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Aboriginal Day of Prayer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1329
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-87
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-87
Mover
Bishop Morgan
Seconder
Archbishop Hambidge
Prologue
Bishop Morgan drew attention to the document "The New Covenant" stating that appeals have been received from native people that the Sunday before the First Minister's Conference be designated a Day of Prayer.
Text
That this House of Bishops respond to the request of Native leaders for the Churches to name a Day of Prayer to precede the final First Ministers' Conference to be held on March 26-27, by designating Sunday, March 22, as a Day of Prayer for Aboriginal Peoples:
And that we commend the document entitled "A New Covenant" prepared as a Pastoral Statement by leaders of the Christian Churches to be used as a focus for this Day of Prayer. CARRIED
Subjects
National Aboriginal Day of Prayer (March 22)
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Indigenous peoples - Canada
First Ministers' Conference on Aboriginal Constitutional Matters (1987 : Ottawa, Ont.)
A New Covenant
Special Sundays
Less detail

Guidelines on Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6860
Date
1981 May 4-8
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1981 May 4-8
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop Goodman
Seconder
Bishop Peers
Prologue
Bishop Goodman introduced the Report of the ad hoc Committee on "Guidelines on Bishops." Bishop Peers and Bishop K. Clarke assisted with the presentation. The members of the House made a number of useful comments for the consideration of the ad hoc Committee.
Text
That the Report on "Guidelines and Bishops" be received. CARRIED
Notes
During discussion it was agreed that more uniform national policy is needed in the election of Bishops and in the Ordering of a Bishop to assist the Diocesan.
Concern was expressed regarding the retention of the title of Archbishop after retirement.
Moved by Archbishop Garnsworthy, seconded by Bishop Ragg,
That Section V(7) on "Assistant to the Bishop" be removed. CARRIED
Moved by Bishop Nock, seconded by Bishop Goodings,
That in Section V(6) "Assistant Bishop" the word "regular" be omitted. CARRIED
Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on "Guidelines on Bishops"
(See House of Bishops' Minutes, October 1980, p.16; November 1969, p.14 and Appendix B. pp.29/35)
Other Related Material
1. Hilchey letter to Goodman - April 16/80
2. Goodman Report of House of Bishops - June/80 which lists all relevant passages in House of Bishops' Minutes
3. "Report on a Constitution for the House of Bishops" (Goodman) December, 1972 (recommending that there be neither constitution nor canon in this connection). This was a complete review of developments up to that time, including certain other recommendations as well as the one noted above. It included as well a 1971 report on the subject, and correspondence with Chancellor Ryan, Bishop Howe, Rev. Fr. Coleman (recommended by Bishop Howe as having expertise on the subject), and Dr. Conrad Swan, York Herald of Arms.
Further Comments
In order to assist any subsequent research in this area it is important to keep an up-to-date list of earlier studies and reports - somehow or other the comprehensive report of 1972 seemed to have been overlooked by myself (who made it!) and other last Spring when we started back at "square one". In that report two objectives were set out as follows:
A. To maintain the independence and integrity of the House of Bishops so that it may fulfill its responsibility to Christ and His Church.
B. To enable the House of Bishops to relate effectively with the General Synod when it is in session and with the National Executive Council and other National Committees. (Section IV - A of the report)
Section IV - B has certain other recommendations which might still be of some interest.
This report of 1972 taken with the subsequent listing of all references in the House of Bishops' Minutes of June 1980 might be regarded as a definitive document on the subject to date.
The Meeting of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Guidelines
Monday, March 23, 1981 (Calgary) - Bishops Clarke, Peers and Goodman
Notes
1. There are a great many other guidelines having to do with agreed policies in pastoral and administrative action (eg. mixed marriages, Christian Initiation, (agreed?!) etc., etc.). This present committee was not concerned with these but with the status and responsibility of the Episcopate and in particular with the document (on that subject Appendix B pp.29-35, House of Bishops' Minutes, November, 1969 - "Guidelines on Bishops".)
2. There is a developed conviction that it would be inadvisable to have either a Constitution for the House of Bishops or a Canon on the House of Bishops. This is perhaps the one clear conviction which has come out of successive studies and debates.
3. Originally (1961) the material numbered twenty (XX) sections, by 1969 the number of sections has been reduced to ten (X) but our study revealed that most if not all of the earlier material was still present in the revised text, having been collated, edited and rearranged.
4. In the time at our disposal we were able to deal with the first seven (VII) sections of the 1969 report. If the House wishes us to continue we must report on the last three sections at some later date.
5. Our work resulted in some considerable re-wording, renumbering, and the addition as well as the deletion of some material.
6. Certain Provincial and General Synod Canons must be reckoned with in regard to the Guidelines, to the best of our ability we attempted to do this.
Suggested Revision of Material in Appendix B - House of Bishops Minutes, November 1969, pp.29-35 - Guidelines on Bishops
Appendix B
Guidelines on Bishops
Note: The doctrine of episcopacy is contained in the Ordinal. What follows concerns episcope in practice.
1. The Anglican Church of Canada holds and teaches that from the Apostles' time there have been these Orders of Ministers in Christ's Church: Bishops, Priests (Presbyters) and Deacons; and no person shall be accounted or taken to be a lawful Bishop, Priest or Deacon in the Anglican Church of Canada, or permitted to execute any of the offices attached to the same, except such person be called, examined and admitted thereunto according to the Ordinal or has had episcopal consecration or ordination in some Church whose orders are recognized and accepted by the Anglican Church of Canada.
2. Before any person is consecrated to the episcopate, the Metropolitan of the Province must be satisfied that the person possesses the qualifications for the office. The Bishop-elect must be a Priest of not less than five years' standing, and thirty years of age; of good character, piety, learning; with a zeal for souls, prudence; sound in health of body and mind.
3. The Constitutive elements in the making of a Bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada are:
(1) in the ordering of a Diocesan, the prior consent of the Metropolitan to the arrangements for the election of said Bishop.
In the ordering of a Bishop to assist the Diocesan, the prior consent of the Metropolitan and the other Bishops of the Province to the arrangements for the election of said Bishop.
(2) election of the Synod or Electoral Body of the Diocese in accordance with the operative canon of the Ecclesiastical Province and Diocese concerned. Clerical and Lay Delegates vote separately, by ballot. Election shall require at least a majority of votes cast by the Clergy, and by the Laity.
(3) free acceptance by the person elected within a space of 14 days after his receiving notification of his election.
(4) ratification of the election by the Metropolitan and Bishops of the Province as prescribed in the Provincial Canons. (This ratification constitutes the Bishop-elect, after his Consecration, a member of the Provincial House of Bishops, the National House and the Order of Bishops within the General Synod.)
(5) consecration according to the form approved by General Synod, with the Metropolitan or some other Bishop delegated by him as the Chief Consecrator, assisted by at least two other Bishops exercising their offices in two Dioceses of the Province other than that of the Chief Consecrator. (In no circumstances shall there be less than three Bishops taking part in the Consecration of a Bishop.)
(6) registration of the Election and Consecration of the Bishop in the Registers of the Diocese, the Province and of General Synod.
4. (Note: since this section is a theological commentary we were concerned as to whether it belongs in the "Guidelines". We have left it in with some emendation of the ultimate paragraph. If it is decided to remove it, the following sections must be renumbered.)
The effects of Ordination, and its obligations, are permanent, in the same way that the effects and obligations of Baptism are permanent.
(1) The Bishop was made Deacon, and after his Consecration he still remains a servant. His Diaconate is extended and made more onerous, for he now becomes a servant of the servants of God.
(2) He was ordained Priest. He never ceases to be a Priest. Among his clergy, he is an equal in all respects as to his Priesthood. His obligations to preach the Gospel and to minister the Sacraments of Christ never cease.
(3) The unity of the ordained ministry lies in this common priesthood of the Gospel and Sacraments, and in the apostolate and mission of the whole Church to the world. Among the clergy and people of the Church, the Bishop is Chief Pastor.
5. Bishops are equal in regard to their consecration and office; they may differ in their jurisdiction. These differences in jurisdictions are described below.
(1) The Primate - a Bishop who is elected by General Synod and installed as Chief Pastor to the National Church, President of the House of Bishops, of the General Synod and of the Executive Council, with preeminence throughout the Church, but without territorial jurisdiction. The Primate bears the title of Archbishop.
(2) Metropolitan - a Bishop who has jurisdiction not only within his own Diocese but also a jurisdiction and preeminence throughout the ecclesiastical province as defined in the Canons of that Province. He bears the title of Archbishop.
(3) Diocesan - a Bishop who has jurisdiction and preeminence within a Diocese and may also be referred to as the Ordinary of that Diocese.
(4) Coadjutor - a Bishop elected to assist a Diocesan Bishop with right of succession on the death or resignation of that Diocesan.
(5) Suffragan - a person elected and consecrated to assist the Diocesan.
(6) Assistant Bishop - a Bishop already consecrated, appointed by the Diocesan and the Executive Council of a Diocese, and in receipt of regular Diocesan remuneration. Such appointment may be held together with the care of a parish or other ministry within the Diocese.
