth have, particularly in the last quarter century pressed for the recognition of the need for conversations between the aggrieved majorities of Southern Africa and their minority governments. This separation has in many instances, particularly in the cases of South Africa and Rhodesia, existed in extreme form because racism has been structured into law. The clear preference of the Churches and the vast majority of those involved in a search for a change has been to seek non-violent change. But within the broadly based groups seeking change there have been and are some elements which have come to believe that the necessary changes will not come about by non-violent means, and also some individuals and groups who under extreme provocation in particular instances have resorted to violence. Such groups and actions are also to be discovered in the historical development of Britain, Canada and the U.S.A. -- in fact of virtually every country in the world.
In Africa some black groups have resorted to war always against huge odds, only when other methods of achieving change have been exhausted -- when they have seen other methods have been increasingly restricted by such actions as banning of distribution of literature, of the right to meet together, and to organize, and now more and more they are suffering personal detention and harassment. The most recent example of this is the case of Steve Biko, a prominent young leader devoted to non-violence whose death occurred during imprisonment.
Stories of brutality by liberation movements have been publicized but these can be matched and perhaps exceeded by stories of brutality involving violent oppression, torture, and death on the part of ruling governments over many years. But trading of atrocity stories accomplishes very little, if anything. Three things need to be recognized.
1. Violence does exist.
2. Violence of itself cannot create a better or more just world, and all too often violence leaders to counter violence in an ascending scale.
3. Today it is recognized that very often there is a high level of violence in many institutionalized structures, particularly in Africa.
But violence has been and is a part of history and there have been times when violence has destroyed a repressive situation and provided an opportunity to develop something new in its place. There have also been times when violence has been used to destroy hopeful conditions and to bring about oppression and exploitation. The place of violence and non-violence in social change is a complex one and one which the World Council of Churches has been studying carefully and, I believe, responsibly (see attached document).
Even as this study has been progressing, the World Council, because of the Christian call to stand on the side of the oppressed and to work for liberation, which was the ter[m] in which Jesus described his ministry:
"And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he opened the book he found the place where it was written, The Spirit of the Lord in [i.e. is] upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord. And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears." (Luke 4:17-21)
The World Council has sought to take positive action to identify with those who are struggling against racism in many parts of the world through a special program designed to combat racism. This program has three sections.
1. An administrative section with three staff members which initiates studies.
2. A program section with projects undertaken by church groups designed to combat racism as it is found in particular forms and places.
3. Grants made from a special fund which was formed by an initial grant from the WCC and maintained since then by special contributions made by individuals, groups and Churches who give money directly to this fund for its stated purposes. In its first six years the fund received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to organizations and groups in various parts of the world, part of whose program is designed to combat racism. Grants to such groups have been made on every continent. They are applied for, but are not given until the organizations agree to use the grants according to strict criteria as follows:
-1. The purpose of the organizations must not be inconsonant with the general purposes of the WCC and its units, and the grants are to be used for humanitarian activities (i.e. social, health and educational purposes, legal aid, etc.).
-2. The proceeds of the Fund shall be used to support organizations that combat racism, rather than welfare organizations that alleviate the effects of racism and which would normally be eligible for support from other units of the World Council of Churches.
-3. (a) The focus of grants should be on raising the level of awareness and strengthening the organizational capability of the racially oppressed people.
- (b) In addition, we recognize the need to support organizations that align themselves with the victims of racial injustice and pursue the same objectives.
4. The grants are intended as an expression of commitment by the PCR to the cause of economic, social and political justice, which these organizations promote.
5.(a) The situation in Southern Africa is recognized as a priority due to the overt and intensive nature of white racism and the increasing awareness on the part of the oppressed in their struggle for liberation.
- (b) In the selection of other areas we have taken account of those places where the struggle is most intense and where a grant might make a substantial contribution to the process of liberation, particularly where racial groups are in imminent danger of being physically or culturally exterminated.
- (c) In considering applications from organizations in countries of white and affluent majorities, we have taken not only of those where political involvement precludes help from other sources.
6. Grants should be made with due regard to where they can have the maximum effect: token grants should not be made unless there is a possibility of their eliciting a substantial response from other organizations.
The geographic area where the grants have led to much discussion is Africa. Southern Africa has received approximately one half of the grants made thus far. Here there has been no case where it was ever proven that the grants were used for military purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided released other funds for military purposes. Since we know what much of the money is used for -- support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies -- we are confident that they are being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purpose, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
Three things are clearly evident. One, a hopeful one, is that many people are concerned about the growing use of violence and of how the Churches should be responding to it. As long as violence exists, Churches and Church people must grapple with this reality and try to sort out how to respond to this reality with Christian insights. Christians do not share a common mind about this. The position Christians take is often greatly influenced by the context or conditions under which they live and by the alternative courses of action which are open or closed to them. As understanding of this fact grows the polarization within the Churches becomes less.
Second, certain groups seem clearly involved in opposing the program to combat racism and to focus attention upon it as a way to keep general attention away from some of the underlying causal conditions which lead to violence.
Third, to set violence and non-violence as they relate to social change, as the only two positions and in complete opposition is to ignore reality. They are better viewed as the two extremes of an arc in which there are a wide variety of shades of opinion and of action. The following Social Involvement Rating Scale helps to identify some of the modes of action open to individuals and groups within society and the Church. Studied carefully, it helps us gain a deeper understanding of a complex issue and also to identify where we stand and why.
SOCIAL INVOLVEMENT RATING SCALE
1. 'Non-involvement': Conscious avoidance of any involvement in social and political activities.
2. 'Reactive involvement': Involvement in social and political activities occurs mainly when the church is in an established position but when institutional power is threatened or influence is eroded due to social change processes. Involvement can either by [i.e. be] directly or indirectly political.
3. 'Active Personal Involvement': Involvement is positive (not reactive), but limited to personal issues not seen as related to the social structure. Action is 'non political' and is concerned with individual development and improvement of personal welfare services.
4. 'Active Social Involvement' (concensus) [i.e. consensus]: Involvement is positive, but extending beyond personal issues seeking incremental, gradual change in the social structure and attitudes by educational methods using democratic processes.
5. 'Active Involvement in Structural Change' (conflict): Involvement is characterised by greater political activism using confronting techniques to achieve incremental but more rapid evolutionary changes in social structure.
6. 'Indirect Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using non-violent techniques aimed at the peaceful overthrow of existing political and social structures.
7. 'Direct Active Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using techniques aimed at the violent overthrow of existing oppressive political and social structures.
[Graphic showing an arc graph with labels from left to right] Non-involvement, Reactive Involvement, Active Personal Involvement, Active Social Involvement (consensus), Active Involvement in structural change (conflict), Indirect Involvement in revolution, Direct Active Involvement in revolution - Adapted from a scale developed by the Reverend Peter J. Hollingsworth, Melbourne, Australia.
Subjects
Carr, Burgess A. (Burgess Alpha), 1935-2012
All Africa Conference of Churches
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism. Special Fund
Racism - Africa
Racism - Canada
Racism - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - South Africa
Violence - Africa
Violence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Christianity and politics
Less detail

