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11 records – page 1 of 2.

2-7 St. Stephen's, Fort Chimo, Québec - Burials. - 1902-1966

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/archivaldescriptions37876
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Description Level
File
Fonds Number
100
Fonds
Diocese of the Arctic fonds
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Sub-series
Sub-series 2-7 St. Stephen's Mission, Fort Chimo (Que.). -- 1902-1970.
Material Type
Textual record
Description Level
File
Scope and Content
File consists of oversize copies of the register of burial records.
Places include: Ungava, George River (Kangiqsualujjuaq), Fort Chimo (Kuujjuaq), False River, Kootlotook, Koksoak, Aloleek, Kotaluk (Leaf River), Port Burwell, Kasegeaksevik, Mukalik, and Payne Bay.
Restrictions
Open
Accession Number
M71-4
Box Number
26
File No
13
Subject
Fort Chimo (Québec)
Kuujjuaq (Québec)
George River (Québec)
Kangiqsualujjuaq (Québec)
Less detail

2-7 St. Stephen's, Fort Chimo, Québec - Marriages. - 1905-1929, 1934

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/archivaldescriptions37872
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Description Level
File
Fonds Number
100
Fonds
Diocese of the Arctic fonds
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Sub-series
Sub-series 2-7 St. Stephen's Mission, Fort Chimo (Que.). -- 1902-1970.
Material Type
Textual record
Description Level
File
Scope and Content
File consists of oversize copies of the register of marriages.
Places of residence include: George River, Fort Chimo, Whale River, Port Burwell, Koolotomsek, Tuktutak, Leaf River, Kowksoak [Koksoak], Taesukalick, Taeskallak, Makkelik.
Restrictions
Open
Accession Number
M71-4
Box Number
26
File No
9
Subject
Fort Chimo (Québec)
Kuujjuaq (Québec)
George River (Québec)
Kangiqsualujjuaq (Québec)
Less detail

2-7 St. Stephen's, Fort Chimo, Québec - Marriages. - 1905-1970

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/archivaldescriptions37870
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Description Level
File
Fonds Number
100
Fonds
Diocese of the Arctic fonds
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Sub-series
Sub-series 2-7 St. Stephen's Mission, Fort Chimo (Que.). -- 1902-1970.
Material Type
Textual record
Description Level
File
Scope and Content
File consists of legal size copies of the register of marriages.
Restrictions
Open
Accession Number
M71-4
Box Number
26
File No
7
Subject
Fort Chimo (Québec)
Kuujjuaq (Québec)
Less detail

2-7 St. Stephen's, Fort Chimo, Québec - Marriages. - 1913-1947

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/archivaldescriptions37873
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Description Level
File
Fonds Number
100
Fonds
Diocese of the Arctic fonds
Record Group
Diocese of the Arctic
Series
SERIES 2 MISSION STATION RECORDS
Sub-series
Sub-series 2-7 St. Stephen's Mission, Fort Chimo (Que.). -- 1902-1970.
Material Type
Textual record
Description Level
File
Scope and Content
File consists of oversize copies of the register of marriages.
Places included are Fort Chimo, Leaf River, George River, Makalik (Whale River), Lower Koksoak, Aupaluk, Fort Mackenzie, Payne Bay, Great Whale River, Kokapic, Upper Koksoak River, Tameruseak, Mukalik, and Diana Bay.
Restrictions
Open
Accession Number
M71-4
Box Number
26
File No
10
Subject
Fort Chimo (Québec)
Kuujjuaq (Québec)
George River (Québec)
Kangiqsualujjuaq (Québec)
Less detail

The Carlisle Experiment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article535
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 July
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 July
Issue
26
Page
1-14 p.
Notes
Contents: [List of] Publications of the Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada -- The Carlisle Experiment.
"The measures taken in England and Scotland during the war to combat the very serous increase in drunkenness brought about by the abnormal conditions created by the vast industrial effort to supply munitions are of such interest and importance, even though conditions in Canada may be not precisely the same, that it will be well to examine them somewhat closely" (p. 3). "It is not, however, with this general side of the question that we shall deal now, but rather with the particular and localised experiment of state purchase and control which was tried at Carlisle" (p. 4). "We have now, perhaps, taken this discussion of the merits and demerits of state purchase and control [of alcohol] far enough to allow of a fairly clear idea of the problem being formed. It has been the aim of the Editorial Board of the Council for Social Service to place before church people in Canada successive phases of the liquor problem, and different expedients and experiments for its solution. The Gothenburg system and the Carlisle experiment are, of course, essentially the same in theory, although differing slightly in practice. Both aim at improving the conditions under which intoxicants are retailed, and succeed admirably in their object. The Gothenburg system is confined wholly to the single item of spirits, and for that reason, as abundant evidence shows, it fails to check drunkenness. The English experiment imposes special restrictions upon spirits (the spiritless week-end) but also controls the sale of beer. For that reason it is probable it will have better results than the other. The future developments in State control in Great Britain will be watched with much interest" (p. 14).
Colophon: Hanson, Crozier & Edgar, Kingston.
Subjects
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Liquor laws - Great Britain
Temperance - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prohibition - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Gothenburg system
Less detail