(7) Assistant to the Bishop - a Bishop already consecrated who is appointed by the Diocesan to assist him in his episcopal ministry, subject to any limitations inherent in Diocesan, Provincial or General Synod Canons.
NOTE: The following is a new section.
6. The Bishop's responsibilities within the Council of the Church.
(1) In the categories listed in Section V (above), the Primate, the Metropolitans, the Diocesans, the Coadjutors, Suffragans and assistant Bishops are members of the National and Provincial Houses of Bishops, and of the Order of Bishops within General Synod, with voice and vote implicit to each membership. The expenses incurred by attendance at meetings of these bodies are the responsibility of General or Provincial Synod as the case may be.
(2) Assistants to the Bishop, Bishops who have resigned and/or retired and who are in good standing are members of the National and Provincial Houses of Bishops with voice and vote. They are also members of the Order of Bishops within General Synod, but without vote. The expenses incurred by attendance at meetings of these bodies are the responsibility of the individual Bishop.
NOTE: Former VI becomes VII and is completely rewritten with close attention to its content but with a new form.
7. A Diocesan in relation to his Diocese.
(1) Inherent in his Diocesan jurisdiction the Diocesan Bishop has the following authority and responsibilities:
- to function as the chief liturgical officer.
- to preside at the Eucharist.
- to preside at the ordination of Deacons and Priests.
- the laying on of hands in confirmation.
- the licensing and institution of clergy.
- the consecration of churches, chapels and burial grounds.
- to visit any and every parish or institution within the Diocese and to review its life and work.
- to review the life and work of those clergy and laity who hold his licence or commission.
- to summon all Synods, Diocesan Conferences and Executive Committees.
- to preside at same, and to delegate said presidency subject to the Canons of his Diocese.
- to attend to the discipline of the Church as provided in Diocesan, Provincial and General Synod Canons.
- to share fully in the sound administration of the Diocese.
(2) The authority and jurisdiction that the Bishop possesses within the Diocese are constitutional:
(a) in being exercised under the Canons of the Diocese, of the Ecclesiastical Province, and of General Synod, and
(b) in being shared with clergy and laity elected to Synod and its Boards and Committees, and
(c) in his obligation to consult with the Metropolitan and fellow Bishops in the Province, and with the Primate and the Canadian House of Bishops, on important matters of Faith, Worship, Order, discipline, and the Mission of the Church.
(3)(a) Only under the most exceptional circumstances, and on a temporary basis, may a Bishop accept any other appointment with remuneration, and then only with the consent of the Diocesan Executive and the Metropolitan. This consent may be recalled by either party at any time, provided due notice is given.
(b) It is the duty of the Diocese to provide its Bishop (or Bishops) with an adequate stipend and allowances.
(4) All Bishops are required to be resident within their Diocese for at least nine months in each calendar year. In the assessment of this obligation consideration should be given to the time spent representing the Diocese, the Province or the National Church in international, national and provincial meetings.
(5)(a) All Bishops shall be entitled to three months' Leave of Absence from their Diocese with full stipend and allowances on the completion of five years service, and thereafter three months for every five years completed.
(b) The Leave of Absence shall not be cumulative from one five-year period to the next.
(c) Any Bishop taking Leave of Absence, shall report to the Diocesan Executive and the Metropolitans on the measures he is taking for his ministry and Administration during his absence. The Metropolitan shall satisfy himself that the measures are sufficient, and shall take any necessary steps to ensure that the measures agreed to are being duly maintained.
8. A Diocesan Bishop in Relation to the Clergy.
(1) Among the clergy who hold his license, the Bishop is the Chief Pastor, and Chief Liturgical Officer.
(2) The Bishop shall arrange for periodic retreats and conferences of the Clergy for their spiritual and intellectual renewal, and arrange for their post ordination study and training.
(3) The Bishop shall exercise a pastoral concern for the families of the Clergy, and according to the means at his discretion assist them at times of their special need.
(4) In considering recourse to the Diocesan and General Synod Canons on discipline the Bishop shall not proceed to definitive action without consulting his Chancellor, and appropriate senior Clergy of the Diocese.
Subjects
Guidelines on Bishops
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops. Ad Hoc Committee on Guidelines on Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops. Constitution
Less detail

Information regarding the World and Theological and Biblical Disciplines

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7400
Date
1978 January 30 - February 3
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1978 January 30 - February 3
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop Gartrell
Seconder
Bishop Goodman
Text
"That the other recommendations be held over and re-examined after the first meeting in Ottawa. The Committee further recommends that one of the two meetings of the House of Bishops in each subsequent year be held in Ottawa, and that two days of that meeting be normally set aside for continuing education within this category." CARRIED
(See Appendix B.)
Notes
Continuing Education for Bishops: Some Proposals
The following recommendations regarding continuing education opportunities for Bishops were developed at the first meeting of the new House of Bishops Committee on Continuing Education, held in Winnipeg, December 19, 1977.
Present for the meeting were:
Bishop Valentine, Chairman; Bishop Peers; Bishop Goodings and the Rev. Richard Johns, Staff.
Bishop Frame and Bishop Hill are members of the Committee, but were not able to attend this first meeting.
The Committee focussed its attention upon three general areas of concern:
I Preparation and Support of New Bishops
II Useful Skills for the Exercise of Episcope
III Information regarding the World and Theological and Biblical Disciplines
Eight categories were identified as being important to being explored by a new Bishop. In most of these the systematic experience of other Bishops is invaluable. In a few, information must be obtained from other persons with special responsibility and/or expertise. A few others require the solitary discipline of prayerful reflection on the part of a new Bishop himself. The categories are as follows:
A. Information necessary for the Exercise of the Episcopal Ministry
This includes general information about pensions, bursaries for Theological and continuing education and the role and areas of responsibility of the national office. It also includes information about the various resources that are available to a Bishop. In addition, it includes information about the conduct of Confirmations, Inductions, and other Episcopal services. It should probably include information about the writing of Episcopal letters to the clergy and/or to the Dioceses. It would be important to include the various standards and guidelines that have been developed, from time to time, by the House of Bishops.
B. Pressure Areas
It would be helpful for the new Bishop to explore several items under this category. Some assistance regarding appropriate ways to manage conflict, when it arises in the Diocese, would be useful. Similarly, suggestions of how to deal with manipulative people would be useful. It would also be important to explore some of the criteria to be considered in regard to the movement of clergy. In all of this, it would be important to discuss the gracious and effective use of power. Further, it would be important to help a new Bishop prepare for a certain degree of negativity toward the Office of Bishop, and toward the House of Bishops. On the other side of the coin, it would be useful to explore some of the ways of receiving respect for the Office of Bishop, and to even a certain amount of personal adulation. It might be helpful, also, to discuss the Bishop's relationship with the laity of the Diocese.
C. Spiritual Dimension
Under this category, it is important that appropriate resources be provided for spiritual reflection prior to Consecration. Equally important, attention should be given to assisting the new Bishop to develop resources for his continuing pilgrimage toward spiritual maturity.
D. Personnel Dimensions
There are a number of fairly specific items needing attention under this category. They include a discussion of ways to support the clergy of the Diocese, and ways of dealing with difficult clergy. Attention should be given to the appropriate methods of handling vacancies. It would be very important to spend time in regard to the whole question of discipline. This should include some appropriate discussion of the meaning of discipline, and what types of discipline are real and appropriate. For some new Bishops, it might be helpful to have some opportunity to explore appropriate ways of working with a Diocesan office staff.
E. Inter-personal Dimensions
This also is a category with a number of specific items. Some assistance would be helpful in regard to appropriate ways to relate to one's brother Bishops. Guidance from more senior Bishops in regard to the question of loneliness and isolation from the clergy is important. New Bishops would probably welcome a general discussion regarding the varieties of resources that can be available to one in the exercise of an Episcopal ministry. Suggestions regarding how to react effectively when being over protected by clergy and/or laity might be important. It is suggested that there be some discussion of how best to relate to a Cathedral congregation, and its Dean. In some cases, it might be important to explore appropriate relationships with those of one's colleagues who are not elected. The whole area of the effect upon one's family should be carefully explored. It might well be useful to discuss the possibility of the selection of a personal mentor.
F. Leadership Dimension
A number of categories could be explored here. Some reflection on a balance between maintenance tasks on the one hand and vision and planning on the other would be useful. This might well lead into a further discussion of the role of the Bishop as prophetic leader. The category might also include such very practical matters as the style of parish visitation which would be most appropriate.
G. Administrative Dimension
There are several quite practical items needing attention under this category. They would certainly include the rather large question of how to manage one's time and travel. Some attention should be given to the question of correspondence and office procedures. Each Bishop Elect would probably have some specific areas which he would like to explore under this category.
H. Theological Dimension
It is very important that each new Bishop have an opportunity to begin the process of integrating his own understanding of Episcopacy, and the Ministry which he is about to exercise. Some honest exploration and reflection regarding the ongoing tension within the Church between Episcopal and Synodical Dimensions should be included.
