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20 years of Indigenous partnerships

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38770
Author
Zarate, Jose
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Author
Zarate, Jose
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Page
1
Notes
"In 1996 PWRDF Executive Director Robin Gibson hired [Jose Zarate] to visit and consult with Indigenous communities with whom the Anglican Church had worked. These communities identified four areas as strategic ways in which PWRDF could come alongside: restoring language and culture; working with youth; empowering women, health and wellness; and inter-Indigenous networking. Our aim was to build a new partnership based on principles of trust, equal respect and the assurance that indigenous peoples would be the ones who identify the work -- the who, when, where, how and what they would like to accomplish. Later that year [1996] PWRDF hosted a face-to-face Indigenous partners gathering in Six Nations of the Grand River; Ohsweken, Ontario. Together with the 2011 Indigenous Partners Roundtable in Calgary, Alberta, these consultations have shaped our vision and activities".
Subjects
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Less detail

Aboriginal Anglicans get approval to form self-determining community within the church

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official22
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 9) -- The 300-member General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada has accepted and confirmed a covenant which encourages indigenous peoples to create a self-determining community within the church.
The covenant was drafted and signed by Aboriginal Anglicans at a gathering in Winnipeg last April.
Bishop Gordon Beardy of the Diocese of Keewatin, told Synod it is time for native people from across the country to begin a dialogue on what they mean by self determination and partnership within the Anglican Church. (Bishop Beardy is the second Aboriginal person elected bishop in the Canadian Anglican Church.)
Bishops James Cruickshank of the Diocese of Cariboo, said he was "deeply moved" by the desire of Aboriginal Anglicans to shape their future. "I believe one of the great promises of the Gospel is that we can be responsible for our own lives," he said. "What I hear our native brothers and sisters saying is that it is time for them to accept responsibility for their future and to move from a feeling of dependency on the church to a sense of independence."
Although one speaker expressed concern that native and non-native Anglicans would lose their connection if a self-determining Aboriginal church were created, most Synod members expressed overwhelming support for the covenant.
"We are letting go of something precious, but it may be necessary to let go so that we an receive each other back again in fullness," said Bishop Cruickshank. "I believe we will be a richer church for it."
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (623) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native Covenant
Covenants - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Across the Communion: Canada-U.S. co-operation benefits Cuba

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38387
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2013 May
Volume
139
Issue
5
Page
10
Notes
"A proposal to fund an office of integrated development for the Episcopal diocese of Cuba will be submitted for approval this April [2013] to a program review committee of the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF). The office will launch a three-year capacity-building project to train 25 community leaders annually, at the end of which they are expected to create a project proposal for their locality, said Adele Finney, executive director of PWRDF, the Anglican Church of Canada's relief and development agency. Fourteen projects will eventually be chosen for funding by the diocese. Episcopal Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF's counterpart in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church) is also expected to fund the office over a three-year period". "The diocese of Niagara has enjoyed a longstanding companion relationship with the Cuban diocese, Finney noted. Last August [2012], the diocese of Cuba's Bishop Griselda Delgado Del Carpio attended Sacred Circle, the triennial meeting of indigenous Anglicans in Canada. Delgado, herself an indigenous person from Bolivia, 'was profoundly moved by the circle, as were the people in her ministry', Finney said". Michael Thompson, General Secretary of the Anglican Church of Canada "said the relationship between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Cuban diocese is an example of 'faithful partnership in a global communion'. The relationship began when former primate Archbishop Ted Scott 'took an interest in how the Cuban church, separated from its province [the American Episcopal Church] by the economic blockade and travel restrictions could sustain a sense of participation in the wider Anglican Communion, Thompson said".
Subjects
Episcopal Church of Cuba
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Episcopal Church of Cuba
Episcopal Church of Cuba - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Episcopal Church of Cuba - Relations - Episcopal Church
Episcopal Church of Cuba - Relations - Anglican Communion
Episcopal Relief and Development (Episcopal Church)
Delgado de Carpio, Griselda, 1955-
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Church of Canada. Sacred Circle (7th : 2012 : Pinawa, Man.)
Less detail

