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[Challenge to Canadian Labour Movement]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5152
Date
1973 September 17
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1973 September 17
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
The Canadian labour movement was challenged to be "true to its own story and not to lose its soul" by the Most Rev. E.W. Scott, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, speaking at the opening of the convention of the Brotherhood of Railway and General Workers in Toronto, today.
"Is the labour movement concerned about groups who are powerless, or is its primary interest to increase its own power?" Archbishop Scott asked. Since unions grew from experiences of injustice and a sense of powerlessness, Archbishop Scott wondered what part they were now playing in the struggle of the "powerless peoples" to share in the economic benefits and decision making of an increasingly inter-locking world economy. He said he has already asked the same question of representatives of Canadian business, federal and provincial governments and within the church.
"How many Indians and Eskimo people have been welcomed into organized labour and how hard does labour work to equalize the benefits within its own ranks?" he asked. Archbishop Scott said "many people rightly criticize the church as it so often fails to be true to its own principles, the same may well be true of the labour movement."
"One of the things that people who have been oppressed learn all too well is how to oppress when they gain power," said Archbishop Scott. He appealed to the convention to "rise above that very real temptation and be true to your own story."
- 30 -
For more information contact:
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
924-9192
Subjects
Church and labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and labor - Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Power (Social sciences)
Power (Christian theology) - Anglican Church of Canada
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Racism - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Collective Bargaining

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article478
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1920 January
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1920 January
Issue
32
Page
1-19 p.
Notes
"The purpose of the Bulletin is to present to its readers various, and sometimes differing, view-points on social subjects. Its object is, therefore, information and not propaganda. The Editorial Board does not necessarily endorse all, or any, of the opinions expressed in its publications". -- p. 3.
Contents: [List of] Publications of the Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada -- Collective Bargaining -- Notes and Views of the Council's Work.
"Does collective bargaining mean the recognition by the masters of the rights of their employees to present their complaints or demands collectively, or does it mean that Labour, as such, shall present its demands to Capital, as such, and force the issue between master and man by the aid of a general strike ? In a word, the conception of the One Big Union lies at the root of the whole question of collective bargaining. Does collective bargaining imply the O.B.U. or does it not ?" (pp. 3-4). "We have endeavoured, imperfectly though it may be, to present to our readers the problems which lie before the industrial order of our country, of the world. We have shown the dangers which have to be discerned in the new and revolutionary spirit abroad in the ranks of labour, a spirit which became vocal and insistent in the recent troubles in Winnipeg. We have shown that such a spirit is entirely alien to the best traditions of the labour movement as expressed in organized trade unionism, and lastly we have indicated the new orientation of the whole question of the relations between capital and labour" (p. 14). "For too long has the atmosphere been one of distrust and antipathy between labour and capital. And what has been the outcome ? I.W.W-ism, Bolshevism, and now the O.B.U. Labour has far too long been regarded as one of the costs of production. The wages of labour have been regarded in the same light as the cost of raw material and the expenses of the productive process. We cannot afford to take that view any more. The wages of the worker must now be regarded as coming from the rewards of industry, not the expenses of industry. In other words, labour must be a partner in the productive process and share in the profits" (pp. 14-15).
Collection Bargaining divided into sub-sections: Trade Unionism -- Trade Consciousness and Class Consciousness -- Winnipeg -- After Winnipeg ? -- The New Unionism and the Old -- The Issue to be Faced -- Trade Union Policy -- Conclusion.
Notes and Views of the Council's Work divided into sub-sections: [Council for Social Service] -- Diocesan Allotments for 1920 -- Department to Promote the Welcome and Welfare of the Newcomers.
"At the last meeting of the Executive Committee it was decided that, beginning with the January issue of 1920, the Bulletin should be enlarged by four pages, two of which should serve as a medium to connect the Executive Committee with its constituency and should be at the disposal of the General Secretary, the remaining two to be devoted to brief items of general Social Service news (p. 16)". -- Notes and Views of the Council's Work.
Subjects
Labor - Canada
Church and labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and industry - Anglican Church of Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
General Strike, Winnipeg, Man., 1919
Capitalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Collective bargaining - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service. Bulletin
Less detail