Recommendations Regarding New Bishops
The Committee suggests that three specific resources be provided for all new Bishops:
A. Pre-Consecration Seminar
The focus of this Seminar, probably lasting two or three days, would be upon the informational area, the spiritual dimension, and the theological dimension. Some work would also be done in the interpersonal and administrative dimensions.
B. Seminar for Recently Consecrated Bishops
Approximately six months after Consecration, an additional Seminar would be provided. Here again, the time span would probably be two or three days. The focus on this occasion would be on pressure areas, the personnel dimension and the leadership dimension. Some additional time would be spent in the informational area. Also, additional work would be done in the inter-personal dimension, and time would be allowed for some significant theological reflection.
C. Support of Episcopal Couples
Each newly elected Bishop would be encouraged to developed his own appropriate opportunity for reflection on this new ministry and its effect upon his wife and family. Some individuals may choose to spend two or three days alone with their wife thinking and planning together. In other cases, couples may wish to spend two or three days with another Bishop and his wife. While flexibility would be encouraged, each Bishop Elect who is married would be expected to do some disciplined work in this area with his wife.
Several skill areas were identified under this category. It is thought that opportunities for study and training in these areas would be useful for Bishops in their ongoing work and responsibility. These include the areas of marriage breakdown among clergy, personnel procedures, including relevant legal information; the exploration of the prophetic role of the House of Bishops, and ways of coping and living with diversity and tension. In the latter area, it is recognized that the presence of movements within a Diocese can, on occasion, lead beyond diversity to tension and division. Great skill is required to prevent this from happening.
Some of these skill areas could well be explored in the context of a regular meeting of the House of Bishops. Others might better lend themselves to regional seminars of six to eight Bishops.
Recommendations regarding useful Skills for the Exercise of Episcope
The Committee recommends that one full day be set aside at the November, 1978 meeting for work in this area. The specific recommendation of the Committee is that the areas of marriage breakdown among clergy, personnel procedures, and new and renewed movements serve as the subjects for that day. Where necessary, outside persons with particular expertise would be asked to lead study and deliberation.
The Committee further recommends that one full day at one of the meetings of the House of Bishops each year be set aside for work in designated skill areas.
In addition, the Committee requests authorization to develop a proposal for a regional workshop which could be available for groups of six to eight Bishops. Because of the importance of the Lambeth Conference as a continuing education event this year, it is suggested that the proposal be developed some time after Lambeth.
The areas identified in this category include the following:
A. Occasional political briefings regarding national and international affairs
This should undoubtedly include briefings by people at the Cabinet level in the Federal and Provincial Governments, and representatives of other countries, probably at the Ambassadorial level.
B. The Arts
This should include presentations by important persons in the Arts which would indicate the current themes in Arts and Literature
C. Economics
Occasional presentations by leading persons within this discipline could enable the Bishops to be apprised of current thinking in this field.
D. New Dimensions in Theological Thinking
This area should certainly include presentations by people with expertise in the theological discipline. Opportunity should be provided for information regarding new movements, such as liberation theology.
E. New Dimensions in Biblical Understanding
Here again, experts within this discipline could be available to the House from time to time, for updating.
F. Third World Briefing
It seems important that Bishops have an opportunity to hear directly from leaders of countries outside Canada. This is particularly true of countries where we are involved through missionary efforts, or in which we become involved because of our social and Christian concerns.
G. Constitution and National Unity Issues
Because of the major importance of issues in this area, an opportunity should be provided for the Bishops to learn as much as possible about the thinking of persons in leadership roles regarding these issues.
H. Education
Current trends in both public and private education should be presented from time to time, for the edification of Bishops individually, and the House of Bishops corporately.
I. New Movements
The Committee feels that it would be valuable for the House to have an opportunity to be kept aware of the development of new and renewed movements such as Spiritual Healing, the Cursillo Movement, the House Church, etc.
Recommendations re Information regarding the World and Theological and Biblical Disciplines
The Committee proposes that the February, 1979 House of Bishops Meeting be held in Ottawa. The Committee further recommends that two days of that meeting be set aside for intensive work in one or two of the areas identified in this category. The Committee is willing to undertake the necessary planning and preparation of such an event. It is suggested that the areas in this category be given some priority by the House, for the guidance of the Committee.
The Committee further recommends that one of the two meetings of the House of Bishops in each subsequent year be held in Ottawa, and that two days of that meeting be normally set aside for continuing education within this category.
The Committee respectfully requests the House of Bishops to reflect upon and discuss the recommendations included in this report. The Committee stands ready to develop and implement the recommendations according to direction from the House.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Education (Continuing education)
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops - Rules and practice
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Less detail

(ix) Committee on Assistant Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9212
Date
1965 August 18-21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1965 August 18-21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Algoma
Seconder
Bishop of Ontario
Prologue
The report was presented by the Archbishop of Algoma
Text
"That the report be received."
Notes
The Committee Chairman in submitting his report, reminded the House of the background of the report.
The committee on Coadjutor, Suffragan and Assistant Bishops had presented their first report in Banff, 1963 (pages 10 and 11, 1963).
This report arose out of a resolution:
"That the Primate be requested to appoint a small Committee of this House to consider the episcopate in Canada, with particular relation to Suffragan, Co-adjutor and Assistant Bishops."
The Committee had also been asked "To submit a report and Canon at a special meeting of the House which shall be called by the Primate at a time and place to be decided by the Primate."
The Canon submitted sought to solve questions which remained unanswered. There were other points which had been raised on which no unanimous decision has been reached.
e.g. Should there be an Electoral College set up in the election of all Diocesan Bishops?
Can we come to a unanimous decision regarding the use of traditional episcopal signatures?
Is it true that Diocesan bishops desire more authority in the appointment and election of Assistant Bishops?
The proposed canon which follows was discussed by sections.
PROPOSED CANON ON BISHOPS
I The Anglican Church of Canada holds and teaches that from the Apostles' time there have been these Orders in the Ministry of Christ's Church: Bishops, Priests (Presbyters) and Deacons; and no man shall be accounted or taken to be a lawful Bishop, Priest, or Deacon in the Anglican Church of Canada, or permitted to execute any of the offices attached to the same, except he be called, tried, examined and admitted thereunto according to the Ordinal, or has had formerly episcopal consecration or ordination in some Church whose orders are recognized and accepted by the Anglican Church of Canada.
II Before any person is consecrated to the episcopate, the Metropolitan of the Province must satisfy himself that the person possesses the qualifications for the office. The Bishop-elect must be a Priest of not less than five years standing, and thirty years of age. He must possess good character, piety, learning, a zeal for souls and prudence. He should be sound in health of body and mind.
III The constitutive elements in the making of a Bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada are:
- (a) In the ordering of a Bishop for a Diocese that has become vacant, (that is, the ordering of Diocesan Bishop), the concurrence of the Metropolitan in the arrangements for the electing body; and in the ordering of a Bishop to serve as an assistant to the Diocesan Bishop, the consent of the Metropolitan and Bishops of the Province to the decision of a Synod to provide their Bishop with episcopal assistance.
- (b) Election by an absolute majority of the clergy, and an absolute majority of the Lay Delegates to Synod, voting separately, at a Synod summoned in accordance with the Canons of the Diocese on the Election of Bishops.
- (c) Free acceptance by the person elected within a space of seven days after his receiving notification of his election as Bishop.
- (d) Ratification of the election by the Metropolitan and Bishops of the Province in accordance with the method of ratification prescribed in the Provincial Canons. This ratification constitutes the Bishop elect, after his Consecration, a member of the Provincial House of Bishops.
- (e) Consecration of the Bishop-elect according to the "From of Ordaining of a Bishop" by the Metropolitan, or by some bishop appointed to act in his behalf, assisted by at least two other Bishops, holding jurisdiction in two Dioceses of the Provinces other than that of the Metropolitan. If circumstances are such as to make it impossible to provide the two other Bishops from other Dioceses within the Province, it is permissible that they should be found elsewhere, but in no circumstances shall there be less than three Bishops taking part in the Consecration of a Bishop.
- (f) The registration of the Election and Consecration of the Bishop in the Registers of the Diocese, the Province and of General Synod.
IV The effects of Ordination and its obligations, are permanent, in the same way that the effects and obligations of Baptism are permanent.
- (a) The Bishop was made Deacon, and after his Consecration he still remains a servant. His Diaconate is extended and made more onerous, for he now becomes a servant of the servants of God.
- (b) He was ordained Priest. He never ceases to be a Priest. Among his clergy, he is an equal in all respects as to his Priesthood. His obligation to preach the Gospel and to minister the Sacraments of Christ never cease.
- (c) The unity of the ordained ministry lies in this common priesthood of the Gospel and Sacraments, and in the apostolate and mission of the whole Church to the world. Among the clergy and pastors of the Church, the Bishop is Chief Pastor, the "Pastor Pastorum." It appertains specially to his office to teach and uphold sound doctrine, and to banish and drive away all erroneous and strange opinions; and, himself an example of righteous and godly living, it is his duty to set forward and maintain quietness, love and peace among all men.
