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Affirmation of Resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council Relating to Conflict in the Middle East

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8283
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
Affirm the following resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council relating to conflict in the Middle East, numbered F1, F2, and F3 below:
F.1. Israel/Palestine.
This Anglican Consultative Council notes with increasing concern the continuing instability and violence in Israel/Palestine and the resulting economic and social disadvantage in vulnerable groups and communities, as well as the widespread destruction, fear, injury and loss of life in the area;
a) believes that the best way to achieve longer-term security and a lasting basis for peace is for each side to recognize the legitimate aspirations, rights and needs of the other;
b) condemns all violence against civilians;
c) while recognising the legitimate right to its own defence, believes that the present conduct of the State of Israel has raised the level of threat to Palestinians and thus escalated the violence, with its consequent threat to the security of all families and individuals within the State of Israel;
d) calls upon the Israeli Government and the Palestinian Authority, as well as individual politicians, religious groups and community leaders, to find a way of breaking the spiral of revenge violence by entering into a new joint formal process of negotiation, based on international, religious and humane values of truth, forgiveness and reconciliation, in order to move towards genuine peace, justice and stability in the area;
e) calls upon the Israeli Government to implement UN resolutions 242, 338 and 194; and supports resolution V.20 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference;
f) urges the member churches of the Anglican Communion and associated agencies to find new ways of supporting collaborative projects between Israeli and Palestinian, Jewish, Muslim and Christian individuals and groups;
g) assures the people of Israel/Palestine of its prayers for peace; that its prayers will be offered in the name of God who calls us all to a greater love for each other, our neighbours, those who are strangers to us and our enemies.
F.2. Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council:
1. Welcomes the proposed return of UN Weapons Inspectors to Iraq;
2. Calls on the government of Iraq to comply fully with UN resolution 687;
3. Believes that, on present evidence, military action against Iraq is not morally justified;
4. Calls, subject to reports from UN Weapons Inspectors, for sanctions, except for materials that could be used for Weapons of mass destruction, to be lifted.
F.3. Solidarity with ECUSA Position on Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council affirms its solidarity with the position taken by the Episcopal Church, USA, in June 2002, in opposing unilateral military action against Iraq by the United States, and with the view expressed by the Presiding Bishop in his statement of 6 September 2002, that:
1. war holds the prospect of destabilizing the Middle East and we will all be better served to see our national energies and resources expended in resolving the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, such that Israel finds security and peace with its neighbours and Palestinians achieve statehood;
2. military action would surely inflame the passions of millions, particularly in the Arab world, setting in motion cycles of violence and retaliation, further straining tenuous relationships that exist between the United States and other nations;
3. the United States has the opportunity to express leadership in the world by forging a foreign policy that seeks to reconcile and heal the world's divisions and reflect its values and ideals by focusing upon issues of poverty, disease and despair, not only within the US but throughout the global community of which it is a part. CARRIED #34-11-02
Notes
Note re F2.2 It was noted that there has been a United Nations' resolution subsequent to 687.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (12th : 2002 : Hong Kong, China) - Resolutions
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - Iraq
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Iraq War, 2003 - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
United States - Foreign relations - Iraq
United States - Foreign relations - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
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Anglican Primate deplores armed intrusion into Jerusalem cathedral

