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22 days of action for justice, healing

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40154
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 June
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 June
Volume
141
Issue
6
Page
10-11
Notes
"Anglicans across Canada are being called to demonstrate -- in the 22 days following the closing event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission -- that this ending is only the beginning of healing and reconciliation with Canada's Indigenous people. Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald have issued a call to the whole church today to participate in #22days, a campaign that will stretch from the start of the closing of TRC event in Ottawa on May 31 [2015] to National Aboriginal Day on June 21 [2015]. 22days was first conceived of by a group of cathedral deans from cities in which a national TRC event was held and was 'heartily endorsed' by the House of Bishops" (p. 10). "The General Synod communications team has created a web page -- 22days.ca -- that will offer resources, including 22 videos featuring former residential school students and staff describing their experiences in the schools. The videos are not the typical 30-second sound bytes people are used to viewing on television, they are about 15 to 20 minutes each, in order to tell the stories in a more whole and sensitive way, said Anglican Video senior producer Lisa Barry. One video will be added daily to the website during the 22-day period and each will be accompanied by a prayer, written by various people in the church" (p. 11).
Subjects
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indian residential schools - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Truth and Reconciliation Commission
22 Days Campaign
Deans, Cathedral and collegiate - Anglican Church of Canada
Parker, Shane A.D. (Shane Alexander Donaldson), 1958-
Elliott, Peter G. (Peter Gordon), 1954-
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Barry, Lisa
Web sites - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

ACIP calls for national summit: Cite pastoral concern for unpaid aboriginal clergy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36214
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 September
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 September
Volume
134
Issue
7
Page
6
Notes
"The Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) has proposed a national summit to discuss the issue of non-stipendiary, or unpaid, aboriginal clergy, most of whom are serving in large native communities across Canada. 'Nobody wants the problem put on their laps, not because they're not concerned, but because there are no resources,' said Mark MacDonald, the national Anglican indigenous bishop. 'What we're suggesting is a cross-church consultation, a summit where a whole group of people (can discuss) what can only be described as a moral issue for all of us. There's no entity to solve it effectively'," Archbishop Caleb Lawrence said "that the house of bishops had been 'trying to address' the need but that it was having difficulty coming to an agreement with ACIP. He noted that talks between the two sides have bogged down".
Subjects
Nonstipendiary clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Salaries
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Lawrence, Caleb (Caleb James), 1941-
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Less detail

Across Canada: Church responds to suicide pandemic

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38117
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 October
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 October
Volume
138
Issue
8
Page
5
Notes
"Suicide is 'not an easy tea and cookie conversation', Cynthia Patterson told a gathering of about 200 indigenous Anglicans at the Seventh Sacred Circle. However, she added, the pandemic among aboriginal people can no longer be ignored. In Nunavut, the suicide rate is 15 times the national average -- which is 15 per 100,000 people. In the Arctic, it is 11 times the national average. Families need to talk about suicide instead of sweeping it under the rug, said Patterson. 'We have kids, aunts and uncles who die and the pain is so great .. We don't talk about them .. It's as if they've disappeared'. For its part, the Anglican church has moved oversight of the suicide-prevention program to the indigenous ministry department, noted Patterson. The aim is to 'extend its reach into every nook and cranny', said National Indigenous Anglican Bishops Mark MacDonald. Suicide prevention will now be part of training for clergy, catechists and other church workers, he told the Journal". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Suicide - Prevention
Suicide - Canada - Statistics
Suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Suicidal behavior
Patterson, Cynthia
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Anglican Church of Canada. Indigenous Ministries
Less detail

An 'Appalling, Inhumane' Experiment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38041
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 September
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 September
Volume
139
Issue
7
Page
1
Notes
"On July 16 [2013], several publications carried a Canadian Press (CP) story about Ian Mosby, a historian from the University of Guelph, who stumbled on a little-known fact in the course of his research on the history of food in Canada. In the 1940s, the Canadian government subjected aboriginal children from six Indian residential schools to nutrition experiments that included withholding food and basic dental care, Mosby told CP's Bob Weber. And yet, Mosby noted, little was written about this. 'A May 2000 article in the "Anglican Journal" about some of them was the only reference Mosby could find', reported CP. Reacting to the news, the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, and National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald issued a joint statement describing the tests conducted on aboriginal children as 'appalling'. Using the schools as laboratories and children as subjects of experiments, they said, is 'so inhumane'". The news prompted calls from various groups, including the church, for a federal investigation into the matter".
Subjects
Indian residential schools - Canada
Native children - Abuse of - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Mosby, Ian, 1980-
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Less detail