The Gothenburg System

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article471
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 June
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 June
Issue
25
Page
1-16
Notes
"At the present time, when the problems of the total abolition, or failing that, the vigorous control of the liquor traffic is one of the most pressing, not only in Canada but practically all over the world, a brief study of the famous system of control generally known by the name of the city in which it originated, Gothenburg in Sweden, may be useful in presenting for the consideration of all interested in the question at least one solution, or at least partial solution, of the problem". -- p. 3.
"We have now given, both pro and con the opinions of those who have studied the question closely. In all books on the subject there is remarkable unanimity. While praising many features of the system, the conduct of the public-houses, and general air of respectability that has been thrown around the sale of spirits in Sweden, every observer is forced to admit that all is not well. Really the whole criticism of the system may be reduced to three capital points; -- that it has driven the people to consume beer and wine; that it has not reduced drunkenness; that the system of giving a large share of the profits to the local authorities has the unfortunate effect of making the municipality encourage the sale of spirits". -- p. 13.
Contents: Publications of the Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada -- The Gothenburg System.
Contents divided into sub-sections: Historical -- The Gothenburg System -- Regulations for Public Houses -- Results Obtained -- Success or Failure -- A Further Indictment -- The Final Judgment -- Bibliography -- Appendix: The Norwegian Licensing System.
Colophon: Hanson, Crozier and Edgar, Kingston.
Subjects
Gothenburg system
Liquor laws - Sweden
Temperance - Canada
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Prohibition : A Summary

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article474
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 September
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 September
Issue
28
Page
1-16 p.
Notes
"During the whole course of the long discussion that has accompanied the enforcement of Prohibition in Canada, it has been the aim of the Editorial Board to present to readers of the Bulletin various aspects of the liquor question, judging that a real understanding of the problem involved was, of the most vital importance to the Church as a whole, and that it was the duty of the Council for Social Service to supply what information was possible on the subject. With that end in view no fewer than five of the series of Bulletins have been devoted to various aspects of the problem, and it is thought that a sixth, by way of summary may not be too many, in helping to focus opinion on what are really the pivotal points of the whole question, and perhaps be of service in clarifying the opinions of many on the very vexed problem involved" (p. 2). "We have attempted to give a dispassionate and fair statement of the case. We have outlined the main arguments against Prohibition and have shown the essential fallacies that underlie their reasoning. .... If alcohol is required for sickness it can be obtained through a doctor, the low is not tyrannous, it allows amply for any legitimate use of alcohol. One peculiarly bad feature of the anti-Prohibitionist campaign is the oft-repeated assertion that it is ultimately the aim of the movement to abolish the use of wine from the Holy Communion. This is simply untrue, and does not admit of argument one way or the other" (pp. 15-16). "The Church of England, as had often been remarked, has a peculiar sanity of its own. It may be slow and conservative, in the past it was undoubtedly reactionary, but its opinions on any subject are eminently worthy of the considered attention of everyone. There is no question that the decision of the Church of England in Canada has carried in the past and will still carry in the future great weight on the Prohibition question. The Church will arrive at that conclusion in its own way, uninfluenced by clamour on either side. That each member of the Church may be helped to a wise and judicial decision on the subject has been helped to a wise and judicial decision on the subject has been the sole aim of the Council for Social Service in publishing its series of Bulletins. It leaves the last word to be said by church-people themselves" (p. 16).
Contents divided into sub-sections: The Freedom of the Citizen -- The Difficulties of Enforcement -- The Use and Abuse of Alcohol -- The Use of Drugs -- The Removal of Temptation -- Compulsory Sobriety -- Social Discontent and Prohibition -- A Summary.
Subjects
Prohibition - Canada
Prohibition - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Alcoholism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Temperance - Canada
Temperance - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Lord's Supper - Wine
Less detail

Prohibition in Canada : 2

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33056
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 October
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 October
Issue
5
Page
1-16 p.
Notes
"A consideration of the causes which lead to the use and abuse of alcohol reveal at the very outset three salient facts, namely, that a taste for alcohol is an acquired one, that men drink from well known and specified reasons and for certain obvious purposes, and finally that the drink problem is fundamentally an economic one. Unfortunately, and the fact is one to be heartily deplored, the `temperance' or prohibitions movement has become greatly obscured by a vast number of extraneous and irrelevant side issues, and anyone who attempts to study the question calmly and judiciously finds great difficulty in arriving at the fundamental axioms which underlie it. This this should be so is perhaps inevitable since no great question of moral reform is wholly simple or devoid of complexities. All manner of secondary prejudices, religious, moral, economic and often purely fictitious in their content, obscure the view of the investigator and leave him almost in despair of ever straightening out the tangle. This is particularly true of the prohibition question, and the greatest care must be taken to steer a clear course, between conflicting currents so as to arrive at definite and satisfactory conclusions (p. 2)."
Contents divided into sub-sections: Alcohol and Acquired Taste -- The Use of Alcohol -- The Moderate Drinker -- Why Men Drink -- The Drink Problem and Economic One -- Substitutes for the Saloon -- A Canadian Example -- The Opportunity for Social Service -- Conclusions Arrived At -- Conclusion -- Notes on the Gothenburg System -- Bibliography.
Subjects
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prohibition - Canada
Prohibition - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Liquor laws - Canada
Temperance - Canada
Gothenburg system
Less detail