Industrial Unrest

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article454
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 December
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 December
Issue
7
Page
1-16 p.
Notes
"Everyone is more or less aware that the present time is one of industrial unrest, to some the realization of the fact has come more acutely than to others. .... Such an impression is, in every way, a correct one. Something is wrong with the relations between capital and labour, and the opinion of the most acute observers is unanimous that things are going to be infinitely worse before they are better (p. 2)". "It is curious, or rather it is not at all curious, it is inevitable, how the same note is being sounded from every quarter. English Bishop and Canadian statesman, they say the same, let us talk no longer of class hatred, of aristocrat and proletarian, of capital and labour, let us talk of human beings, of men and women made in the express image of God. In that determination, lead by the Holy Spirit of God, lies the economic and spiritual salvation of the world (p. 12)".
Contents divided into sub-sections: Some Fundamental Concepts -- The Concept of Profits -- The Industrial Struggle -- The Employer's Answer -- An Examination of the Two Arguments -- The Rational Basis for the Labour Movement -- The Status of Labour -- The Position of the Church -- Industrial Peace -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Appendix: Excerpts from the Lambeth Encyclical and From the Reports of the Joint Commission on Capital and Labour of the Protestant Evangelical Church in the United States of America.
Subjects
Church and industry - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and labor - Canada
Church and labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Strikes and lockouts - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Program Committee Report

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4291
Date
1974 May 15-17
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1974 May 15-17
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Brown
Seconder
Broadwell
Text
That this National Executive Council supports the United Farm Workers boycott of grapes and iceberg head lettuce from California and Arizona until such time as free, secret ballot elections for field workers are held, and calls upon Anglicans to refrain from the purchase or consumption of non-United Farm Worker table grapes and head lettuce from California and Arizona in any of its functions or institutions until such time as free, secret ballot elections have been held.
After much discussion the motion was CARRIED.
Subjects
United Farm Workers
Boycotts - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - United States
Christianity and agriculture - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
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PWRDF staff say yes to union

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35298
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 March
Volume
134
Issue
3
Page
11
Notes
By a vote of 13 to 4, staff at the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund voted on 8 February 2008 to join the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Subjects
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Employees
Anglican Church of Canada - Employees
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of the Council for Social Service - Collective Bargaining

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5995
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Dr. J.C. Flanagan
Seconder
Rev. S.L. Pollard
Text
That this General Synod endorses the principle of free collective bargaining and expresses the approval of the findings of Mr. Justice Rand of the Supreme Court of Canada in connection with the strike of the United Automobile Workers (C.I.O.) at the Ford Plant in Windsor, Ontario, this year, as being in agreement with democratic practise, giving security to the workers and helping to bring the employers and employees into a closer relationship. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Collective labor agreements - Canada
Collective labor agreements - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Strikes and lockouts - Canada
Church and industry - Canada
Labor laws and legislation - Canada
Less detail

Report of the Council for Social Service - Industrial Disputes

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5994
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Mr. R.J. Lecky
Seconder
Prof. E.A. Dale
Text
The members of General Synod have viewed with regret the outbreak of industrial disturbances during the closing months of the war and thereafter. These have retarded the country's conversion from war-time to peace-time economy and the establishment of adequate living conditions for all classes; have contributed in some degree to inflation; and have adversely affected Canada's contribution to the needs of Great Britain and the world.
The Synod affirms that the essential factor needed today is a greater appreciation by all parties - Capital and Management, Labour and the Community - of the basic financial and cultural needs of all concerned in industry, which, in turn, are dependent upon a fair distribution of the fruits of joint effort. The Synod views with deep concern the abuse by both parties of organizational powers to interpret, and to act under, present legislation for the settlement of disputes; urges them to consider their action in the light of the welfare of the whole country and hopes that a development of confidence, good will and a sense of the duty of service to world-wide need will secure a greater measure of justice for all parties and consequent industrial peace.
The resolution was then put to vote and was CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Strikes and lockouts - Canada
Strikes and lockouts - Religious aspects - Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and industry - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Economic conditions - 1945-1971
Economics - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

