Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

14 records – page 1 of 2.

22-day campaign to focus on Healing Fund

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40756
Author
Staff
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 June
Author
Staff
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 June
Volume
143
Issue
6
Page
15
Notes
"The Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod has requested bishops and deans to focus, for 22 days, from May 31 to June 21 [2017], on renewing the church's commitment to support the work of the Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation through prayers, participation in awareness-raising campaigns and donations. Early this year [2017], Council of General Synod (CoGS) agreed to dedicate the undesignated proceeds of Giving with Grace, General Synod's annual fundraising campaign, to replenish the fund. For the next five years, the fund -- created in 1992 as part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement -- will focus on language recovery". General Secretary, Archdeacon Michael Thompson, "stressed that while the Anglican Church of Canada has met its legal obligations under the settlement agreement, 'we're far from finished with our spiritual and moral obligation to continue to support the healing work that is underway among those survivors and in those communities'."
Subjects
Giving with Grace
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Fund raising - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA)
Settlement Agreement
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
22 Days Campaign
Thompson, Michael (Michael James), 1956-
Less detail

Across Canada: 'Vanner' turns 100

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38325
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 April
Author
Swift, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 April
Volume
139
Issue
4
Page
2
Notes
"On March 19 [2013], Mildred Richardson of Tavistock, Ont., reached her 100th birthday. She received a congratulatory certificate from Archbishop Fred Hiltz. Richardson has spent a lifetime serving the Anglican church. A former grade school teacher, in the 1940s she spent two summers plying the back roads of northern British Columbia in a two-ton Sunday school van. 'It wasn't for everyone. You were far away from the amenities of home and you had to keep in shape', recalls Richardson. As a 'vanner' she drove one of Eva Hasell's 24 vehicles that brought Anglican teaching to rural Canada from 1920 to the 1970s. 'If your van broke down on an isolated road, you had to wait until help came along', Richardson recalls. Luckily, the big Fords were equipped with beds. 'We had a little camping stove and we ate mostly out of cans', she says. 'Sometimes we got invited to dinner, and sometimes people held canned-goods "showers" for us'. Her 35-year teaching career included two years at Indian residential schools in Alberta. 'What upset me most was that the children were punished for speaking their native language', she says. 'You'd be surprised how quickly I could turn deaf'." [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Richardson, Mildred R., 1913-2013
Sunday school teachers - Anglican Church of Canada
Christian education - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada. Sunday School Caravan Mission
Women church workers - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Less detail

Bible translation was 25 years in the making

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34923
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 November
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 November
Volume
133
Issue
9
Page
3
Notes
The New Testament is now available in the Naskapi language, the fruit of 25 years of translation work by Silas Nabinicaboo, a lay reader of the aboriginal church in Kawawachikamach, Quebec.
Subjects
Bible. New Testament. Naskapi. 2007
Naskapi language
Translating and interpreting - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Nabinicaboo, Silas
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Quebec
Canadian Bible Society
Less detail

Communities of Change: Modern Ways to Sustain an Ancient Language

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38137
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2012 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2012 October
Page
3
Notes
"The Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation currently numbers around 10,000 people -- mostly living on Vancouver Island. What alarms staff at the Nuu-chah-nulth Economic Development Corporation (NEDC), a PWRDF partner, is that only about 2% of the population are fluent in their own language and most of those fluent speakers are over 65 years of age. PWRDF has been working with NEDC to fund a series of projects which aim to preserve the Nuu-chah-nulth language. The methods of preserving and teaching this ancient language are very modern. NEDC is funding groups that are using Facebook to link speakers of Nuu-chah-nulth together, YouTube to share videos of elders speaking the language, DVDs featuring pronunciation guides for the (newly) written language, and more. Nuu-chah-nulth was purely an oral language until recently, so most fluent speakers aren't literate in it".
Subjects
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Grants
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Nuu-chah-nulth Indians
Nootka Indians
Less detail

Conserving the Cree language

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41045
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 April
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2014 April
Volume
140
Issue
4
Page
10
Notes
The Very Rev. Ken Davis, dean of St. Alban's Cathedral in Prince Albert, Sask. wanted to learn Cree when he arrived in Prince Albert in 2010. "Davis discovered he was not alone in wanting to learn Cree. Loss of ancestral language, identified as one of the tragic consequences of residential schools, had affected many third-and-fourth generation natives". After securing a $15,000 grant from the Anglican Healing Fund, the cathedral is now hosting a 39-week Cree language class. The class is taught by the Rev. Samuel Halkett, a diocesan deacon. "Cree was Halkett's first spoken language. He also studied the language formally -- learning its grammar and structure. Cree is 'a beautiful, smooth language', with different dialects, he explained. He's teaching the Y dialect, the easiest and most commonly used. Response has been phenomenal; the program was designed for only 20 people, but 79 signed up. The classes have fostered 'a great spirit of fellowship and good humour', Davis said".
Subjects
Cree language - Spoken Cree
Cree language - Study and teaching
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Davis, Kenneth
Halkett, Samuel
St. Alban's Anglican Cathedral (Prince Albert, Sask.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Aboriginal Healing Fund
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation
Less detail