V All bishops are equal in regard to their consecration and office; they differ in their jurisdiction. Among Bishops we distinguish the following.
- (a) Bishops that have pre-eminence and jurisdiction not only within their own Dioceses, but throughout an Ecclesiastical Province are called "Metropolitans," and bear the title of "Archbishop." The jurisdiction is such as is defined in the Canons of the Province.
- (b) Bishops that have jurisdiction in a Diocese are called "Diocesans" or "Ordinaries."
- (c) Bishops elected to assist their Diocesan include the following classifications: Coadjutors, Suffragans with Title, Suffragans without Title.
- (d) Bishops who after resigning from their episcopal office, hold Special Licences.
VI Every Bishop has within his Diocese jurisdiction as Ordinary.
VII Every Bishop is, within his Diocese, the Principal Minister, and to him belongs the right, of celebrating the rites of Ordination and Confirmation; of Consecrating new Churches, Chapels, Churchyards and Burial Grounds; of instituting to all vacant benefices; of admitting by licence to all other vacant ecclesiastical offices; of holding visitations to the end that he may get some good knowledge of the state, sufficiency, and ability of the clergy and other persons whom he is to visit; of summoning all Synods and Diocesan Conferences; and of presiding therein, either in person or by such deputy as he may lawfully appoint.
VIII Every Bishop shall be faithful in admitting persons into Holy Orders and in celebrating the rite of Confirmation as often and in as many places as shall be convenient, and shall provide, as much as in him lies, that in every place within his diocese, there shall be sufficient Priests to Minister the Word and Sacraments to the people that are therein.
IX The authority and jurisdiction that the Bishop possesses within his Diocese are constitutional:
- (a) in being exercised under the Canons of the Diocese, of the Province and of General Synod, and
- (b) in being shared with clergy and laity elected to Synod and to serve on its Board and Committees.
- (c) In accordance with the principle of the collegiality of Bishops in maintaining a close relationship with the Metropolitan and the fellow Bishops in the Province, and with the Primate and Canadian House of Bishops, in consultation with them, on important matters of Faith and Order.
X (a) There is inherent in the Office of Bishop, as Father in God and Chief Pastor, the duty to maintain the Discipline of Christ, to hear confession, to offer advice and correction; to receive complains or charges under the Canon Law or the Moral Law.
- (b) The Bishops shall follow a course, if possible, that will avoid all notoriety, and public scandal. It lies entirely in his discretion as to whether he will permit a complainant to proceed to formal litigation in the Bishop's Court.
- (c) If a complainant is not satisfied with the Bishop's refusal to permit ecclesiastical litigation, he may carry the case to the Metropolitan.
- (d) If the Bishop has reason to believe that a Canon or the Moral Law is being infringed and no person has come forward to lay a complaint, he may direct some person to make an enquiry, and if circumstances justify it, to lay a complaint.
- (e) The Bishop may hear the case himself; he may associate others with him; he may ask some person to hear it for him. However, in no case shall a verdict be rendered but in the name of the Bishop, and by the Bishop himself. Where the verdict implies some penalty, like suspension, or deprivation, the bishop shall first consult with his Chancellor before rendering the verdict.
XI (a) According to the vows taken at his Ordination, the Diocesan Bishop must devote himself to the work of the Church of God in the Diocese. Only under the most exceptional circumstances, and on a temporary basis, may be accept any other appointment with remuneration, and that with the consent of his own Executive and the Metropolitan. This consent may be recalled by either party at any time, provided due notice is given.
- (b) Because the Diocesan Bishop may not hold two positions, (and be a "Pluralist") it is the duty of his Diocese to provide him with a Stipend and Allowances sufficient to keep him free from any financial anxiety and embarrassment.
- (c) It is the duty of the Metropolitan to make an enquiry periodically, either himself, or with the help of a Committee of the Provincial Synod, to satisfy himself that the provisions of this clause are being met in the dioceses under his jurisdiction.
XII (a) The Anglican Church of Canada recognizes no distinction between the status of Bishops that serve in dioceses receiving Grants-in-aid from General Synod, and those who do not.
- (b) The fact that part of the income of the Episcopal Fund of any diocese is derived from sources outside the Diocese does not impair the authority of the Bishop and Synod of that Diocese.
- (c) The vows of obedience which a Bishop takes at his Consecration are incompatible with any special agreements or special work that impair the integrity of the Bishop's relationship with his own Synod, the Provincial Synod and the General Synod.
XIII (a) If a Diocesan Bishop desires Episcopal Assistance and his Synod consents, and makes sufficient financial provision for one, the matter shall be laid before the Metropolitan who, in accordance with Provincial Canons, shall obtain and give the consent of the Provincial Authority to the holding of the election.
- (b) While the Provincial Authority may give or deny its consent to the election of an Assistant Bishop, it lies with the Diocesan Authority, the Bishop and his Executive, to determine the Title and Work of Assistant Bishop to be elected. This shall be done, and properly recorded in the minutes of the Executive Committee of the Diocese before the election, and announced publicly at the Elective Synod. When a person is elected Assistant Bishop, he shall be informed of the particular terms of his appointment. If he accepts the Election, it is understood that he also accepts the terms of the appointment.
- (c) These terms may thereafter be changed only with the consent of the Diocesan with his Executive, and of the Assistant Bishop himself.
- (d) If an Assistant Bishops is elected, and the Diocese has not laid down beforehand the terms of his appointment, it is understood that his position in the diocese is that of a Suffragan Bishop without Title and without a defined Jurisdiction.
- (e) The expression "terms of the appointment" is to be taken to mean:
-- (i) Status or Title of the assistant Bishop, whether Coadjutor, or Suffragan;
-- (ii) Whether responsibility for a territorial area is assigned or not, or responsibility for certain kinds or areas of work;
-- (iii) Place of residence;
-- (iv) Stipend and allowances that are to be paid at the start, on the understanding that they will be reviewed by the Executive of the Diocese and increased periodically thereafter.
XIV (a) If a Diocese requires Episcopal Assistance, but yet is unable to elect or to obtain the services of the person or persons elected, it is permissible for the Diocese to ask the Metropolitan, with or without the aid of the Provincial House of Bishops or Provincial Council, to appoint a person as its Assistant Bishop.
- (b) In the event that a Diocese assigns a power to appoint, it assigns also its power to define the terms of the appointment. Any subsequent change in the terms of the appointment, or in the status of the Assistant Bishop, require the concurrence of the Diocesan Bishop, his Executive, the Assistant Bishop himself, and of the Metropolitan.
XV STATUS AND TITLE OF ASSISTANT BISHOPS: THE COADJUTOR
- (a) The Bishop Coadjutor is an Assistant Bishop who has been already designated as the successor to the Diocesan. If, however, he has already passed the ago of 70 years when the Diocesan retires, he has become ineligible for election as Diocesan.
- (b) Since the Coadjutor is elected with right to succession, it is understood that he will be given the opportunity of coming to know the Diocese, its history and traditions, its Parishes and activities. The Coadjutor serves without restriction as to Title, or Jurisdiction in area or type of work.
- (c) His Title is. "The Coadjutor Bishop of .... (name of Diocese)".
- (d) In the exercise of the Episcopal office, he holds Confirmations, dedications and consecrations, and makes visitations, in his own right, but in consultation with the Diocesan. He ordains, makes appointments of Clergy to parishes, receives their resignations, and convenes meetings of the clergy or of the Synod and its Executive only on the express authority of the Diocesan.
- (e) In the absence of the Bishop, unless Diocesan Canons give other directions, he shall preside at Synods and meetings of the Executive Committee.
- (f) The Coadjutor ranks next in seniority to the Diocesan Bishop. He takes precedence to the Suffragan with Title at services held within the jurisdiction of the Suffragan, only if he is present as the Deputy of the Diocesan himself.
- (g) It is permissible for the Diocesan, with the consent of his Synod or Executive to confer one other remunerative appointment on the Coadjutor, provided that the appointment shall not make it impossible for the Coadjutor to exercise his office throughout the Diocese.
XVI STATUS AND TITLE OF ASSISTANT BISHOPS: THE SUFFRAGANS, WITH OR WITHOUT SPECIAL TITLE
- (a) Among Suffragan Bishops there are to be distinguished --
-- (i) those that bear a special Title, other than that of the Diocese, and
-- (ii) those that bear the Title of the diocese, and are known as the "Suffragan Bishop of .... (name of the Diocese)".
- (b) The Special Title indicates a special responsibility for the Parishes and Clergy of a certain part of the Diocese. This Special responsibility does not impair the authority of the Diocesan in respect to that part of his Diocese, nor on the other hand, does it restrict the Suffragan in the exercise of his office to one part of the Diocese only. The Suffragan with Title is available for duty throughout the Diocese at the direction of the Diocesan, but it will be expected that Confirmations, dedications, consecrations, the holding of retreats for and visitations of the Clergy within his jurisdiction will be left largely in his hands.
- (c) Suffragan Bishops with Title are not required to resign when the Diocesan retires or deceases.
