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Addressing crimes against native women

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40025
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 May
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 May
Volume
140
Issue
5
Page
13
Notes
"On March 8 [2014], Toronto's Church of the Redeemer hosted a teach-in on missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls in Canada. Black signs ... bore the names and ages of murdered women. Keynote speaker Dr. Dawn Lavell-Harvard, vice-president of the Native Women's Association of Canada, outlined challenges faced by aboriginal females -- from poverty and predators to racism and systemic oppression. 'Our women experience greater rates of poverty, incarceration, child welfare apprehension, more violence' she said. 'They are more likely to go missing, more likely to be murdered and less likely to ever see justice'." The Native Women's Association of Canada has documented the cases of more than 600 missing or murdered women, and is tracking them at a rate of three to four new cases each month". Lavell-Harvard expressed anger at the federal government's refusal to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing women".
Subjects
Indigenous women - Violence against - Canada
Indigenous women - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native women - Violence against - Canada
Native women - Crimes against - Canada
Murder victims - Canada
Native Women's Association of Canada
Lavell-Harvard, Dawn (Dawn Memee), 1974-
Anglican Church of the Redeemer (Toronto, Ont.)
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Bishops discuss changes to church structures, marriage canon

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40158
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 June
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 June
Volume
141
Issue
6
Page
12
Notes
"When the House of Bishops met in Niagara Falls, Ont., from April 13 to 17 [2015], they discussed some contentious issues, including possible amendments to the marriage canon and a call from the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) for significant changes to church structures. But Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, said there was, nevertheless, 'a spirit of hopefulness' at the gathering". "The bishops discussed the document, 'Where We Are Today: Twenty Years after the Covenant, an Indigenous Call to Church Leadership', in terms of what they thought needed more clarification, what they found encouraging and what they found challenging." "Hiltz observed that what underlies much of these discussions is the question, 'What is everybody's understanding of self-determination ?' This is a conversation that needs to continue, he said. People are not sure what self-determination will mean in terms of concrete changes, said Hiltz". "Bishops also endorsed the #22days campaign calling Anglicans to commit to working toward healing and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. ... Hiltz noted that Bishop Robert Hardwick of the diocese of Qu'Appelle shared plans to ring church bells for murdered and missing women and girls, and other bishops decided that could be done in all of their dioceses".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops - Meetings
Marriage (Canon law) - Anglican Church of Canada
Marriage - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Same sex unions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Leadership - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Structure
Where We Are Today: Twenty Years after the Covenant, and Indigenous Call to Church Leadership
22 Days Campaign
Hardwick, Robert, 1956-
Church bells - Anglican Church of Canada
Native women - Crimes against - Canada
Missing persons - Canada
Murder - Investigation - Canada
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Human trafficking advocacy to focus on Indigenous victims

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41614
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2018 January
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2018 January
Volume
144
Issue
1
Page
9
Notes
In a presentation to the Council of General Synod (CoGS) on 11 November 2017, Ryan Weston, the church's lead animator of public witness for social and ecological justice described "the work the national church has been undertaking to fight human traffficking since CoGS voted last June [2017] to endorse an anti-human trafficking resolution passed by the Anglican Consultative Council in 2012". Because of the scale of the problem it was decided, firstly, "that the church should focus on fighting human trafficking in its connection with missing and murdered Indigenous 'women and girls, and men and boys', Weston said". Secondly, "[t]he church will also focus on the issue of sexual exploitation, which is related, he said, since an estimated 50% of the women and girls being trafficked for se in Canada are Indigenous". "A third focus of the work, Weston said, will be issues around the federal government's Temporary Foreign Worker Program, which allows Canadian employers to hire foreigners for short-term work".
Subjects
Weston, Ryan
Human trafficking - Canada
Human trafficking - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Human trafficking - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Native women - Crimes against - Canada
Native women - Violence against - Canada
Sex crimes - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Sexual abuse - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Walking together: A justice that is waiting

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38722
Author
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 December
Author
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 December
Volume
139
Issue
10
Page
5
Notes
The author considers "the over 600 missing and murdered indigenous women -- women who died because of their vulnerability to violence, women whose deaths seem neither to be mourned nor even noticed by the government of Canada and the majority of the Canadian public. There are close to one and a half million indigenous people in Canada, slightly more than the population of Ottawa. Imagine if 600 women from Ottawa were to disappear in a similar fashion. Would the government -- or anyone -- tolerate their disappearance ? Wouldn't we work urgently and tirelessly until every woman was accounted for, until all women were safe ?" "We are sadly, witnesses of such hideous evil -- certainly, in the growing worldwide poverty, which so disproportionately impacts women and children, but just as really and dramatically in the indigenous women whose tragic lives have been denied justice".
Author is "national indigenous bishop of the Anglican Church of Canada".
Subjects
Peter, Titus, 1920-2008
Indigenous women - Violence against - Canada
Native women - Crimes against - Canada
Indian women - Violence against - Canada
Native women - Violence against - Canada
Missing persons - Canada
Murder - Investigation - Canada
Marginality, Social - Canada
Indigenous women - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Justice - Canada
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