Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Anglican Bishops to have "Inside" Look at Corrections System

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1449
Date
1986 October 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1986 October 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Oct. 07, 1986 -- For immediate release
"What's a nice Bishop like you doing in a place like the Penitentiary?", may well be asked next month.
The members of the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada have a difficult task as chief Pastors in the face of the complexities of the moral issues of today's society. To assist them in this, the House meets periodically with experts in various fields, in what are known as Continuing Education events, to receive insight into the realities of many of the issues which confront the Church and society.
Two such areas of concern which have been the subjects of Continuing Education sessions of the House in the past were Bio-Medical Ethics and Human Sexuality.
In the first week of November the House will meet in Kingston, Ontario to consider the effects of the Canadian Corrections Service on its inmates, those who work in it and the society it is created to protect. A most impressive schedule of events and presentations has been planned to give the Bishops a personal in-depth experience of various aspects of the criminal justice and corrections system. A schedule of the three day session is enclosed.
The House reserves the right to declare any of its sessions in-camera. However, the Agenda and Continuing Education Committees of the House have suggested that all of these sessions should be open to the Media, subject to the concurrence of the House when it meets.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
The Rev. Canon Richard J. Berryman, Media Officer
Notes
HOUSE OF BISHOPS CONTINUING EDUCATION EVENT ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND CORRECTIONS
To be held at the Howard Johnson Motor Hotel, Kingston, Ont.
Tuesday, Nov. 04, 1986:
- 7:30 p.m. Reception to give the Bishops an opportunity to meet about 100 people from the John Howard Society, parole officers, prison guards, legal and judicial professions.
Wednesday, Nov. 05, 1986:
- 10:00 a.m. Presentation by Alex Himmelfard, Director of Research, Federal Justice Department, Ottawa -- An overview of the Justice System with special reference to Native People.
- 1:30 p.m. Simulated Court Case -- Trial on a Domestic Violence Case. Actual Proscuting Attorney, Defense Lawyers, etc.
-- Bishops will act as Judge -- decide guilt or innocence and sentence.
-- At conclusion a Judge will declare what his verdict would have been in the trial.
- 4:00 p.m. Theological Reflection on the day to that point.
- Evening The Bishops, in twos and threes, will visit the homes of families of prison guards, inmates, low income family housing, etc.
Thursday, Nov. o6, 1986:
- Morning -- The Bishops will visit six institutions in the Kingston area -- eg. Minimum, Medium and Maximum security facilities, Women's and Juvenile Detention Centres, etc.
- 1:30 p.m. Consideration (with panel of professionals) of Parole, Mandatory Release, etc. "How do inmates get out and what happens when they do ?"
- 7:30 p.m. Eucharist of Reconciliation in St. George's Cathedral.
-- Preacher: The Most Rev. Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
In camera meetings
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - House of Bishops - Education (Continuing education)
Less detail

[Brief on Imprisonment From Anglican Church Social Service Department]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5348
Date
1967 August 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1967 August 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Greater use of parole and the erasing of past criminal records after a specified period of successful rehabilitation are recommended in a brief prepared by the Anglican Church of Canada to the federal government's Canadian Committee on Corrections.
It states that imprisonment is being used excessively and inappropriate use is being made of existing prisons in relation to the philosophy of respect for the dignity and worth of all men and women.
A primary problem in that prison industries do not provide useful work for pay and are not related to the kind of work obtainable in society, it states.
The brief, submitted by the church's social service department, was prepared by men and women from Ottawa, Kingston, Toronto, London and Winnipeg. It will be reported to the church's national synod which meets in Ottawa, August 22-31.
Present practices of arrest, jail and bail discriminate against the poor, the brief states. Release from custody pending trial should be based on character rather than financial considerations. It says professional bondsmen should not be recognized in Canada. It suggests some social problems such as chronic petty offences, vagrancy, suicide, alcoholism and drug addiction be removed from the criminal code and dealt with by appropriate health and welfare authorities.
Provision for legal counsel for those unable to pay for it should be the responsibility of the public purse, the brief states. It recommends again the abolition of the lash and paddle and capital punishment.
The Anglican Church also passed a resolution in support of the abolition of capital punishment in 1958. Two years ago it published a booklet "The Death Penalty," an argument in favor of abolition, which was mailed to members of parliament before the free vote in the House of Commons.
"The entire correctional process should be governed by the Judaeo-Christian philosophy of unfailing respect for the dignity and worth of each human being, of concern for those who have offended and of constant hope for change and moral and spiritual growth in man. The embodiment of such a philosophy in a program of action requires flexibility in the system and provision for continuing evaluation," the committee said.
Freedom, encouragement and resources should be provided both prison staff and those outside the system to undertake research and experimentation, the report recommends.
- 30 -
Subjects
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

