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Action against Iraq "unjustifiable", Anglican Primate says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7020
Date
1998 February 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 February 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, (February 19) -- Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has issued a statement in which he says that military action against Iraq cannot lead to a more stable or peaceful Middle East. He urged church members to pray for "a just and peaceable outcome in this tense situation".
The text of the statement:
"Once again it appears possible that Canada may join with the United States in a punitive attack against Iraq.
"In similar circumstances seven years ago I issued a moral reflection on that action based upon the classic Christian criteria for determining the justifiability of a particular war, and judged by those criteria such aggressive intervention was not justified then.
"I believe that this judgment still stands in the present circumstances and I urge continued diplomatic efforts toward resolution.
"One of the traditional criteria requires that the use of force be proportional to the situation. The proposed military intervention arises from the Iraqi government's continued defiance of United Nations resolutions. Of course, the most satisfactory outcome would be compliance by the Iraqi government with the United Nations resolutions. However, South Africa's defiance during the apartheid years was met with sanctions, not force, and Israel's defiance of UN resolutions about the occupation of Palestinian territory has never been challenged.
"Another criterion calls for discrimination in the use of force, that is, the protection of non-combatants. No guarantees in this area have been offered, and the evidence suggests that Iraqi civilians and civil society will suffer. As well, the United States refuses to rule out the use of nuclear weapons, a gesture which raises yet another spectre.
"Another criterion calls for a reasonable chance of success. The 1991 war may have succeeded in a military sense but did not produce a more peaceful or more stable Middle East, nor did it end the Iraqi violations of the UN resolutions, and I believe the present action has no better prospects for long-term peaceful resolution.
"I appreciate that the Canadian contribution is minimal, but I am nonetheless gravely concerned that the lives of our military personnel are being put at risk in an unjustifiable action.
"I find it impossible to see how long-term peace building and the empowering of the Iraqi people to improve their own circumstances are being served by this exercise.
"I want to associate myself with the concerns expressed by the World Council of Churches in this regard, and to assure all involved, beginning with our military personnel and including all other potential victims, of my prayers for their safety.
"And finally, I urge members of the Anglican Church of Canada to continue in their prayers for a just and peaceable outcome in this tense situation".
Michael G. Peers, Archbishop and Primate, Anglican Church of Canada
- 30 -
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources: 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, Editor, Print Resources: 416-924-9199 ext. 256
Subjects
Iraq
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Just war doctrine - Anglican Church of Canada
Persian Gulf War, 1991 - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Persian Gulf War, 1991 - Religious aspects - World Council of Churches
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Middle East
Canada - Armed Forces - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Less detail

Activist receives peace award

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34521
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 May
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 May
Volume
133
Issue
5
Page
14
Notes
The Rev. Bill Baldwin, a retired priest from Ottawa who has been working for peace in the Middle East, recently received the outstanding contribution award presented annually by the National Council on Canada-Arab Relations.
Subjects
Baldwin, William W. (William Warren), 1930-
Christian Peacemaker Teams - Palestine
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

[A Day of Prayer for Peace in the Middle East]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1842
Date
1991 January 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1991 January 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
URGENT ANNOUNCEMENT -- ATTENTION: DIOCESAN BISHOP OF DESIGNATE
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1991
1500 EST
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Church leaders, including Archbishop Michael Peers, have this afternoon released the following statement:
"We, as leaders of the Christian churches in Canada, call on our people to turn to God in prayer for a just and peaceful resolution to the Gulf Crisis by means other than war. We therefore urge our congregations and parishes to devote Sunday January 13th as a day of prayer for peace in the Middle East."
The statement is endorsed by leaders of the Anglican, Evangelical Lutheran, Presbyterian and United Churches, the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, and the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada. It is the first time all six of these bodies have come together in a joint statement.
If possible, you may wish to contact local radio and television stations and ask for their help in letting people know. A possible wording for a Public Service Announcement follows:
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
Leaders of Catholic, Protestant and Evangelical Churches in Canada have designated this Sunday a day of prayer for peace in the Middle East. People in all congregations and parishes are asked to turn to God in prayer for a just and peaceful resolution to the Gulf Crisis.
Subjects
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - Christianity
Persian Gulf War, 1991 - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Persian Gulf War, 1991 - Public opinion - Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Religious aspects
Special Sundays
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Affirmation of Resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council Relating to Conflict in the Middle East