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9112
Date
2004 November 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2004 November 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, Nov. 12 [2004]
Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has written to Canadian Foreign Minister Pierre Pettigrew asking the government to express concern to the government of Israel over an armed intrusion into St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Jerusalem.
On Thursday, Anglican Bishop Riah Abu El-Assal of Jerusalem reported that about 30 armed Israeli officers entered the cathedral to arrest Mordecai [sic Mordechai] Vanunu. (Mr. Vanunu, a former nuclear technician, was released from jail last April after serving 18 years for revealing details of Israel's plans to develop nuclear weapons.)
Archbishop Hutchison also wrote a letter to Bishop Riah, saying he deplored "the seemingly excessive force that was used at the cathedral".
The text of the Canadian Primate's two letters follows:
Letter to Foreign Minister Pierre Pettigrew
Earlier this week an incident happened in Jerusalem, which has greatly disturbed me and members of the Anglican Church of Canada. Israeli special police entered in force the grounds of St. George's Anglican Cathedral to apprehend Mordecao Vanunu. Bishop Riah H. Abu El-Assal has reported on the traumatic effect this action had on the tourists, pilgrims and others who were present.
At a time when the issue of sanctuary is in the headlines in Canada, this incident brings to our attention once more the inappropriateness of breaching this longstanding tradition and right. I ask that you convey to the government of Israel our concern and that of the Canadian people over this unfortunate incident.
I have assured Bishop Riah of the church's support and prayers as his people, mainly Palestinian Anglicans, move through a period of shock as the nation mourns the death of President Yasser Arafat. I have also expressed my hope that new ways may now be found to enable the people of Israel and Palestine to live in peace, and to flourish.
Letter to Bishop Riah H. Abu El-Assal
I was saddened and alarmed by the news in your letter to me and other Primates about the incident at St. George's Cathedral earlier this week. From your report the actions of the Israeli special police force seem quite inappropriate and offensive. There has been a very longstanding tradition of respecting the holy places, not just in Jerusalem but around the world, and the breaching of the right of sanctuary is not acceptable. I deplore the seemingly excessive force that was used at the cathedral close as the police took Mordecai Vanunu into custody, shocking and traumatizing those tourist, pilgrims and others who were present.
I am writing to the Canadian foreign minister, the Honourable Pierre Pettigrew urging him to express these concerns to the government of Israel.
Please be assured of our continuing prayers for you and for your church as you recover from this incident, and as you live through this time of mourning for President Yasser Arafat. My prayer is that new ways may be found to enable the people of Israel and Palestine to live in peace, and to flourish.
Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate
- 30 -
For more information, please contact: Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Director of Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 306; scarriere@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Vanunu, Mordechai, 1954-
St. George's Anglican Cathedral (Jerusalem)
El-Assal, Riah Abu
Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East. Diocese of Jerusalem
Hutchison, Andrew S. (Andrew Sandford), 1938-
Sanctuary movement - Israel
Israel - Politics and government - 1993-
Palestinian Arabs - Israel
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arafat, Yasser, 1929-2004
Church and state - Israel
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Anglican Primate Responds to CJC Statement

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1624
Date
1990 April 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1990 April 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto -- Anglican Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of Canada, today expressed his disappointment that the Canadian Jewish Congress has issued a statement attacking his recent pastoral letter, sent last month to Anglican clergy.
Archbishop Peers recently toured the Middle East as part of a delegation of Canadian church leaders. The group met with Jews, Palestinians, and Israeli government officials.
The pastoral letter dealt with three issues: Christian unity in the Middle East; Christian-Jewish history; and the human rights of Palestinians, especially in the occupied territories.
Archbishop Peers said he regrets the fact that his letter has been misunderstood as an attack on the Jewish people. In fact, he notes, a major section of the letter reviewed the "unfortunate and at times tragic" history of Christian Jewish relations, and called for "repentance about the history of Christian anti-semitism." It reminds clergy of the importance, especially during Holy Week, of avoiding any reference that might suggest anti-Jewish feelings.
The letter does not attempt to deal with the Arab-Israeli conflict, nor with Jewish experience, nor with the history of Israel. Enclosed with the letter was a "Prayer from Jerusalem", written by the heads of churches in Jerusalem, and commended to Canadian Christians at their request.
"We value the relationships we have built between the Anglican and Jewish communities over the years," Archbishop Peers said. "These have resulted in significant changes in our teaching and liturgy. We need continued dialogue and openness over matters in which there are sincerely held differences of opinion."
EXCERPTS FROM THE PASTORAL LETTER
Christian Unity
The holy sites which testify to [Jesus'] ministry and sacrifice also testify to the continuing disunity of Christians after two thousand years.
On every site you find at least two altars, sometimes two churches (sometimes three!). Catholic, Orthodox, Armenian and Protestant monuments situate themselves side by side in almost every place. Sometimes, to my eyes, they seemed to jostle and compete, though I tried hard to look at them as offering a united witness.
...in Cyprus, we saw concrete proof that the desire for unity is genuine. For the first time in 1500 years the leaders and representatives of the four "families" of churches in the Middle East gathered together to confront the issues that divide them and the region. It is, as the world knows, one of the most bitterly divided regions on earth. Christians, Muslims and Jews all have a special responsibility for the people who live there and for the future of peace in the area.
The Occupied Territories
...Christians in the Middle East are almost entirely Arabs. In Israel/Palestine the Church is made up largely of Palestinian congregations. From the time of Christ to the present they are the people who have borne continuing witness to the Gospel in the land of its origin. Now, through our churches, they are appealing to us to hear them, to see them, and to pray for them.
They have written a prayer which we are asked to offer in public worship on April 8...
Christian-Jewish History
The history of relations between Christians and Jews has been unfortunate and at times tragic. The earliest stages of it, in apostolic times, were characterised by Jewish objections to Christian preaching and ministry. Because these were the times in which the New Testament was being formed, echoes of anti-Jewish attitudes are discernable in the Scriptures, and later contributed in forming the basis of Christian feeling toward Jews in different times and circumstances when the power relationships were completely reversed.
In my mind there is no doubt that anti-Jewish sentiments in the Church laid the social and cultural groundwork for economic and political action against Jewish people from expulsion of Jews from England and Spain, for example, to the pogroms of the 19th century and, ultimately, the Holocaust in Europe. Jews today rightly point to the relative silence of Christians during that period of their suffering, and condemn us for selective indignation when we look critically at some of the complex issues in the Middle East.
I believe we must engage in acts of repentance about the history of Christian anti-semitism. I do not think we may deny it, avoid it, or justify it. Broken relationships can only be reconciled when there is a willingness and honesty to confront both pain and responsibility.
Palestinian Human Rights
One of the false stereotypes many of us have is that of the Palestinian people. They are frequently portrayed to us as terrorists. While terrorist acts have been committed in the Palestinian cause, it is a distortion when applied to the people as a whole. Those who live in the occupied territories do so, for the most part, in misery and oppression. They suffer daily assaults upon their dignity and freedom, and I believe we must not allow our sense of guilt toward Jews to silence us in the face of the reality of the Palestinians.
As Christians, we are called to solidarity with all who suffer. When they also happen to be our brothers and sisters in Christ, who have borne witness to the Gospel in the land where Jesus died and rose again, we have a double responsibility. That is why Holy Week and Easter this year will be particularly important to me. When I walk the way of the Cross next month symbolically in a Church in Canada, I will be seeing the faces of the Christians I met in the Holy Land, and I will be praying for peace and unity for them and for all the peoples of the region.
Notes
For further information, contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Communications, (416) 924-9192 (bus.), (416) 335-8349 (res.)
Subjects
Canadian Jewish Congress
Christianity and other religions - Judaism - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and other religions - Judaism - Canada
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Antisemitism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and antisemitism - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Middle East
Christian union - Israel
Human rights - Middle East
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[Appeal to Jews and Arabs to Settle Differences]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5153
Date
1973 October 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1973 October 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Leaders of two Christian Churches in Canada today appealed to both Arabs and Jews to settle their differences by peace conference.
Most Reverend E.W. Scott, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Right Reverend N. Bruce McLeod, Moderator of the United Church of Canada have called upon their "Arab and Jewish brothers to condemn the inhumanity of war."
In a joint communique the church leaders say; "Some of us in the Christian community recognize the mixture of pride and fear which has fed the continuing crisis in the Middle East from both sides.
"We affirm, however, our belief that Israel has the right to live, and to live in peace."
"We declare also our concern for the right of the Palestinians and all people in the Middle East to live in peace."
"We call upon our Arab and Jewish brothers to condemn the inhumanity of war, and to urge upon their leaders an early peace conference which would satisfy the reasonable claims of the Palestinians and guarantee Israel her safety."
"We pray for the peace of Jerusalem."
-30 -
For more information contact:
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
Anglican Church of Canada
(416) 924-9192
or
Mr. Norman Vale
United Church of Canada
(416) 925-5931
Subjects
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
McLeod, Bruce (N. Bruce)
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - United Church of Canada
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Christianity
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Arab/Israeli Relations