Anglicans in public life: The complex journey of Mayann Francis

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39988
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 January
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 January
Volume
140
Issue
1
Page
11
Notes
Mayann Elizabeth Francis "was the 31st lieutenant governor of her province -- and the second black person in Canada and the first black person in Nova Scotia to hold the vice-regal office". Francis was raised in Sydney's working-class Whitney Pier neighbourhood. She is a "devout Anglican and eucharistic minister at All Saints' Anglican Cathedral in Halifax". As Lieutenant Governor "in 2010 Francis invoked royal prerogative and granted Canada's first posthumous pardon to Viola Desmond, a black Nova Scotian who, in 1946, insisted on sitting in the whites-only section of a New Glasgow movie theatre. Desmond was arrested and ludicrously charged with ticket-related tax fraud, a battle she lost in court". "Of the current state of racism in Canada, Francis says" 'While I believe racial discrimination still exists here and elsewhere, we can learn from the mistakes of the past and celebrate the gains we have made. At the same time, we must acknowledge and understand that there is still work to be done'. For Francis, being a trailblazer requires help. 'I always rely on my faith, prayer and Christian teachings', she says. 'You have to have something to give your that strength and that courage and that energy to keep moving'. Prayer is the fuel that keeps her going".
Subjects
Francis, Mayann (Mayann Elizabeth), 1946-
Lieutenant-Governors - Nova Scotia
Desmond, Viola (Viola Irene), 1914- 1965
Racism - Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglicans join anti-hate pledge: Hiltz calls for prayers following Barcelona, Charlottesville attacks