The Church and Penal Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article549
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Issue
125
Page
1-8 p.
Notes
"Some Church people, and others, are not aware of the interest which the Church has taken in the general agitation for penal reform in Canada.. Since the inception of the Department of Christian Social Service of our General Synod, in 1917, we have steadily pressed for constructive reforms in the administration of justice, of punishment and rehabilitation, on Federal, Provincial and Municipal levels. .... In February, 1937, this Council presented a Brief to the Royal Commission then investigating the whole matter. .... The Brief is still up to date as few of the Recommendation of the Royal Commission have been implemented. What is needed, therefore, is public agitation to urge and to enable Government to proceed with reform. .... First, some co-ordination of the Federal and the various Provincial systems and institutions, looking to the establishment of Borstal Institutions and a Borstal `system'. The latter is necessary if the institutions are to function properly. We must be clear about this. The name `Borstal' ought to signify to the public not only a certain type of institution (in itself far different and far removed from the present Federal Penitentiaries and/or Provincial Reformatories) but also a whole new system -- one which would deal with offenders, or delinquents, from the moment they come into conflict with law until they are `rehabilitated'. Most, probably, of such persons should never seen the inside of institutions such as we have today. .... Second, the Canadian people may have to spend something more in order to accomplish the desired end. Our people will have to be willing to pay the initial price. In the end, however, we shall save -- in actual hard cash; much more in salvaged human beings and in the prevention of crime and the avoidance of degradation. Are we willing to meet these requirements ? The two documents below, the Council's brief to the Royal Commission, and a statement prepared by a committee of Toronto Diocese and presented to their Synod last year (1945), are published here in order to give our people, as citizens, and in their various Church Synods and subsidiary bodies, a lead. The Toronto Diocesan document is typical (though a bit fuller) of similar statements issued from time to time by other Synods or Church groups." -- [Foreword].
Contents: [Foreword] / W.W. Judd -- Penal Reform : Report to the Toronto Diocesan Synod by a special Committee of the Diocesan Council for Social Service, 1945 -- Brief presented to The Royal Commission on Penal Reform, February, 1937 from The Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada / Most Rev. Derwyn T. Owen, Primate, Chairman [and] Rev. W.W. Judd, General Secretary -- Part 2, Additional Notes : General Church Action -- Pertinent Books In The Council's Library.
The document entitled "Penal Reform" was signed by the three members of the special committee i.e. E.J. Tucker, F.J. Nicholson and John Frank. "Editorial Note: This Report was only received by Toronto synod, not adopted, and commended for study and consideration by Church people and the public generally. It was not regarded a an official statement of the Synod".
Brief divided into five sections: Introductory -- Psychiatry and Custodial Observation -- Segregation and Probation -- Personnel -- Re-habilitation.
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisoners - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Royal Commission to Investigate the Penal System of Canada
Prison reform - Canada
Borstal system
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Council for Social Service - Penal Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5904
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Archbishop of Ottawa
Seconder
Magistrate Jones
Prologue
In 1933 various articles appeared in the daily papers asking for an investigation of conditions in the penitentiaries and citing various abuses. The matter was taken up by the late General Secretary, who carried on correspondence with the various chaplains, with the Prisoners' Aid and Welfare Association in Montreal and interviewed personally several discharged prisoners in an endeavour to get some information on the subject. The late Canon Vernon headed a delegation from the Social Service Council of Canada to wait on the Premier and the Minister of Justice with recommendations on penal reform. He obtained permission from the Minister of Justice to visit the various penitentiaries in the autumn of 1933. At the last annual meeting of the Council for Social Service the following resolutions were passed:
1. There ought to be a thorough investigation and study by an independent and representative commission of all our penal and reformatory institutions, whether dominion, provincial or local, and of the entire system of dealing with delinquents and criminals.
2. Careful consideration should be given to the findings of the Royal Commission of 1914, and of the committee of 1921.
3. That the English Adult Probation System, and the so-called Borstal System, should be carefully considered with a view to their adoption in Canada.
4. And that copies of the foregoing recommendations be sent to the Premier of the Dominion, and the Minister of Justice, to the Premier and attorney-generals of the various provinces, to the Social Service Council of Canada, and to the Canadian Prisoners' Welfare Association.
We understand that conditions have improved very much in the last year, and various reforms have been instituted. The restrictions that formerly hampered the chaplains in the discharge of their duties have been lessened, and it is felt that in future a greater effort will be made to help the men to get such training and education, both mental and spiritual, while they are in the penitentiary, that will enable them to re-establish themselves when they are released.
Text
That in the tenth and following lines all the words following "1933" down to and including "Welfare Association" be not printed in the published Report. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Juvenile justice, Administration of - Canada
Juvenile detention homes - Canada
Less detail