'A new vision of what the church can be': Canon 22 established self-determining national indigenous ministry

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36231
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 June
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 June
Volume
135
Issue
6
Page
1, 6
Notes
"In what was described as an 'historic moment', the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada has approved the introduction of a new canon (church law) that firmly established a self-determining national indigenous ministry within the church. The resolution to establish Canon 22 was passed at General Synod 2010 in Halifax on June 9 [2010]". "Bishop [Mark] MacDonald said one of the key issues national native ministry will address is that of non-stipendiary priests. .... He also urged the church to address the needs of aboriginal people in urban areas. .... One of the goals of native Canadian Anglicans would also be to 'introduce Canada to Canada', said Bishop MacDonald. For instance, he said, 'its time we understand how important the North is to Canada, how important it is to our identity and our future'. He noted that the North is suffering climate change 'like no other place on earth'." "Bishop Lydia Mamakwa, the first bishop of the newly created area mission in Northern Ontario, also addressed the synod, recalling that aboriginal clergy were first ordained in the church about 40 years ago".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (39th : 2010 : Halifax, N.S.)
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Constitution - Canon XXII
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Indigenous Ministries
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Mamakwa, Lydia, 1957-
Beardy, Larry
Nonstipendiary clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada, Northern
Less detail

Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report: Indigenous Ministries: In the footsteps of Blind Moses and Blind Paul

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38398
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Volume
139
Issue
5
Page
insert 5
Notes
"In the early 20th century, the native lay catechists Blind Moses and Blind Paul brought the gospel to indigenous peoples living near the Arctic Circle. Now the Anglican Church of Canada is launching an initiative to train contemporary catechists who will likewise school their indigenous brothers and sisters in the basics of the Christian faith. 'Historically, most of the growth and much of the creativity in indigenous churches has been from catechists', says Bishop Mark MacDonald, the church's national indigenous bishop. 'Easily deployable, close to the people, the catechists were able to apply the gospel to the needs of the people in a way that stressed its compatibility with the values of traditional indigenous life'. Spearheading the current project, which was presented at the February [2013] meeting of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) in Calgary, is the Rev. Canon Ginny Doctor, indigenous ministries co-ordinator and a Mohawk from the Six Nations in New York state. 'Jesus sent people out two by two to preach and teach', says Doctor, who spent many years helping restore spirituality to aboriginal people living in urban settings. 'We're following an old model'."
Eight page insert (1-8) with May 2013 issue of Anglican Journal. Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report. Insert produced by Resources for Mission Dept.
Subjects
Native catechists - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Doctor, Ginny (Virginia Carol), 1950-
Less detail

Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report: Indigenous Ministries: Water: the Creator's sacred gift

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38395
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Volume
139
Issue
5
Page
insert 4
Notes
"For most of us, a safe water supply is as Canadian as medicare and the cultural mosaic. But for many indigenous people, clean water is a far cry from reality. Across Canada, however, Anglicans are beginning to address this issue through an initiative loosely formed by Bishop Mark MacDonald, national indigenous bishop of the Anglican Church of Canada. MacDonald became aware of an uptick in church interest in 2011 when he raised the water question as keynote speaker at the diocese of Toronto's annual social-justice conference". "Now the 'water group' meets every couple of months at Trinity Church in Aurora, north of Toronto, in sessions that typically attract about 20 people. 'Right now it's mainly a spiritual movement, but in a couple of years it may become more of an institution', he says. 'We're picking up people quickly, and a group is forming in Toronto to help the remote northern Ontario community of Pikangikum with water and other issues. The advocates' ultimate aim is to get the federal government to live up to its legal obligations and spend the estimated $12 billion needed for the infrastructure improvements that will guarantee clean water to indigenous communities". "Gaining momentum, the group may soon officially assume the name 'Pimatisiwan Nipi' (Oji-Cree for 'living water'), and it will likely hold a national meeting at some point. 'But for now, it's a community of spiritual concern that stays together in conversation', says MacDonald".
Eight page insert (1-8) with May 2013 issue of Anglican Journal. Anglican Church of Canada Ministry Report. Insert produced by Resources for Mission Dept.
Subjects
Water-supply - Canada
Water quality management - Canada
Water - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Drinking water - Canada
Pikangikum First Nation (Ont.)
Ojibwa Indians - Ontario - Pikangikum
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Indigenous peoples in conservation of natural resources - Canada
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Pimatisiwin Nipi (Living Waters)
Less detail

