Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Dr. Florence Haslam

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article28715
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2001 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2001 October
Volume
127
Issue
8
Page
13
Notes
Obituary. "Dr Florence Haslam, an Anglican and daughter of medical missionaries who was awarded the Order of Canada in 1974 for her healthcare work in India, died in May [2001] at the age of 93 in Toronto". "Her parents, Rev. [Robert Henry Albert] Haslam and Dr. Jean Hoyles Haslam, established the Maple Leaf Hospital in the Kangra region of northern India in 1907." "Dr. Florence Haslam stayed in India 40 years, returning to Canada in 1974".
Subjects
Haslam, Florence, 1907-1993
Missionaries - Anglican Church of Canada
Missionaries, Medical - Anglican Church of Canada
Women missionaries - Anglican Church of Canada
Maple Leaf Hospital (Kangra, India)
Less detail

A Great Doctor Who Served in India

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35226
Author
Haslam, Florence, 1907-1993
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Women's Stories
Date
1988 Spring

[Jane Allen Returns to Family Planning Project]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5253
Date
1968 August 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1968 August 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Nearing the end of a furlough after seven years' service as a nurse in India for the Anglican Church of Canada, Jane E. Allen of London, Ontario, returned to the sub-continent in August to assist in a long-range educational project which aims to curb the rapidly-mounting birth rate.
The ecumenical Family Planning Project, started in 1966 by the Christian Medical Association of India, is backed by the government and the Indian National Council of Churches. Expansion of the work calls for eight teams, each consisting of a doctor, nurses and social workers. They will establish birth control programs at more than 400 hospitals and medical centres affiliated with the association. Medical staffs realize that present problems stem from the population explosion and efforts at a solution must be given top priority.
Irish-born Miss Allen will work in North India as she is fluent in Punjabi as well as the Hindustani language. She will be supported financially by the Anglican Church of Canada. Prior to her furlough she had been attached to Maple Leaf Hospital at Kangra, founded by Canadian Anglicans 60 years ago.
"The government is having difficulty in getting the largely illiterate population to practice family planning," said Miss Allen. "Parents still rely on their children for support in old age as no government assistance is provided. They believe that children are the gift of God and male descendants are important, particularly to Hindus."
Miss Allen said the Lippes Loop intra-uterine device, introduced on a mass scale in 1965, has played a useful role, but care must be taken in educating people regarding its function and proper use. Conventional methods for birth control also are freely available, but family planning lags because of fear, prejudice, apathy and lack of education.
With a population of more than 500,000,000, India's birth rate stands about 41 per thousand, nearly three times as high as the current death rate which has been dramatically reduced in the last half century by improved medical services. Christian hospitals have contact with 12,000,000 people annually who would benefit from the proposed family planning program.
Miss Allen explained that each of the teams will visit two or three hospitals monthly, taking with them literature, equipment and a variety of visual aids. They will hold classes for doctors, nurses and hospital maintenance staff who will develop family planning programs under competent medical leadership.
After training as a nurse in England, Miss Allen had three years' experience in the United States before coming to Canada where she took a course at the Anglican Women's Training College here. She went to India in 1961.
Subjects
Allen, Jane E.
Missionaries, Medical - Anglican Church of Canada
Birth control - India
Birth control - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Letters from Overseas: Eldoret, Kenya: A frontier town

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39252
Author
Parker, Helen
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1995 September
Author
Parker, Helen
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1995 September
Volume
[2]
Issue
[2]
Page
17
Notes
The author is a Volunteer in Mission from the Diocese of British Columbia serving in Kenya. She is currently in Eldoret by "My work permits are still not ready. When they are I'll have to go back to Nairobi. I'm still not certain what my role will be". "The nurses I work with back home would never believe it. Unfortunately one of the little ones we saw yesterday came to the hospital this morning -- rushed him to Eldoret, but he died of meningitis before he could get further help. We are waiting for vaccine. We are in Eldoret, having taken four children to the hospital in Kibuir for assessment and bringing a fifth child back -- an amputation and skin graft. The others we'll take again in March for surgery". "So far, have had no problems with altitude. I was warned of possible headaches, nosebleeds, and shortness of breath, but so far OK".
Subjects
Volunteers in Mission - Anglican Church of Canada
Volunteers in Mission - Anglican Church of Kenya
Missionaries, Medical - Anglican Church of Canada
Missionaries, Medical - Kenya
Medical care - Kenya
Less detail

The Longings of the Heart: The Women of St. Luke's Mission Hospital, Pangnirtung, 1930-1972

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article37399
Author
Farrell, Emily Cowall
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
2004 Fall
Author
Farrell, Emily Cowall
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
2004 Fall
Volume
46
Issue
2
Page
[129]-150
Notes
"Blacklead Island [Anglican] mission provided medical care between 1894-1913 and afterward, the Anglican mission would return to Pangnirtung where the first hospital in the Eastern Arctic would be built in 1930 and remain in operation until 1972. This case study examines the place of women within the role of medical care and the spiritual ministry. The subtle impact of the relationship between the Inuit and Anglo-Canadian women who worked at St. Luke's hospital is demonstrated by their participation in adopting cultural components into their ministry and nursing combined with personal relationships as members of the larger community outside of roles or duties" (p. 130). "Recruitment of women for service as missionaries was conducted initially through a process of application managed by the Missionary Society of the Church of England [in Canada] and continued with the Woman's Auxiliary" (p. 133). "Their primary role was to serve as a missionary and nursing was a mechanism to reach the goal of 'winning souls for the Master'" (p. 134). "This study examines two nurses, [Edith Prudence] Hockin (appointed 1931-36, 1940-45, 1962) and Florence Hirst (appointed 1934-1939) during their service at St. Luke's Hospital, Pangnirtung, revealing a view of how changing trends and attitudes toward women in the mission field, nursing care technology and their relationships with the Inuit community influence their role" (p. 134). "St. Luke was the first hospital in the eastern arctic and 'central to the care of some 800 Inuit and white people scattered throughout the region'. The duties of the nurse in charge would include management of the functional operations of the facility, including records, reporting and communication with the Anglican Diocese of the Arctic" (p. 135). "In 1935 Hockin and Hirst eagerly formed the Pangnirtung Woman's Auxiliary (W.A.) Chapter to enlist women and girls into active participation in missionary and social work of the church. Providing a W.A. Chapter was the most important venue available for direct missionary work brought the Inuit women in closer contact with the nurses, removing them from their professional role into accessibility for cultural integration with women in the community" (p. 138). "This is a history of adventurous and resilient people, dedicated to their ideals. In total, 42 women missionary nurses lived and worked at St. Luke's hospital. .... The Inuit informants participating in this study long for the 'caring care' provided by the women who were friends, missionaries and nurses. We know that the history of the relationship between missionaries and natives in Canada is one of conflict, but in this particular case, what stands out is the enduring cultural memory of this mission's medical successes" (p. 145).
Article, which includes illustrations, is divided into sections: Introduction -- The Anglican Church Mission in the Cumberland Sound 1894-1913 -- Anglican Women Missionaries -- The Mission of Nursing -- The Women's Auxiliary -- In the Community -- The Closure of St. Luke's -- Conclusion.
Subjects
St. Luke's Hospital (Pangnirtung, NWT)
St. Luke's Hospital (Panniqtuuq, NT)
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Women missionaries - Anglican Church of Canada
Missionaries, Medical - Anglican Church of Canada
Nursing - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hockin, Prudence (Edith Prudence), 1903-1991
Nicholson, Florence (Flossie) Hirst, d. 1974
Less detail