- (d) The absence of a Special Title indicates that the Suffragan Bishop is more directly and closely assigned to the Diocesan for duty anywhere in the diocese.
- (e) In distinction to the Suffragan with Title, whose special attachment is territorial, the Suffragan without Title has an attachment that is more personal, an attachment to the Diocesan for work anywhere in the Diocese.
- (f) Suffragan Bishops do not succeed the Diocesan by right, but they may be elected to succeed, provided that they have not already reached the age of 70 years.
- (g) It is permissible for the Diocesan, with the consent of his Synod or Executive to confer one other remunerative appointment on the Suffragan Bishop.
XVII RESIGNATIONS ON ACCOUNT OF AGE
- (a) All Bishops shall submit their resignation to the Metropolitan when they attain the age of 70 years. It shall be in the discretion of the Metropolitan, with the agreement of the Bishop concerned, to defer acceptance of the resignation for a period of up to two years.
- (b) Resignation by Metropolitans of both their Diocesan and Provincial administration shall be submitted to the Provincial House of Bishops, and shall be governed by the same regulations.
- (c) Resignation by the Primate of his Primatial Office shall be submitted to the Canadian House of Bishops, and shall be governed by the same regulations.
XVIII All Bishops, both Diocesan and Assistant, are required to fullfill the law of Residence by spending at least 9 months of each calendar year within the limits of their Diocese. They shall not so arrange their Leaves of Absence in such a way, at the end of one year and the beginning of the next that they are absent from their diocese for more than three months at a time. If the circumstances are exceptional, and the Executive of the Diocese consents, the Metropolitan may extend the Leave of Absence beyond three months.
XIX (a) All Bishops shall be entitled to six months' Leave of Absence from their Diocese with full stipend and allowances on the completion of six years of service, and thereafter six months for every six years completed.
- (b) The Leave of Absence shall not be cumulative from one six year period to the next.
- (c) Any Bishop taking Leave of Absence, shall report to his Metropolitan on the measures he is taking for his Ministry and Administration during his absence. The Metropolitan shall satisfy himself that the measures are sufficient, and shall take any necessary steps to ensure that the measures agreed to are being duly maintained by those who have accepted the responsibilities.
- (d) If a Bishop is asked to undertake some special work for the Church that requires his absence from his Diocese for a period in excess of the normal annual Leave of Absence, and the Synod or the Executive of his Diocese consents to his acceptance of this work, it shall lie with the Metropolitan and his House of Bishops to take the matter under review. They shall satisfy themselves that the Diocese in question is provided with sufficient Episcopal oversight. They shall determine how the Law that prohibits Diocesans from holding two positions and drawing two stipends (Pluralism) is to be applied to the case.
They shall consider no Diocese is due to honour the government of a Bishop whom they have not freely elected, either as the Diocesan or his Assistant Bishop, excepting in an emergency and on a temporary basis.
If they are satisfied on these and other such points, the Metropolitan and House of Bishops may grant Leave of Absence to a diocesan for a period up to 5 years, on the conditions agreed to between the Diocesan and the Provincial House of Bishops, which shall be recorded in the minutes of that House.
Such an agreement may be revised from time to time with the consent of the Metropolitan and his House of Bishops, the Diocesan and the Executive of the Diocese.
The Leave of Absence shall not be renewed after its expiry, at the end of 5 years or earlier, excepting with the consent of the Synod of the Diocese and the recommendation of the Provincial House of Bishops made to and accepted by the Canadian House of Bishops.
XX (a) Any Diocesan Bishop who has reached the age of 68 years and is within two years of his retirement, may give notice of his retirement to the Metropolitan and to the Synod or Executive of his Diocese, and require that he be provided with Episcopal Assistance. The Bishop elected on the grounds of "impending retirement" shall be a Coadjutor with right to succeed, provided that there be no Coadjutor to the Diocesan already.
- (b) If a Diocese requires Episcopal Assistance on the grounds of the disability or infirmity of the Diocesan, or of the growth of the work beyond his powers, the initiative in seeking Assistance shall lie (a) with the Diocesan with the consent of his Synod, or in the event of the Bishop's unwillingness or inability to act, (b) with the Executive Committee of the Diocese in consultation with the Chancellor, or in the failure of both to act, (c) with the Metropolitan.
- (c) If a Bishop requires Episcopal Assistance, and his Synod or Executive feels unable to make sufficient financial provision, the Metropolitan shall meet the Executive to review the matter. If he deems it wise, an appeal shall be sent forward to the Primate and General Synod for a Grant sufficient for the need.
- (d) No Grant shall be made by General Synod to a Diocese for Episcopal Assistance except on the conclusion of an agreement between the General Synod and the Diocese in which is specified the amount of the Grant, the status, title, work, place of residence and jurisdiction of the Bishop to be elected, and the duration of the agreement.
(e) Such an agreement shall have force only during the episcopate of the Diocesan Bishop, who is partner to it. The Grant may be continued only if his successor applies for it, and makes a similar agreement with General Synod. The Agreement should provide for periodic review and for the change of its terms, with the consent of both parties.
Section I was given general approval
Section II was given general approval
Section III was referred back to the committee for further consideration in the light of discussion
Section IV was approved
Section V was given general approval
Section VI to be combined with Section VII
Section VII approved in substance
Section VIII approved
Section IX - XI referred back to Committee with suggestions.
Section XII approved
Section XIII referred with suggestions to committee
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Suffragan Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Assistant Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Coadjutor Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops. Constitution
Less detail

Message to Absent Members

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9202
Date
1965 August 18-21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1965 August 18-21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Brandon
Seconder
Bishop of Ottawa
Prologue
(ii) Regrets
Regrets with good wishes were received from the Bishop of James' Bay (Clarke), the Bishop of Toronto (Wilkinson), Bishop Sovereign (senior bishop in years of consecration in the Canadian Church), Bishop Ragg, Bishop Robinson and Bishop Waterman.
(iii) Resignation of Bishop Coleman
The Primate stated that Bishop Coleman has been obliged to submit his resignation from his diocese as of the end of August [1965] because of deterioration in his health. Archbishop Sexton reported that Bishop Coleman has been ordered by his medical advisors to give up work for at least a year. Bishop Coleman possesses great gifts and the Metropolitan said he had accepted his resignation with deep regret. The Primate requested the support of every consideration and prayer on his behalf that he may be able in a year's time to enter again into the full exercise of his episcopal ministry.
The status of Bishop Coleman for the immediate future is a Provincial matter though the Primate felt that he should be considered as "on leave of absence". It was suggested that the Metropolitan of British Columbia should set up a small committee to consider the canonical relationship to the Canadian episcopate of a bishop who resigns his office, this not being clearly defined by the present canons. The suggestion was received favourably without formal action.
The Primate expressed pleasure at the presence of Bishop Dean, Executive Officer of the Anglican Communion, who had come to attend the meetings of the House and General Synod; also, Bishop Greenwood who has returned to take over episcopal duties in the Diocese of Cariboo during Bishop Dean's absence, was warmly welcomed.
Text
That a message of good wishes be sent to all members of the House who are not in attendance.
Notes
In addition to those already mentioned this was to include Archbishop Barfoot, Archbishop Dixon, Archbishop Carrington and Bishop Jefferson.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops - Greetings
Coleman, William Robert, 1917-1992
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Clothing
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Less detail

(viii) Proposed Canon on Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8606
Date
1966 August 16-19
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1966 August 16-19
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Niagara
Seconder
Bishop of Newfoundland
Prologue
The Archbishop of Algoma, on behalf of his Committee, presented suggested revisions to the proposed Canon on Bishops as recorded in the 1965 Minutes. The House spent the rest of the second session on the proposed canon, going through section by section in detail. Following adjournment the subject was taken up again in the third session. At the conclusion of which session, it was moved and carried:
Text
"That further consideration of the proposed Canon on Bishops be now deferred to the 1967 meeting of the House and that Bishops be advised to submit to the appropriate sub-committee any suggestions or comments they may have on the Canon as printed in the Minutes of the 1965 meeting."
Notes
It was agreed that the numerous amendments to the report on the proposed Canon should be submitted by the Secretaries to the Committee on Bishops for inclusion in the next report to be submitted to the House, without being included in the Minutes of this meeting.
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Constitution
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops - Minutes
Less detail

(xiii) Committee on Assistant Bishops (continued)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9270
Date
1965 August 18 - 21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1965 August 18 - 21
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Huron
Seconder
Assistant Bishop of Niagara
Text
"That the House ask the committee to offer alternatives in the new canon, i.e. diocesan election or election by an electoral college".
Notes
The matter of the use of the name of the diocese in episcopal signatures was commended to the Provincial Houses for their consideration.
Section XIV approved
Section XV referred with suggestions to Committee
Section XVI referred with suggestions to Committee
Sections XVII to XX referred with suggestions to Committee
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Insignia
Signatures (Writing) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Suffragan Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Assistant Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Coadjutor Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

(xx) Guidelines on Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8489
Date
1969 November 3-7
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1969 November 3-7
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Ottawa
Seconder
Bishop of Qu'Appelle
Text
"1. That these Guidelines as amended be referred to a special Task Force to be set up by the Primate and the Prolocutor consisting of bishops, priests and laymen.