International Anglican Family Network : Prison and families

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article27962
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2000 Michaelmas
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2000 Michaelmas
Issue
99
Page
[21-31] insert
Notes
Michaelmas 2000 issue of IAFN Newsletter included as insert to Anglican World for Michaelmas 2000. A series of short reports on the subject of the families of prisoners. "This newsletter seeks to give visibility to these forgotten victims and to encourage the Anglican Church and other Christians to further develop ministries to prisoners and their families. Partners and children, parents and relatives, are often stigmatized and placed in situations of great hardship through no fault of their own. They should not be forgotten."
Subjects
International Anglican Family Network (IAFN)
Prisoners' families - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Communion
Simon of Cyrene Society
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Prisons - South Africa
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Nigeria
Prisons - Nigeria
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of the Congo
Prisons - Zambia
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Kenya
Prisons - Kenya
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Central Africa
Prisons - Malawi
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of West Africa
Prisons - Ghana
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Uganda
Prisons - Uganda
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Prisons - Israel
Haitians - Dominican Republic
Prisons - Dominican Republic
Prisons - Hong Kong (China)
Prisons - Australia
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Australia
Prisons - India
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of South India
Prisons - Uruguay
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of the Southern Cone of America
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Restorative justice
Prisons - United States
Prisons - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Prisons - Northern Ireland
Prisons - Religious aspects - Church of Ireland
Less detail

Jails and Jail Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article517
Author
Young, John Vernon, 1886-1970
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1925 January
Author
Young, John Vernon, 1886-1970
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1925 January
Issue
71
Page
1-20 p.
Notes
"The purpose of the Bulletin is to present to its readers various, and sometimes differing view points on Social Subjects. Its object is, therefore, information and not propaganda. The Editorial Board does not necessarily endorse all, or any, of the opinions expressed in its publications". -- p. 2.
"`In prison, and ye visited me not.' St. Matt. 25:43. In spite of these words of our blessed Lord, there is still a great deal of indifference towards prisons and the welfare and reformation of prisoners. May I say at the outset, that this paper is dealing with County and Municipal Jails, leaving out the Dominion Penitentiaries of which there are six, and which have to be studied from a different angle, inasmuch as they hold the long sentence men and, therefore, the more serious type of criminal. .... While many people have held the retaliatory or the deterrent theory of punishment, a few, whose numbers are now rapidly increasing, have believed that the proper end and aim of all punishment should be the reformation of the criminal". -- p. 2.
Contents divided into sections: The Work of John Howard -- Jails Today in the United States -- What About Our Canadian Jails ? -- Conditions in Canadian Jails -- Information from Jail Chaplains -- What is Needed to Improve Our Canadian Jails ? -- The Classification of Prisoners -- The Church's Work Among Prisoners.
Author is described as "Chairman of the Council for Social Service of the Diocese of Fredericton".
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisoners - Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Justice and Corrections