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1504
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 6-2-88
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 6-2-88
Mover
Bishop Brown
Seconder
Bishop Finlay
Prologue
The Primate read the following telegram to the House of Bishops from Canon Shafik Farah of Toronto:
"I pray you take a stand and speak out for peace with justice regarding the Palestinian/Israeli situation and for an end to the ongoing massacres in the occupied territories on the Gaza strip. How many more should die? And for how long should we wait ?"
Text
That this House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada deeply regrets the acts of violence in the occupied territories of the West Bank and in the Gaza Strip. The Bishops endorse the proposal by the Anglican Consultative Council for an international conference for peace in which all parties affected would be present.
The Bishops call on the Government of Canada and all peace-loving citizens to promote and support such a proposal." CARRIED
Subjects
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Middle East - Congresses
Palestinian Arabs - Israel
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Middle East
Farah, Shafik Amin, 1923-2002
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Bishop, Israeli envoy's talks cordial

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article24742
Author
Bettson, Bob
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1998 April
Author
Bettson, Bob
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1998 April
Volume
124
Issue
4
Page
17
Notes
Bishop John Baycroft of Ottawa met with Israeli Ambassador David Sultan to discuss the Bishop's Christmas sermon in which he criticized Israel's treatment of Palestinian Arabs.
Subjects
Baycroft, John A. (John Arthur), 1933-
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Canadian Primate expresses condolences on death of Yasser Arafat