Anglicans celebrate 175th anniversary of Devon Mission

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39118
Author
Courey, Allison
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 May
Author
Courey, Allison
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 May
Volume
142
Issue
5
Page
3
Notes
"During the first weekend of April [2016] on Opaskwayak Cree Nation (OCN), Anglicans and others from across the country gathered to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the Devon Mission. A colourful procession of Cree dancers, led by a crucifer and a pole covered with eagle feathers, marked the importance of the area as a gathering place for Cree and settler people alike. In many ways, the land -- now divided between the town of The Pas and OCN -- exemplifies the breadth of Indigenous-settler relations in Canada". Henry Budd, a young Cree convert, returned to his home in the north in 1840 "to open the mission, where he spent his life teaching the gospel to his people in their native Cree. In 1853, the first bishop of Rupert's Land, David Anderson, ordained Henry Budd, making him the first Indigenous cleric in what is now Canada. The Henry Budd College for Ministry, opened in his honour in 1980, trains Indigenous catechists and spiritual leaders to this day". "For some, the celebration of Indigenous expressions of Christianity marked a return to the days of their ancestors, when the gospel was expressed through Cree culture and language". "National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald affirmed a sense of hope for the future. 'We do not have two cultures', he said. 'We are Indigenous Christians'".
Author is "chaplain at St. John's College, Winnipeg, and editor of 'Rupert's Land News'".
Subjects
Devon Mission (The Pas, Man.) - History
Native peoples - Canada - Missions - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Missions - Manitoba - History
Budd, Henry, 1812-1875
Cree Indians - Manitoba
Christianity and culture - Anglican Church of Canada
Native spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Less detail

Anglicans must 'face the lion'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article40108
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 May
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 May
Volume
141
Issue
5
Page
1, 10
Notes
From 23 to 27 February 2015, an Anglican "eco-bishops conference" was held in Cape Town, South Africa. National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald and Bishop Jane Alexander of Edmonton, joined 15 other bishops at the conference which "was hosted by the Anglican Communion Environmental Network, which is dedicated to fighting climate change. On Good Friday, April 3 [2015], the bishops -- representing 15 provinces of the Anglican Communion -- issued a declaration urging Anglican worldwide to recognize climate change as 'the most urgent moral issue of our day'" (p. 10). Bishop Jane Alexander "admitted to being particularly struck by the difficulties illustrated in a story told by the bishop of Fiji, Apimeleki Qiliho, whose diocese includes a number of small islands that, it is predicted, will be submerged within a generation". "But there were challenges inherent in such a diverse meeting as well. Much work still needed to be done to bring everyone onto the same page, according to Ncumisa Ukeweva Magadla, one of the conference organizers. 'I felt like they were coming from two different worlds, the Indigenous churches and the Western churches', she said. 'I really did think that some of the bishops -- especially the ones coming from the Western side -- did not understand the issues that were going on in those Indigenous countries like Fiji, like the Philippines, where they face water literally at their doorstep'" (p. 10).
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion - Congresses
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion Environmental Network
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Alexander, Jane, 1959-
Qiliho, Apimeleki Nadoki (Api)
Magadla, Ncumisa Ukeweva
Climatic changes - Fiji
Indigenous peoples in conservation of natural resources
Less detail

Approval, concern for Indigenous church plan

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41197
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 September
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2017 September
Volume
143
Issue
7
Page
7
Notes
"A series of reports on the planned self-determining Canadian Indigenous Anglican church presented to Council of General Synod (CoGS) June 24 [2017] met with a mixture of approval and concern. While some CoGS member said they were happy to see concrete steps being taken toward a self-determining Indigenous Anglican body, others expressed curiosity about how it would relate with the Anglican Church of Canada and concern about how much it would cost. Canon Ginny Doctor, the Anglican Church of Canada's Indigenous ministries co-ordinator had presented two reports to CoGS, including a 2018 budget that asks for $1.2 million in funding for Indigenous ministry out of the national office, plus another $2.9 million to fund four regional offices it envisages. Among the budget's largest items are $450,000 for Sacred Circle and $1.2 million in salaries for staff at the four regional offices".
Subjects
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Indigenous Ministries
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Structure
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of General Synod
Doctor, Ginny (Virginia Carol), 1950-
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Less detail

90 records – page 1 of 9.