Prohibition in Canada : I

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article452
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 September
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1917 September
Issue
4
Page
1-24 p.
Notes
"Deeply impressed as the Council is with the sense of its duty towards the Church in carrying out the tasks committed to it, it determined that one of [its] first and most pressing undertakings would be a close study of the working of the laws prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in the various provinces of the Dominion which have enacted them. Although these acts have only been in force for a comparatively short time, it was thought that a sufficient period had elapsed to allow of a fairly accurate judgement being arrived at as to the working of Prohibition in Canada in its earlier stages. The present inquiry must, therefore, be considered, and is designed to be, a preliminary one; to be followed, after a suitable period, by another (p. 3). "The inquiry was aimed at establishing one particular fact, and one only, namely, the verdict of the Anglican clergy on the working of the Prohibition laws during the time they have been in force. Therefore, in reading what follows, it should always be kept in mind that the views expressed are solely those of the clergy (p. 4)". "What then is the verdict of the clergy of the Church of England in Canada with regard to the working of Prohibition laws in their initial stages ? We may now answer that question with confidence. `Prohibition laws in the six provinces that have enacted them are working well; but the measure of their success is in exact ratio to the determination of the authorities to enforce them. While Provincial Prohibition is good, Dominion Prohibition would be infinitely preferable. The benefits gained from these laws are almost incalculable, and the very thought of going back to the old system is out of the question. In a word, the Church of England in Canada is solid for Prohibition'. (pp. 23-24)".
Contents divided into sub-sections: Nature of the Inquiry -- Nova Scotia and P.E.I. -- Ontario -- Manitoba -- Saskatchewan -- Alberta -- Summary -- Nova Scotia -- Ontario -- Manitoba -- Saskatchewan -- Alberta -- Will Canada Tolerate Tanlac ? -- Conclusion.
Colophon: Hanson, Crozier & Edgar, Printers, Kingston, Ont.
Subjects
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Liquor laws - Canada
Prohibition - Canada
Prohibition - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Temperance - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Reconstruction II

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article460
Author
Michell, Humfrey, 1883-1970
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1918 June
Author
Michell, Humfrey, 1883-1970
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1918 June
Issue
13
Page
1-16 p.
Notes
Contents: Publications of the Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada -- Reconstruction II / [H. Michell].
"To the discerning there is probably no question which gives rise to greater anxiety than the fear, arising practically to a certainty, that we shall be faced with a serious moral and spiritual reaction [after World War I ends]; in other words we shall be in for a very bad `slump' in high ideals, an expression which makes up in directness what it lacks in elegance (p. 3)".
"We are slowly, but only very slowly, and with infinite difficulty beginning to see that the forward movement of the future in all national and international polity must be preventive and not curative. Disease, poverty, misery, crime, must all be prevented. .... We have built hospitals enough in all conscience, but have we determinedly grappled with the causes that make people sick ? .... We must be seized with that divine discontent that will not let us rest while there are things to be done which cry out for us to set our hands to them, while there are wrongs to be righted that demand our courage to grapple with them, while there are crooked paths to be made straight, and captives to me set free. ..... But at this point we arrive at a very serious consideration. The pace of advancement, the desire for iconoclasm, the fury for reconstruction after the war is going to be very great. There will be a furious battle fought between extreme radicalism on the one side and extreme reaction on the other. To which party will the Church belong ? (pp. 11-13)". "It will be in these ways that the Church will find her great and God-inspired task for the future. She must stand between the combatants, the reactionaries and the radicals, and by the sweet reasonableness of her teaching show the way to a fuller realization of that righteousness which exalteth a nation" (p. 15).
Contents divided into sub-sections: Problems of Reconstruction: 4. Prohibition -- How To Meet Reaction -- Problems of Reconstruction: 5. Education -- Problems of Reconstruction: 6. Control of Disease -- The Legislation of the Future -- The New Outlook.
Bulletin appears to have been written by the Editor "H. Michell" based upon a footnote on page 7 which begins "Perhaps I may be forgiven for citing a personal instance" and which is signed "H.M."
Subjects
Canada - Social conditions - 1918-1930
World War, 1914-1918 - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and social problems - Anglican Church of Canada
Prohibition - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Liquor laws - Canada
Alcohol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Education - Canada
Education - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Religion in the public schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Public health - Canada
Public health - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.