2. That this Task Force be asked to report to the National Executive Council by February, 1970, on the following matters:
- a) Is a General Synod Canon on the Episcopate desirable ?
- b) If one is desirable, do these Guidelines seem adequate as a basis for such a Canon, or what other material as, for instance, from the Ordinal, should be included ?
- c) Alternatively, should there be presented to the General Synod a position paper on how the Anglican Church of Canada understands the nature and work of a bishop ?
- d) Or what alternative or additional suggestions should be made ?
3. That on the receipt of the report of the Task Force, the N.E.C. be requested to take such action on this matter as it sees fit, such as:
- a) referring the matter to General Synod
- OR
- b) authorizing the publication of a position paper
- c) any other course."
The House adjourned at 12:00 noon and resumed consideration of the motion at the next sitting at which time the motion was carried.
Notes
The fifth sitting commenced at 2:00 p.m. and resumed consideration of the Bishop of Ottawa's motion.
The Bishop of Calgary spoke to an alternative motion which he hoped to have an opportunity to present, seconded by the Bishop of Kootenay, which read as follows:
"That the Primate be asked to appoint a Committee of the House to prepare a position paper on Episcopacy based on the Guidelines of 1967 and 1968 and on the Ordering and Consecrating of a Bishop, and that this position paper be published."
The Bishop of Ottawa's motion was put to the House and carried.
The Bishop of Calgary's motion was put to the House and defeated.
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Coadjutor Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Suffragan Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Assistant Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Guidelines on Bishops
Guidelines for the Use of Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Constitution
Anglican Church of Canada. National Executive Council
Less detail

(xx) Guidelines on Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8490
Date
1969 November 3-7
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1969 November 3-7
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Huron
Seconder
Bishop of Athabasca
Prologue
The Bishop of Montreal suggested a helpful preamble which could be used if the Guidelines were printed and made available for use by others than members of the House.
Text
"That the Guidelines on Bishops from the Minutes of 1967 and 1968 as amended, with the following preamble, be made available to members of the House of Bishops and to Commissioners on Church Union as an interim document. Preamble: The doctrine of episcopacy is contained in the Ordinal: what follows concerns episcope in practice."
Notes
The Guidelines as amended are printed as Appendix B to these Minutes.
APPENDIX B
GUIDELINES ON BISHOPS
Note: The doctrine of episcopacy is contained in the Ordinal. What follows concerns episcope in practice.
I The Anglican Church of Canada holds and teaches that from the Apostles' time there have been these Orders of Ministers in Christ's Church: Bishops, Priests (Presbyters) and Deacons; and no man shall be accounted or taken to be a lawful Bishop, Priest or Deacon in the Anglican Church of Canada, or permitted to execute any of the offices attached to the same, except he be called, tried, examined and admitted thereunto according to the Ordinal, or has had episcopal consecration or ordination in some Church whose orders are recognized and accepted by the Anglican Church of Canada.
II Before any person is consecrated to the episcopate, the Metropolitan of the Province must satisfy himself that the person possesses the qualifications for the office. The Bishop-elect must be a Priest of not less than five years' standing, and thirty years of age. He must possess good character, piety, learning, a zeal for souls and prudence. He should sound in health of body and mind.
III The constitutive elements in the making of a Bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada are:
- (1) In the ordering of a Bishop for a Diocese that has become vacant (that is, in the ordering of a Diocesan Bishop) the consent of the Metropolitan to the arrangements for the electing body must first be obtained; in the ordering of a Bishop to assist the Diocesan, the consent of the Metropolitan and Bishops of the Province to the election must first be obtained.
- (2) Election by the Synod or Electoral Body of the Diocese in accordance with the operative canon of the Ecclesiastical Province or Diocese concerned. Clerical and Lay Delegates shall vote separately, by ballot. Election shall require at least a majority of the votes cast by the Clergy, and by the Laity.
- (3) Free acceptance by the person elected within a space of 14 days after his receiving notification of his election.
- (4) Ratification of the election by the Metropolitan and Bishops of the Province in accordance with the method of ratification prescribed in the Provincial Canons. This ratification constitutes the Bishop-elect, after his Consecration, a member of the Provincial House of Bishops, and of the Upper House of General Synod.
- (5) Consecration of the Bishop-elect according to "The Form of Ordaining or Consecrating of an Archbishop or Bishop" by the Metropolitan, or by some Bishop appointed to act in his behalf, assisted by at least two other Bishops exercising their offices in two Dioceses of the Province other than that of the Metropolitan is necessary. In no circumstances shall there be less than three Bishops taking part in the Consecration of a Bishop.
- (6) The registration of the Election and Consecration of the Bishop in the Registers of the Diocese, the Province and of General Synod.
IV The effects of Ordination, and its obligations, are permanent, in the same way that the effects and obligations of Baptism are permanent.
- (1) The Bishop was made Deacon, and after his Consecration he still remains a servant. His Diaconate is extended and made more onerous, for he now becomes a servant of the servants of God.
- (2) He was ordained Priest. He never ceases to be a Priest. Among his clergy, he is an equal in all respects as to his Priesthood. His obligation to preach the Gospel and to minister the Sacraments of Christ never cease.
- (3) The unity of the ordained ministry lies in this common priesthood of the Gospel and Sacraments, and in the apostolate and mission of the whole Church to the world. Among the clergy and pastors of the Church, the Bishop is Chief Pastor, the "Pastor Pastorum". It appertains specially to his office to teach and uphold sound doctrine, and to banish and drive away all erroneous and strange opinions; and, himself and example of righteous and godly living, it is his duty to set forward and maintain quietness, love and peace among all men.
V Bishops are equal in regard to their consecration and office; they differ in their jurisdiction. Among Bishops we distinguish the following:
- (1) Bishops that have pre-eminence and jurisdiction not only within their own Dioceses, but a jurisdiction throughout the Ecclesiastical Province, as defined in the Canons of that Province, are called "Metropolitans" and bear the title of "Archbishop".
- (2) Bishops that have jurisdictions throughout a Diocese are called "Diocesans" or "Ordinaries".
- (3) Bishops elected to assist the Diocesan Bishop include the following classifications: Coadjutors, Suffragans with Title, and Suffragans without Title.
- (4) Bishops who have resigned, or who are superannuated, and who have been given Special Licences, without election, to perform the duties of a Priest within a Parish, or of Assistant to the Diocesan Bishop. Such Bishops normally work on a part-time basis, and should be described as Assistants to the Bishop. If however, the Diocesan and his Executive provide a regular stipend for this Episcopal Assistance, the Bishop is rightly described as an "Assistant Bishop".
VI A Bishop in relation to his Diocese.
- (1) Every Diocesan Bishop has, within his Diocese, jurisdiction as Ordinary. He is, within his Diocese, the Principal Minister, and to him belongs the right of celebrating the rites of Ordination and Confirmation; of consecrating new Churches, Chapels and Burial Grounds; of instituting clergy to vacant charges; of admitting by licence to all other vacant ecclesiastical offices; of holding visitation that he may have knowledge of the state, sufficiency, and ability of the clergy and other persons whom he is to visit; of summoning all Synods and Diocesan Conferences; and of presiding therein, either in person or by such deputy as he may lawfully appoint.
- (2) The Bishop shall be the President of the Synod or Governing Body of his Diocese, and Chairman of its Executive Committee, either in person or by lawful delegation of his authority.
-- As President of Synod he sits both as Bishop of the Diocese, and in matters of Faith, Worship, Order and Mission as the representative of the Canadian House of Bishops.
-- Without the sanction of his Executive Committee and of the Metropolitan he may not divest himself of all responsibility for the administration of the Diocese.
- (3) The authority and jurisdiction that the Bishop possesses within the Diocese are constitutional:
-- (a) in being exercised under the Canons of the Diocese, of the Ecclesiastical Province, and of General Synod, and
-- (b) in being shared with clergy and laity elected to Synod and its Boards of Committees, and
-- (c) in his obligation to consult with the Metropolitan and fellow Bishops in the Province, and with the Primate and the Canadian House of Bishops on important matters of Faith, Worship, Order, and the Mission of the Church.
- (4) (a) According to the vows taken at his consecration, the primary responsibility of the Diocesan Bishop is the work of the Church of God in the Diocese. Only under the most exceptional circumstances, and on a temporary basis, may he accept any other appointment with remuneration, and that with the consent of his own Executive and the Metropolitan. This consent may be recalled by either party at any time, provided due notice is given.
-- (b) Because the Diocesan Bishop may not hold two appointments with remuneration it is the duty of his Diocese to provide him with a Stipend and Allowances sufficient to keep him free from any financial anxiety and embarrassment.
-- (c) It is the duty of the Metropolitan to make an enquiry periodically, either himself, or with the help of a Committee of the Provincial Synod, to satisfy himself that the provisions of clause (b) are being met in the Dioceses under his jurisdiction.