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41279
Author
Forget, Andre
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 October
Author
Forget, Andre
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 October
Volume
143
Issue
8
Page
8
Notes
"Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has asked the faithful to pray for those affected by the deadly attacks in Charlottesville, Va., and Barcelona, and to work for a more peaceful world. In a related development, the Anglican Church of Canada joined more that 50 organizations -- some religious, some secular -- in a joint statement against hate". "In a statement August 18 [2017], Hiltz said the violence in Charlottesville and activities being planned by white supremacy movements 'have been a painful reminder that racialized violence is a sad reality of our time, not only in the United States, but in our own country too'." "Reacting to the van attack August 17 [2017] along the Las Ramblas Boulevard, in Barcelona, Hiltz asked Anglicans to pray both for 'all those traumatized by this atrocity' and for 'those who with such malicious intent inflict such horrific suffering on others'. At least 14 people were killed and more than 120 injured in the attack, which Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy blamed on 'jihadists'."
Subjects
Violence - United States
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - United States - 21st century
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Spain
Terrorism - Spain
Terrorism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Less detail
Date
2001 July 4-11
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 56
Date
2001 July 4-11
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 56
Mover
Bishop James Cruickshank
Seconder
Rev. Larry Beardy
Text
That this General Synod:
1. Affirm the significance of the World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance in Durban South Africa, August/September 2001, marking the third decade of UN work on racism, as a moment to re-commit ourselves to the elimination of racism.
2. Request the General Secretary to convene an anti-racism training session at the joint meeting of the Standing Committees/Councils/Boards planned for the spring of 2002 (or at another appropriate venue), as a way to develop a common lens for analyzing racism and strategizing for positive change.
3. Request its Standing Committees/Councils/Boards to implement at least one concrete strategy toward the elimination of racism in both church and society as it relates to their mission and mandate, and to report these strategies to the Council of General Synod;
4. Request the EcoJustice Committee to consult with Standing Committees/Councils/Boards and to appoint an appropriately representative Working Group to make recommendations to the Council of General Synod regarding strategies for carrying forward the Anglican Church's work on anti-racism. CARRIED WITHOUT DEBATE Act 56
Subjects
Racism
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (2001 : Durban, South Africa)
Less detail

Anti-racism charter is in the works

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31372
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2004 June - July
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2004 June - July
Volume
130
Issue
6
Page
16
Notes
A working group of the Council of General Synod presented to General Synod a proposed "Charter for Racial Justice Policies" for the church. It is still being revised.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (37th : 2004 : St. Catharines, Ont.)
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Still, Murray
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of General Synod
Charter for Racial Justice in the Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

ANTI RACISM IMPLEMENTATION GROUP #028-03-09-05

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9596
Date
2009 May 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-05-09
Date
2009 May 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-05-09
Prologue
The report contained a proposed resolution:
That this Council of General Synod:
- 1. Commits to have the employees and volunteers of General Synod sign on to the Charter for Racial Justice in the Anglican Church of Canada, adopted by the Council of General Synod in March 2007;
- 2. Directs the Anti-Racism Working Group and the office of the General Secretary to design a protocol for staff and volunteers of General Synod to commit to accepting and adhering to the Charter; and
- 3. Requests the Planning and Agenda team to schedule: a) a three hour session for anti-racism awareness training for the members of the Council of General Synod at its next meeting in the 2007-2010 triennium; b) six to eight hours for anti-racism training for the members of the Council of General Synod, during the first and/or second meeting of the 2010-2013 triennium.
- 4. Requests the General Secretary to ensure that anti-racism training is provided to the staff of General Synod by the end of 2010, using external, trained facilitators from the Anglican or United Church of Canada.
It was proposed:
Text
That this resolution be tabled until the November 2009 meeting. ADOPTED BY CONSENSUS #16-05-09
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anti-Racism Implementation Group
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anti-Racism Training Funding Proposal

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9086
Date
2005 May 6 - 8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 21-05-05
Date
2005 May 6 - 8
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 21-05-05
Mover
Dean Peter Wall
Seconder
Bishop Susan Moxley
Text
That this Council of General Synod approve in principle the funding proposal to enable Anti-Racism Training in the 2004-2007 triennium for the Council of General Synod, its Standing Committees, ACIP, and the Board of PWRDF. CARRIED #21-05-05
Notes
The funding proposal is detailed in report #028-01-05-05.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anti-Racism Working Group
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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107 records – page 1 of 11.