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8834
Date
2004 November 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2004 November 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, November 11, 2004 -- Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada has extended compassionate condolences to the people of Palestine on the death of their leader, Yasser Arafat. The Palestinian President, died in a hospital in France Thursday at the age of 75.
"President Arafat was a pivotal figure in the Middle East for more than a generation", the Anglican Primate said. "He is the only leader many younger Palestinians have ever known. President Arafat's people and family are in my thoughts today and in the face of an uncertain future, I urge all Anglicans to continue to pray for peace and stability in the Middle East".
- 30 -
For more information, please contact: Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Director of Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 306; scarriere@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Arafat, Yasser, 1929-2004
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Churches push for Gaza peace : civilians on both sides are suffering

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35540
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 February
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 February
Volume
135
Issue
2
Page
1, 9
Notes
"The Anglican Church of Canada in January [2009] joined other members of the Anglican Communion and churches worldwide in calling for a ceasefire and a redoubling of efforts to secure lasting peace in Gaza, where thousands have been killed or injured after renewed fighting between Israeli military forces and the militant Palestinian group Hamas". "Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, called for 'an immediate cessation to the horrific violence' in Gaza which erupted on Dec. 27 [2008]." "The national bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC), Susan Johnson who was part of a delegation that traveled in the Middle East last month [January 2009], urged Prime Minister Harper to reconsider the Canadian government's position that solely blamed Hamas for the violence". "During a meeting with Israel's chief rabbis, visiting Lutheran bishops also told Israel's chief rabbis that the conduct of Israel's military campaign raised questions about a 'just war theory', noting the 'proportionality and killing of innocents', reported Ecumenical News International." The Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) "also responded to the emergency appeals from ACT (Action by Churches Together) with an initial grant of $20,000". The Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem, Suheil S. Dawani "asked for prayers and financial support as the Al Ahli Arab Hospital, an institution supported by the diocese, struggled to provide critical health care in the area".
Article also includes photo with caption: "About 700 protesters demonstrate on Parliament Hill, against Israel's military action in Gaza. Among speakers condemning the attacks were Jews and Christians, including Anglican priest Robert Assaly of Ottawa."
Subjects
Gaza Strip - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arab-Israeli conflict - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Relations - Palestinian Arabs
Israel - Politics and government
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hamas
Violence - Middle East
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Johnson, Susan C., 1958-
Assaly, Robert
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Council of General Synod: Special focus on Jerusalem

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38375
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Volume
139
Issue
5
Page
6
Notes
The General Synod will be presented this July [2013] with resolutions focusing on 'peace with justice for all in Palestine and Israel' and educating Canadian Anglicans about the 'life and witness' of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem". This includes working together includes working together in such areas as educating members about 'the impact of the illegal settlements on the lives of both Palestinians and Israelis, and about imported products identified as produced in or related to the illegal settlements and misleadingly labelled as produced in Israel, and about the complexities of economic advocacy measures'. The resolution does not call for a boycott of such products from Israeli settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem, a measure the UCC [United Church of Canada] adopted at its General Council in 2012. CoGS also recommended a resolution to observe the seventh Sunday of Easter as Jerusalem Sunday. On that day, commonly known as the Sunday after the Ascension, special focus will be given to learning about the Diocese of Jerusalem, which covers the areas of Jerusalem, Palestine, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. A special collection will also be requested for that diocese's ministries in education, reconciliation, health care and hospitality. The Anglican Church of Canada and the Jerusalem diocese have been in companion relationship for many years".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (40th : 2013 : Ottawa, Ont.) - Resolutions
Joint Assembly (1st : 2013 : Ottawa, Ont.) - Resolutions
Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East. Diocese of Jerusalem
Jerusalem - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Jerusalem Sunday
Israel - Politics and government
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arab-Israeli conflict - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Deepening ties with Jerusalem: Primate calls for enhanced relationship and initiatives to launch at General Synod

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35896
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2009 October
Volume
135
Issue
8
Page
1, 10
Notes
The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, accompanied by Andrea Mann, global relations coordinator for the General Synod, visited the Episcopal diocese of Jerusalem from 22-30 August 2009. The diocese is led by Bishop Suheil Dawani who has accepted an invitation from Archbishop Hiltz to attend the 2010 Canadian General Synod "to address the General Synod on the life and witness of the church in the holy land .... Part of that inevitably will touch on the political situation there". "The diocese has 27 parishes, 30 priests and 7,000 parishioners across Palestine, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon and Syria. 'Bishop Dawani's mindset is "There's room in Jerusalem for everyone; we just have to find a way for that to be a reality".'" The Primate and Andrea Mann also visited Gaza including time spent at the diocesan-run Al Ahli Arab Hospital and St. Philip's Anglican Church where he celebrated communion.
Subjects
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East. Diocese of Jerusalem
Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East. Diocese of Jerusalem - Statistics
Jerusalem - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East
Gaza Strip - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arab-Israeli conflict - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arab-Israeli conflict - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East
Al Ahli Arab Hospital (Gaza)
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56 records – page 1 of 6.