- 5. (a) The Anglican Church of Canada recognizes no distinction between the status of Bishops who serve in Dioceses receiving Grants-in-aid from General Synod, and those that do not.
-- (b) The fact that part of the income of Episcopal Fund of any Diocese is derived from sources outside the Diocese does not impair the authority of the Bishop and Synod of that Diocese.
-- (c) The vows of obedience which a Bishop takes at his Consecration are incompatible with any special agreements or special work that impair the integrity of the Bishop's relationship with his own Synod, the Provincial Synod and the General Synod.
- (6) All Bishops, both Diocesan and Assistant, are required to fulfil the law of Residence by spending at least 9 months of each calendar year within the limits of their Diocese. They shall not so arrange their Leaves of Absence in such a way, at the end of one year and the beginning of the next that they are absent from their Diocese for more than three months at a time. If the circumstances are exceptional, and the Executive of the Diocese consents, the Metropolitan may extend the Leave of Absence beyond three months.
- (7) (a) All Bishops shall be entitled to six months' Leave of Absence from their Diocese with full stipend and allowances on the completion of six years of service, and thereafter six months for every six years completed.
-- (b) The Leave of Absence shall not be cumulative from one six year period to the next.
-- (c) Any Bishop taking Leave of Absence, shall report to his Metropolitan on the measures he is taking for his ministry and Administration during his absence. The Metropolitan shall satisfy himself that the measures are sufficient, and shall take any necessary steps to ensure that the measures agreed to are being duly maintained by those who have accepted the responsibilities.
VII A Bishop in Relation to his Clergy.
- (1) Among the Clergy whose names are on his Diocesan Roll, the Bishop is Chief Pastor, and Chief Liturgical Minister.
- (2) In maintaining the Discipline of Christ among the Clergy, he shall act in the spirit of a true Father in God.
-- If complaints or accusations are brought to the Bishop about one of his clergy, he must follow a course, as far as possible that will avoid all notoriety and public scandal.
-- In considering recourse to the discipline of Canon 28 of the General Synod, the Bishop shall not proceed to definitive action without consulting his Chancellor, and/or senior and prudent clergy of the Diocese.
- (3) The Bishop shall provide retreats and conferences of the Clergy for their spiritual and intellectual renewal; and arrange for their post ordination study and training.
- (4) The Bishop shall exercise a fatherly concern for the families of the Clergy, and according to the means at his discretion gassiest them at times of their special need.
VIII The Election or Appointment of assistant Bishops, (Coadjutor, Suffragan and Assistant Bishops).
- (1) If a Diocesan Bishop desires Episcopal Assistance and his Synod consents, and makes sufficient financial provision for one, the matter shall be laid before the Metropolitan who, in accordance with Provincial Canons, shall obtain and give the consent of the Provincial Authority to the holding of the election.
- (2) While the Provincial Authority may give or deny its consent to the election of an assistant Bishop, it lies with the Diocesan Authority, the Bishop and his Synod or his executive, to determine the Title and Work of the assistant Bishop to be elected. This shall be done and recorded in the Minutes of the meeting before the Election, and announced publicly at the meeting of the Electing Body. The person elected shall be informed of the terms of his appointment. If he accepts the Election, it is understood that he also accepts the terms of the appointment.
- (3) These terms may thereafter be changed only with the consent of the Diocesan with his Executive, and of the assistant Bishop himself.
- (4) If an assistant Bishop is elected, and the Diocese has not laid down beforehand the terms of appointment, it is understood that his position in the Diocese is that of Suffragan Bishop without Title and definite jurisdiction.
- (5) The expression 'terms of appointment' is to be taken to mean:
-- (a) Status or Title of the assistant Bishop, whether Coadjutor, Suffragan, or Assistant;
-- (b) Whether responsibility for a territorial area is assigned or not, or responsibility for certain kinds or spheres of work;
-- (c) Place of residence;
-- (d) Stipend and allowances that are to be paid at the start, on the understanding that they will be reviewed periodically by the Executive of the Diocese;
-- (e) That the assistant Bishop be 'ex officio' a member of the Executive Committee of the Diocese or its equivalent.
IX The Status and Work of assistant Bishops.
- (1) The Bishop Coadjutor is an assistant Bishop who has been already designated as the successor to the Diocesan. Any person who has already passed the age of 70 years when the Diocesan retires, is ineligible to act as Diocesan.
- (2) Since the Coadjutor is elected with the right to succession, it is understood that he will be given the opportunity of coming to know the Diocese, its history, and traditions, its Parishes and activities. The Coadjutor serves without restriction as to Title, or Jurisdiction in area or type of work.
- (3) His Title is, "The Coadjutor Bishop of .... (name of Diocese)".
- (4) In the exercise of the Episcopal Office, he holds Confirmations, dedications and consecrations, and makes visitation, in his own right, but in consultation with the Diocesan. He ordains, makes appointments of Clergy to parishes, receives their resignations, and convenes meetings of the clergy or of the Synod and its Executive only on the express authority of the Diocesan.
- (5) In the absence of the Bishop, unless Diocesan Canons give other directions, he shall preside at Synods and meetings of the Executive Committee.
- (6) The Coadjutor ranks next in seniority to the Diocesan Bishop. He takes precedence to the Suffragan with Title at services held within the jurisdiction of that Suffragan, only if he is present as the Deputy of the Diocesan himself.
- (7) It is permissible for the Diocesan, with the consent of his Synod or Executive to confer one other remunerative appointment on the Coadjutor, provided that the appointment shall not make it impossible for the Coadjutor to exercise his office throughout the Diocese.
- (8) No Bishop should be named Coadjutor who has the prospect of serving in that capacity for over three years.
B. The Suffragan, with or without Special Title
- (1) Among Suffragan Bishops there are to be distinguished-
-- (a) those that bear a special Title, other than that of the Diocese, and
-- (b) those that bear the Title of the Diocese, and are known as the "Suffragan Bishop .... (name of the Diocese)".
- (2) The Special Title indicates a special responsibility for the Parishes and Clergy of a certain part of the Diocese. This Special responsibility does not impair the authority of the Diocesan in respect to that part of his Diocese, nor on the other hand, does it restrict the Suffragan in the exercise of his office to one part of the Diocese only. The Suffragan with a Title is available for duty throughout the Diocese at the direction of the Diocesan, but it will be expected that Confirmations, dedications, consecrations, the holding of retreats for and visitations of the Clergy within his jurisdiction will be left in his hands.
- (3) The absence of a Special Title indicates that the Suffragan Bishop is more directly and closely assigned to the Diocesan for duty anywhere in Diocese.
- (4) Suffragan Bishops are not required to resign when the Diocesan retires or deceases.
- (5) Suffragan Bishops do not succeed the Diocesan by right, but they may be elected to succeed, provided that they have not already reached the age of 70 years.
- (6) It is permissible for the Diocesan, with the consent of his Synod or Executive to confer one other remunerative appointment on the Suffragan Bishop.
C. The Assistant Bishop, or the Assistant to the Bishop
- (1) In addition to Coadjutor and Suffragan Bishops there are also Assistant Bishops.
-- A person appointed with the Title Assistant Bishop is normally already a bishop, and the procedure in his appointment varies. When it is to be by diocesan election the regulations outlined in Clause VIII, shall apply.
-- When Assistant Bishops or Assistants to the Bishop are appointed rather than elected, their nomination lies with the Diocesan Bishop who shall act with the consent of, and on terms agreed to, by the Diocesan authorities (the Executive or the Synod) and by the Metropolitan.
- (2) Assistant Bishops may serve part time or full time, according to their agreement with the Bishop and Executive, but if they with to hold any other appointment in addition to the Bishopric they must obtain the consent of the Diocesan.
- (3) Superannuated Bishops may be appointed Assistant Bishops on a part time basis only. (See Clause V, (4).)
- (4) The appointment of an Assistant Bishop terminates when the Diocesan Bishop dies or retires.
- (5) If a Diocese requires Episcopal assistance, but is unable to obtain the necessary majorities of Clergy and Laity for election, or is unable to obtain the consent of the person who is elected, the Diocese
-- (a) may set up a special Electoral College, not otherwise provided for but not excluded by Diocesan Canons, in consultation with the Metropolitan, or
-- (b) may ask the Metropolitan to appoint a person as its assistant Bishop.
- (6) If a Diocese requires Episcopal assistance either permanently or temporarily, the initiative in seeking assistance shall lie
-- (a) normally with the Diocesan with the consent of his Synod or Executive Committee, or
-- (b) with the Executive Committee of the Diocese in consultation with the Chancellor, or
-- (c) with the Metropolitan.
- (7) If a Bishop requires Episcopal assistance, and his Synod or Executive cannot or will not make sufficient financing provision, the Metropolitan may meet the Executive to review the matter, and if he deems it wise an appeal shall be sent forward to the Primate and General Synod for a grant for this purpose.
X Resignations on Account of Age.
- (1) All Bishops shall submit their resignations to the Metropolitan when they attain the age of 70 years.