Healing Fund's work to continue past 2017

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40504
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 March
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 March
Volume
143
Issue
3
Page
1, 14
Notes
"The Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation has been given a new lease on life in its 25th year, following a decision by Council of General Synod (CoGS) to dedicate the undesignated proceeds of General Synod's annual fundraising campaign to replenish it. In 2015, the campain Giving with Grace raised $15,000 according to audited figures from General Synod. But the hope is that with a dedicated purpose, the campaign will be able to raise $1 million, enough to replenish the fund for five years. In line with the stipulations of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the fund was to spend the last of its money by 2019. Once the money it had been granted through the settlement fund has run out, the future of the fund was uncertain. The last of the fund's money was budgeted for 2017" (p. 1). Esther "Wesley, who has served as co-ordinator since 2001, said the Canadian Anglican church could not 'afford not to go on [supporting]' the Healing Fund's work. 'Some form of [funding] has to fo on if we are serious about reconciliation', she said. 'Not just words but action -- that's what people are looking for'. The decision allows the fund's work to continue, but it will be in a reduced capacity. For the past 10 years, the fund has been disbursing between $300,000 and $600,000 a year, and Wesley said the new budget of $200,000 will require the fund to be more focused in what it supports. Wesley believes the area where the fund can effect the most change is through language preservation" (p. 14).
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation - Anniversaries, etc.
Giving with Grace - Anniversaries, etc.
Fund raising - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA)
Settlement Agreement
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of General Synod
Electronic voting - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Thompson, Michael (Michael James), 1956-
Haines-Turner, Cynthia
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Wesley, Esther
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Less detail

Letter to the editor: Anglican priest spoke out against residential schools -- to no avail

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38914
Author
Paget, Kay Alderwood
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 October
Author
Paget, Kay Alderwood
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 October
Volume
141
Issue
8
Page
5
Notes
"On reading this very sad story of how our Indigenous people were treated ('Residential schools a form of 'cultural genocide', says TRC [Truth and Reconciliation Commission] report', anglicanjournal.com, June 2, 2015), I keep thinking how things could have been different. In 1943, my father, Archdeacon Henry Alderwood, was almost coerced by his bishop to accept the position of superintendent of the Anglican schools. He, of course, had to travel across the land to visit the schools, and he soon realized how wrong the whole concept was. When his office moved to Ottawa in 1946, he began to confront the government officials who were really in charge. One thing he found most distressing was forcing the children to speak English only; most knew no English when they arrived but were expected to know it somehow. The officials would not listen to my dad, or agree to any changes. This broke his heart (he compared those children with his own seven happy youngsters). He died of a heart attack at age 58, missing out on 23 grandchildren to come. He tried his best, but all in vain". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Alderwood, Henry ("Harry"), 1888-1947
Less detail

PWRDF helps save a critically endangered language

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38774
Author
Fred, Caledonia
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Author
Fred, Caledonia
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Page
3
Notes
"In 2003, Nuu-chah-nulth people feared their language would be lost. Less than 1 % of members could speak their language fluently .... A couple of books and tape cassettes were all that that teachers had as tools to assist them in their lessons. At that time, PWRDF partnered with the Nuu-chah-nulth Economic Development Corporation (NEDC) to establish a program that would result in many thousands of copies of over 150 additional resources from flashcards to on-line tools. The materials developed in the program have been essential to the preservation of the Nuu-chah-nulth language".
Subjects
Nuu-chah-nulth Indians
Nuu-chah-nulth language
Nootka Indians
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Grants
Less detail

Revitalizing a language and culture

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38773
Author
Tarbell, Reaghan
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Author
Tarbell, Reaghan
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Page
2, 4
Notes
"Kahnawa:ke Mohawk Territory is located on the south shore of Montreal, Quebec. We are a community of approximately 8,000 people with a unique culture, history and language". "The mandate of the Kanien'keha:ka Onkwawen:na Raotitiohkwa Language and Cultural Centre (KORLCC) is to promote and preserve our language and culture. There are a variety of ways that we, a committed but small staff, do this with the support of funders like PWRDF".
Subjects
Mohawk language
Mohawk Indians - Qubec (Province) - Kahnawake Indian Reserve - Ethnic identity
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Grants
Less detail

A time to heal: Building a legacy of hope [advertisement]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40726
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 May
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 May
Volume
143
Issue
5
Page
16
Notes
Full-page advertisement for Giving with Grace, The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada. "For 25 years, the Anglican Church of Canada has funded healing projects in Indigenous communities. This year, let's renew our commitment through Giving with Grace. One important dimension of any healing journey is having a place to share the truth about what happened. The EagleSpeaker Community Connection Society is developing a powerful new resource that comes out of consultation with more than 200 Residential Schools survivors and their families. This multi-media resource in a graphic novel style focuses on language restoration in response to the impact of the schools. Help raise $1 million in 2017 for healing work ahead."
Subjects
Giving with Grace
Fund raising - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Anglican Church of Canada. Aboriginal Healing Fund
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation
Native peoples - Canada - Languages
EagleSpeaker Community Connection Society
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.