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8283
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
Affirm the following resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council relating to conflict in the Middle East, numbered F1, F2, and F3 below:
F.1. Israel/Palestine.
This Anglican Consultative Council notes with increasing concern the continuing instability and violence in Israel/Palestine and the resulting economic and social disadvantage in vulnerable groups and communities, as well as the widespread destruction, fear, injury and loss of life in the area;
a) believes that the best way to achieve longer-term security and a lasting basis for peace is for each side to recognize the legitimate aspirations, rights and needs of the other;
b) condemns all violence against civilians;
c) while recognising the legitimate right to its own defence, believes that the present conduct of the State of Israel has raised the level of threat to Palestinians and thus escalated the violence, with its consequent threat to the security of all families and individuals within the State of Israel;
d) calls upon the Israeli Government and the Palestinian Authority, as well as individual politicians, religious groups and community leaders, to find a way of breaking the spiral of revenge violence by entering into a new joint formal process of negotiation, based on international, religious and humane values of truth, forgiveness and reconciliation, in order to move towards genuine peace, justice and stability in the area;
e) calls upon the Israeli Government to implement UN resolutions 242, 338 and 194; and supports resolution V.20 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference;
f) urges the member churches of the Anglican Communion and associated agencies to find new ways of supporting collaborative projects between Israeli and Palestinian, Jewish, Muslim and Christian individuals and groups;
g) assures the people of Israel/Palestine of its prayers for peace; that its prayers will be offered in the name of God who calls us all to a greater love for each other, our neighbours, those who are strangers to us and our enemies.
F.2. Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council:
1. Welcomes the proposed return of UN Weapons Inspectors to Iraq;
2. Calls on the government of Iraq to comply fully with UN resolution 687;
3. Believes that, on present evidence, military action against Iraq is not morally justified;
4. Calls, subject to reports from UN Weapons Inspectors, for sanctions, except for materials that could be used for Weapons of mass destruction, to be lifted.
F.3. Solidarity with ECUSA Position on Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council affirms its solidarity with the position taken by the Episcopal Church, USA, in June 2002, in opposing unilateral military action against Iraq by the United States, and with the view expressed by the Presiding Bishop in his statement of 6 September 2002, that:
1. war holds the prospect of destabilizing the Middle East and we will all be better served to see our national energies and resources expended in resolving the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, such that Israel finds security and peace with its neighbours and Palestinians achieve statehood;
2. military action would surely inflame the passions of millions, particularly in the Arab world, setting in motion cycles of violence and retaliation, further straining tenuous relationships that exist between the United States and other nations;
3. the United States has the opportunity to express leadership in the world by forging a foreign policy that seeks to reconcile and heal the world's divisions and reflect its values and ideals by focusing upon issues of poverty, disease and despair, not only within the US but throughout the global community of which it is a part. CARRIED #34-11-02
Notes
Note re F2.2 It was noted that there has been a United Nations' resolution subsequent to 687.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (12th : 2002 : Hong Kong, China) - Resolutions
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - Iraq
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Iraq War, 2003 - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
United States - Foreign relations - Iraq
United States - Foreign relations - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Less detail

Amid Palestinians' despair, one sees signs of hope

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34298
Author
Baldwin, William W. (William Warren), 1930-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 February
Author
Baldwin, William W. (William Warren), 1930-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 February
Volume
133
Issue
2
Page
10
Notes
The Rev. Bill Baldwin is a member of the Christian Peacemakers Team in Palestine.
Subjects
Christian Peacemaker Teams - Palestine
Palestinian Arabs - Israel
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Middle East
Less detail