REPORT OF THE PENSION COMMITTEE #010-08-10-03 : LAY RETIREMENT PLAN (LRP) REGULATIONS

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9666
Date
2010 March 11-14
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 07-03-10
Date
2010 March 11-14
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 07-03-10
Mover
Chancellor Ronald Stevenson
Seconder
Archdeacon Harry Huskins
Text
That the Council of General Synod approve amendments to Regulation 2.1 effective January 1, 2009
Bold indicates addition [In electronic database bold indicated by pointed brackets i.e. ]
Section 1 of Regulation 2 (“Eligibility & Membership”) be amended to read as follows:
2.1. All lay employees of a Participating Employer shall be Members except as provided under sections 2 and 3 of this Regulation.
CARRIED #07-03-10
Subjects
Pensions - Anglican Church of Canada - Regulations
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Employees
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Employees
Less detail

The Social Concern of Canon Scott

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39363
Author
Pulker, Edward A. (Edward Alfred), 1916-2000
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1980 October
Author
Pulker, Edward A. (Edward Alfred), 1916-2000
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1980 October
Volume
22
Issue
[2]
Page
1-16
Notes
"Frederick George Scott is remembered primarily as 'the beloved padre' of the Great War of 1914-18 and as a poet and hymn-writer. In a 1938 article in 'Maclean's' Hubert Evans described him as having a magic which overcame barriers of hostility and indifference toward religion and extolled his courage and concern as qualities which arouse the love and admiration of the men whom he served as senior chaplain of the First Canadian Division. That Scott showed the same courage and concern in the case of certain social issues has been for the most part ignored. Whereas many men might have been unwilling to dissipate a well-earned reputation in the spousal of unpopular causes, Scott spoke and acted for what he believed to be truth and justice with the same indifference to his personal welfare that he had shown on the battle-fields of France. Scott's first attempt at intervention in a social crisis came less than a year after the end of the Great War when in June 1919 he travelled to Winnipeg in the hope of contributing to mediation in the General Strike" (p. 1). "Canon Scott played his most prominent role as the defender of the underdog when in 1923 he took the part of steelworkers in their strike against the British Empire Steel Corporation of Nova Scotia (BESCO)" (p. 3). At the 1931 General Synod "he made his presence felt during the debate on unemployment, a subject which naturally took a great deal of time for discussion since this was the first General Synod since the onset of the Great Depression" (p. 11). "In 1933 Scott became embroiled in the controversial issue of the conditions in the federal penitentiary at Kingston, where serious riots had taken place in October 1932" (p. 12). "What was probably Archdeacon Scott's last public controversy also took place in 1934. In January of that year he expressed strong disapproval of resolutions emanating from a large Montreal church. These resolutions sought to restrict the role of the pulpit to the spiritual direction of the people, claiming that when the pulpit inveighed against social and economic wrongs, it was going beyond the spiritual realm into the political. To Scott 'to accept such a position was intolerable'" (p. 13).
Article divided into sections: 1. The Winnipeg General Strike -- 2. The BESCO Strike of 1923 -- 3. The 1931 General Synod -- 4. The 1932 Riots at Kingston Penitentiary -- 5. On Church Involvement in Social Issues.
Subjects
Scott, Frederick George, 1861-1944
Church and social problems - Anglican Canada of Canada - 20th century
Labor movement - Canada
Labor unions and Christianity - Anglican Church of Canada
Strikes and lockouts - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Unemployment - Canada
Unemployment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prison reform - Canada
Prisoners - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
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9 records – page 1 of 1.