- (2) Resignations by Metropolitans of both their Diocesan and Provincial administration shall be submitted to the Provincial House of Bishops, and shall be governed by the same regulations.
- (3) Any Diocesan Bishop who has reached the age of 68 years and is within two years of his retirement, may give notice of his retirement to the Metropolitan and to the Synod or Executive of his Diocese, and require that he be provided with Episcopal Assistance. The Bishop elected on the grounds of "impending retirement" shall be a Coadjutor with right to succeed, provided that there be no Coadjutor to the Diocesan already.
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Guidelines on Bishops
Guidelines for the Use of Bishops
Less detail

(xxii) Office and Role of a Bishop (continued. See item vii)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8622
Date
1966 August 16-19
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1966 August 16-19
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Prologue
The Bishop of Toronto reported on behalf of the Committee appointed by the Primate to consider the use of the two papers on the Role of a Bishop, making three recommendations:
1. That the two papers be not combined.
2. The paper by the Archbishop of Algoma had been prepared with the House of Bishops in mind. It was recommended that this paper be incorporated in the Minutes of this meeting. (See Appendix). It was also pointed out that this kind of document will be of value to the appropriate commission which may eventually be set up in conjunction with the United Church. It was therefore recommended that the paper be given to the Committee on Christian Unity for whatever use it deems advisable.
3. The paper prepared by the Bishop of Huron had been requested by the Primate in response to a letter from the Diocese of Kootenay. It answers questions being asked by members of the United Church and is not a definitive statement of the Anglican view of episcopacy. The Committee asked the House of Bishops to decide re the use which should be made of the paper. Two alternatives were suggested, one of which should be followed:
(a) that, in view of the origin of the paper as a response to a question from the Diocese of Kootenay, directed to this House by the Committee on Christian Unity, we ask that Committee to determine the use to be made of the paper, or
(b) that the Primate, in consultation with the Bishop of Huron, and, in the light of the decision of the United Church General Council, decide when the document should be released. It may be that questions about Bishops will be raised by the United Church Council which will make it necessary to further revise the paper, and perhaps to make additions to it. In any case it was recommended that there be no release of the paper prior to September 8th.
Text
"That the recommendation in Section (b) be approved."
Notes
APPENDIX
STATEMENT ON THE ROLE OF BISHOPS
by the Archbishop of Algoma [William L.W. Wright]
I. THE BISHOP AS FATHER-IN-GOD
The bishop is a shepherd. He is a servant. "I know my sheep and am known of mine". As the bishop carries his pastoral staff into the churches, it is a reminder both to him and to his people of the pastoral nature of his office. The role "Father-in-God" finds expression as the bishop celebrates the Holy Eucharist in the midst of the family of God or brings the message of a prophet from the Word of God, or shares in the joys and sorrows of each member of the flock. Naturally the devotional life of a Bishop must always be given its true place. This prayer life must be rooted and grounded in the lasting but indispensable practice of regular meditation.
It is in an essentially pastoral context that the Anglican Church almost invariably conceives of the episcopate, and we cannot doubt that in this she is faithful to the Good Shepherd Himself. And the bishop shares this with those who are called to the priesthood. They are "to feed and provide for the Lord's family; to seek for Christ's sheep that are dispersed abroad." For all the degrees of the ministry -- bishop, priest and deacon alike, the ideal of the Anglican Communion has always been a pastoral one.
Jeremy Taylor -- "Pray much and very fervently for all your parishioners", he writes to the clergy of his diocese, "and for all men that belong to you, and all that belong to God; but especially for the conversion of souls; and be very jealous for nothing but God's glory, and the salvation of the world, and particularly of your charges".
II. THE BISHOP AS CHIEF LITURGICAL MINISTER
Since the bishop is the primary liturgical minister of his diocese, he ordains the priests to whom the direct charge of the flock is delegated, while it remains his as well as theirs, and he confirms each one who by Baptism has been admitted into the Church. But in the exercise of these episcopal functions, we are reminded that episcopacy is not an institution in itself, not an organism outside of, even less over against the Church; but it is a function of the Church and without the Church it is nothing. That is why the Church has made the calling to its ministry, the creation of its bishops, priests and deacons, its careful task. The laying-on of hands is the regular act which, performed with prayer, turns the person called into a servant of the Church. Here the Ministry of the Church is drawn into the realm of the sacramental or the sacred.
The Church, as a whole, has a priestly ministry towards the world. The Church must feel the burdens and sufferings of humanity and bring them into the presence of God. Hers is a glorious priestly ministry of intercession. From God's presence she is to go out into the world, bringing to the world God's blessing in in the showing forth of God's love. This general sacramental ministry of the Church towards the world is sadly marred by her unfaithfulness and divisions. But in spite of it, God has no substitute for the Church. This is the Church's glory and also the Church's tragedy. Considerable more study might rightly be given to the role of the bishop as the chief liturgical minister as closer relationships are forged with our Orthodox brethren. They will examine closely our conviction of the bishop being the chief liturgical minister of the diocese.
III. THE BISHOP AS ADMINISTRATOR
A bishop is not primarily an administrator but these duties must be discharged. The Bishop as an administrator is also at the same time fulfilling his duties as a pastor. This fact together with the statements which follow might be borne in mind as dialogue and discussion take place with our separated brethren.
Anglicans may be divided between the sacramental and organizational views of episcopacy, some contending that it is an essential part of the Church itself, others that it is a convenient form of administration. Between these two views of episcopacy, it is usual to draw a very hard and fast distinction as if they were necessarily mutually exclusive. Yet experience has shown they may be held together provided that the organizational view be recognized as subordinate to the sacramental. The organizational view expresses an important but secondary truth, dependent upon the primary truth expressed in the sacramental view that episcopacy is essential because it is part of God's design for His Church, and therefore indispensable to the fulness of its life. Non-Anglicans must be reminded that the bishop is not an arbitrary prelate acting on his own and dictating policies which command universal diocesan obedience. He acts in and through the councils of the Church permeating the development of such actions with the mind of Christ. Believing in the Lordship of Christ, we cannot accept a limited interpretation of the pastoral ministry of the Church, and the bishop, as representing in his office the total ministry of the people of God, should not hesitate to assume administrative responsibilities placed on him by the Church under the guidance of the Holy Spirit.
But in this context of administration, he must mobilize the whole Church to share with him these responsibilities. The laity have a definite part to play in this. Instead of being "overlooked" or "disinterested onlookers," they are guided to share with the bishop the administrative burden in a positive way. The administrative responsibilities belong to the whole people of God, the bishop included.
IV. SOME THOUGHTS ON THE OFFICE OF BISHOP AND CHRISTIAN UNITY
The episcopate is the safe-guard and focus of the unity of the Church in matters of faith and practice. Episcopacy is the symbol of ecclesiastical unity. The view of the early Church was that unity and authority alike were to be found, not in any particular bishop, but in the bishops in their corporate totality. The bishop is a member of a college, of a house of bishops, of an assembly of bishops. This corporateness is expressed in the act of Consecration by the fact that it is performed by at least three bishops who all lay their hands on the one who is being made bishop. This corporate aspect of the episcopate, although far from apparent in the actual divided state of the Church, is however a sacramental reality. A bishop is not only the bishop of his diocese but a bishop of the Holy Catholic Church, because he is a member of the corporate episcopate coming down through history.
Ramsey -- (The Catholic Church and the Gospel)
"In its bishop, every single Church transcends its own limits and comes in contact with, and merges into other Churches, not in the order of brotherly love and remembrance alone, but in the unity of mysterious and gracious life."
Although every bishop has jurisdiction and special responsibilities in his own diocese, he and his diocese should be concerned with the whole Catholic Church and feel called to share its problems.
It does not, however, follow that the possession of the episcopate guarantees unity or truth. The source of unity, as also of truth, is the Holy Spirit in the Church. It is God reigning in His church and using His own institutions who creates and sustains the Church's unity.
The following statements possess a special significance:
1. Lambeth Conference 1958 -- "We believe that the visible unity of the Church will be found to involve the whole-hearted acceptance of 'a ministry acknowledged by every part of the Church as possessing not only the inward call of the Spirit, but also the commission of Christ and the authority of the whole body."
2. A.G. Hebert -- "Even now we can see that the episcopal office represents the many-sidedness of the Apostolic function. It is not only, or chiefly, that the bishop can exercise a juridical function in checking heretical teachings: but rather that his office covers and correlates with one another, not only sound doctrine but evangelistic work, pastoral oversight of clergy and sound doctrine but evangelistic work, pastoral oversight of clergy and people, and the liturgical ministry of the sacraments, as no other form of ministerial office can do; while the fact that each bishop is consecrated, not by his predecessor in the diocese, but by at least three other bishops from outside it, signifies that his office is of a universal character, as was the Apostolate in its original institution, so that the bishop represents his diocese in his relations with other bishops and diocese, and represents them to it."
Subjects
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - United Church of Canada
United Church of Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Wright, William L.W. (William Lockridge Wright), 1904-1990
Less detail

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