Anglican Primate urges alternatives to armed intervention

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7231
Date
1998 December 23
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 December 23
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(TORONTO -- Dec. 23 [1998]) The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada says he cannot support armed intervention against Iraq and has urged the Canadian government to seek alternatives to military strikes.
Specifically, Archbishop Michael Peers said in a statement that Ottawa should use its position on the United Nations Security Council to press for the development of international conventions on sanctions similar to the Geneva Convention on war.
Such conventions, he argues, would ensure that sanctions are applied consistently and that they do not harm innocent people, as frequently happens now.
Archbishop Peers also proposed that the International Criminal Court serve as an alternative to military strikes. "The court is a potential force for peace in that it would uphold the rule of law over that of military might," he said.
The full text of Archbishop Peers' statement follows.
Statement on Iraq
By Archbishop Michael Peers
Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada
Once again, Iraq has been the target of western military force. The decision of the United States of America and Britain to join in an attack on Iraq has also found acceptance from the Prime Minister of Canada. And although the bombing has stopped, its resumption is an ever-present threat.
The intransigence of the Iraqi leadership in refusing to allow United States weapons inspectors to complete their mandate is of deep concern. Saddam Hussein's defiance of the international community is detestable. But military intervention is no solution. It promises to lead Iraq into still greater intractability.
For nearly eight years now, the people of Iraq have suffered under sanctions that have caused hardship and tragedy. Neither sanctions nor military action have managed to bring a more just and peaceable society in Iraq. I concur with Ernie Regehr of "Project Ploughshares", a peace and disarmament organization sponsored by the Canadian Council of Churches.
He says that "the present sanctions and military attacks betray and weaken Iraqi society and strengthen the regime."
Experienced soldiers understand that military action is a last resort, and I do not believe that this situation calls for that. If we seek peace, if we seek to unseat governments which wage terrorism and intimidate both their own citizens and other nations, we need to find alternatives which are by nature peace-building rather than death-dealing. I want to suggest two areas of exploration.
First, I urge our government to use its position on the Security Council of the United Nations to press for the development of international conventions on sanctions that parallel the 1949 Geneva conventions on the conduct of war. Sanctions have been imposed on a number of countries in the past, but have been carried out with considerable inconsistency. In the sanctions imposed on Iraq, it is the most vulnerable of citizens who have been hurt -- especially the children, many thousands of whom have died from malnutrition and disease. When the Canadian government applied sanctions against South Africa in the darkest days of apartheid, it took care to consider methods that would cause the least amount of pain to the oppressed, and be most effective against those who were oppressors. Our recent history, then, offers us models on which to reflect. An international commitment to the scope and employment of sanctions, as well as the minimization of the pain of civilians could provide a way forward when dealing with outlaw leaders.
I also propose an examination as to how the International Criminal Court might serve as an alternative to military intervention. Although the Court's ratification process may take another year, its mandate will include dealing with matters referred to it by the United Nations Security Council. The Court is a potential force for peace in that it would uphold the rule of law over that of military might. American support for the Court, should it ever appear, would be significant.
I cannot support this latest attack, nor can I conceive of supporting the use of military force in similar circumstances in the future. I urge the Canadian government to use every means at their disposal to work for other solutions. In these days when Muslims mark the holy season of Ramadan, and Christians prepare for Christmas, I urge Anglicans throughout this country to pray for those on all sides in this conflict. May God inspire us with the song of peace sung by angels at the birth of Christ. May God also increase in us the vision of compassion and justice that we celebrate in the Christmas season.
- 30 -
Subjects
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Middle East
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
International Criminal Court
Economic sanctions - Iraq
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

[Appeal to Jews and Arabs to Settle Differences]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5153
Date
1973 October 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1973 October 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Leaders of two Christian Churches in Canada today appealed to both Arabs and Jews to settle their differences by peace conference.
Most Reverend E.W. Scott, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Right Reverend N. Bruce McLeod, Moderator of the United Church of Canada have called upon their "Arab and Jewish brothers to condemn the inhumanity of war."
In a joint communique the church leaders say; "Some of us in the Christian community recognize the mixture of pride and fear which has fed the continuing crisis in the Middle East from both sides.
"We affirm, however, our belief that Israel has the right to live, and to live in peace."
"We declare also our concern for the right of the Palestinians and all people in the Middle East to live in peace."
"We call upon our Arab and Jewish brothers to condemn the inhumanity of war, and to urge upon their leaders an early peace conference which would satisfy the reasonable claims of the Palestinians and guarantee Israel her safety."
"We pray for the peace of Jerusalem."
-30 -
For more information contact:
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
Anglican Church of Canada
(416) 924-9192
or
Mr. Norman Vale
United Church of Canada
(416) 925-5931
Subjects
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
McLeod, Bruce (N. Bruce)
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - United Church of Canada
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Christianity
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Author
Graydon, Annette
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2006 May

Canadian Primate expresses condolences on death of Yasser Arafat

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8834
Date
2004 November 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2004 November 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, November 11, 2004 -- Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada has extended compassionate condolences to the people of Palestine on the death of their leader, Yasser Arafat. The Palestinian President, died in a hospital in France Thursday at the age of 75.
"President Arafat was a pivotal figure in the Middle East for more than a generation", the Anglican Primate said. "He is the only leader many younger Palestinians have ever known. President Arafat's people and family are in my thoughts today and in the face of an uncertain future, I urge all Anglicans to continue to pray for peace and stability in the Middle East".
- 30 -
For more information, please contact: Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Director of Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 306; scarriere@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Arafat, Yasser, 1929-2004
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Church carefully weighs divestment issue

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article32008
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2005 January
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2005 January
Volume
131
Issue
1
Page
9
Notes
Some denominations are reviewing their investment policies with companies that do business with Israel. Cynthia Patterson clarified that the Anglican Peace and Justice Network had not called for divestment.
Subjects
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Disinvestment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hutchison, Andrew S. (Andrew Sandford), 1938-
Anglican Peace and Justice Network
Patterson, Cynthia, 1955-
Disinvestment - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Less detail

53 records – page 1 of 6.