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1146
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 37
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 37
Mover
The Rt. Rev. L.F. Hatfield
Seconder
The Rt. Rev. E.K. Clarke
Prologue
The Rt. Rev. L.F. Hatfield spoke to the document "The Opening of the Prison, a Reflection on the Church and the Offender".
Bishop Hatfield introduced the Hon. Mr. Justice A. Lamer, who addressed Synod on the subject of the "Protection of Life Project". On behalf of the Law Reform Commission Mr. Justice Lamer thanked the Church for its cooperation in the area of law reform in Canada.
Chancellor R.H. Soward thanked Mr. Justice Lamer on behalf of Synod for his Address.
Bishop Hatfield presented the Primate with a ceramic chalice created by an inmate of a federal penitentiary and given by the Church Council on Justice and Corrections to the Anglican Church of Canada. The chalice was accompanied by a message which reads
"This gift, the work of federal penitentiary inmates, is presented on behalf of all prisoners by the Church Council on Justice and Corrections. May it serve as a symbol of our common fellowship in Christ with all who acknowledge Him. Especially, may it remind us of our oneness with those from whom we are divided by human judgment, but with whom we stand together under the judgment and by the Grace of Christ, our Lord."
Text
That an ecumenical approach in seeking to apply theological insights to the whole criminal justice system in Canada be endorsed, and in cooperation with other churches, adequate support for the work of the Church Council on Justice and Corrections be provided. Further, the General Synod urges the Church Council on Justice and Corrections to continue its research and educational function so as to enable the churches to discharge their prophetic role in the community by commending Christian principles as guidelines for necessary changes in the criminal justice system. CARRIED ACT 37
Subjects
Church Council on Justice and Corrections (Canada)
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Interdenominational cooperation - Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Justice and Corrections

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1234
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 39
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 39
Mover
The Rt. Rev. L.F. Hatfield
Seconder
The Rt. Rev. E.K. Clarke
Text
That Synod calls upon our Church members to become informed and concerned about present correctional policies and programs and possible alternatives; to provide encouragement and support for all those who are seeking to give expression to their Christian convictions as they work within the criminal justice system; and where appropriate to seek training for involvement as volunteers in preventive and rehabilitative programs. CARRIED ACT 39
Subjects
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Letter to the editor: Printed solace

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41032
Author
Name and city withheld by request
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 April
Author
Name and city withheld by request
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 April
Volume
140
Issue
4
Page
5
Notes
"I read with great interest the thankful letter from the chaplain at Warkworth Institution, Ont., in the Feb. 'Anglican Journal' ['With thanks, p. 4], to which I am now a 'subscriber'. I can appreciate his position in that I was an avid reader of the Journal during my recent times at Pittsburgh Institution, Ont. I know a number of other 'guys' who waited patiently for the new issue to arrive". "God got me through my time in prison -- my first (and only) time -- as I found my way back to Him during those very difficult times. Thank you".
Subjects
Anglican Journal
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisoners - Canada - Religious life
Less detail
Date
1983 March
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1983 March
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rt. Rev. R. Hollis
Seconder
Canon K.L. Genge
Text
That in light of conditions in our penal institutions revealed by such reports as that by the Moderator of the United Church of the Archambault riot, this National Executive Council commends the studies being undertaken on the correctional system by the Program Committee and the House of Bishops. CARRIED
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Correctional institutions - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.