A Brief prepared by The Anglican Church of Canada For submission to The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples At a Special Consultation between The Members of the Commission and Representatives of the Historic Mission Churches : Citadel Hotel, Ottawa, ON November 8-9, 1993

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog2063
Publication Date
1993
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
E 78 C2 A53 1993
Corporate Author
Anglican Church of Canada
Place
[Toronto ON
Publisher
Anglican Church of Canada]
Publication Date
1993
Physical_Description
[4], iii, 27 p. [+ 82 pp. of appendices] ; 28 x 21.5 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Coil binding.
"For Submission to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples At a Special Consultation between the Members of the Commission and Representatives of the Historic Mission Churches, Citadel Hotel, Ottawa, ON November 8-9, 1993".
"Brief prepared by: John Bird ... The Rev. Laverne Jacobs ... Terry Thompson ... Doug Tindal". -- title-page.
Contents: Table of Contents -- Executive Summary -- Full Circle: An Overview -- The Church's Historical Relationship -- A Change of Direction -- Residential Schools: Healing and Reconciliation -- Where Do We Go From Here ? -- Appendices.
Appendices: 1: Residential Schools: A Historic Overview -- 2: Anglican Church of Canada policy relating to Aboriginal peoples: 1959-1993 -- 3: Primate's apology to Aboriginal peoples for Anglican residential schools (with original press release and text of elder's acceptance) -- 4: Granting Criteria of the Residential Schools Working Group: 1992-1994 -- 5: Correspondence Between ARC Task Group on Residential Schools and Indian Affairs -- 6: Fifty-two recommendations submitted by the Aboriginal Rights Coalition to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples -- 7: Number of Aboriginal members of General Synod and its committees: 1980-1992.
Added Entry
Canada. Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Anglican Church of Canada. Residential Schools Working Group
Anglican Church of Canada. Council for Native Ministries
Anglican Submission to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Bird, John, 1953-
Jacobs, Laverne V.B. (Laverne Valentino Burton), 1942-
Thompson, Terry (Teresa) Reilly
Tindal, Doug, 1952-
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Indian residential schools - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Call Number
E 78 C2 A53 1993
Copies
2 copies
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Calls to Action: A roadmap for the journey

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38772
Author
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Author
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Under the Sun: News from the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund
Date
2016 February
Page
2
Notes
"The 94 Calls to Action from Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) have been described as a roadmap for the journey Canadians are taking together in renewing relationships with the First Nations, Inuit and Metis of this land". "Through the General Synod, the Anglican Foundation and PWRDF our Church is responding to these Calls to Action and they are front and centre in our work with other churches especially through KAIROS. PWRDF's work with Indigenous peoples was both affirmed and challenged to deepen through the Indigenous Roundtable of 2011. In the 2012-2015 strategic plan one of our priorities was exploring new ways of working with Canada's First Nations Peoples. This is also reflected in our current strategic plan 2015-2018 too deepen relationships with Indigenous peoples".
Subjects
Canada. Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Less detail

Council for Native Ministries

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official830
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 60
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 60
Mover
Rev. Dr. A. Cuthand
Seconder
Rev. P. Tait
Text
That this General Synod affirm Resolution Nos. 31 and 58 of the 1988 Lambeth Conference, as listed below, and refer them to the Program Committee for appropriate action.
"This Conference:
conscious of the work in many dioceses with deprived minorities in developed, affluent countries, such as native Americans and Canadians, Australian aborigines and Islanders, ethnic Koreans in Japan, and black urban communities in Britain, asks the relevant Anglican provinces to support work among such minorities who have difficulty in making their plight known in national and world forums.
supports all efforts being made for the procuring of land and civic rights for native indigenous people of the Americas specially in the light of the forthcoming celebrations of the 500th anniversary of the arrival of Columbus in the New World in 1992. CARRIED Act 60
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1988 - Resolutions
Minorities - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Minorities - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Columbus Quincentenary, 1992-1993 - Anglican Church of Canada
Columbus Quincentenary, 1992-1993 - Anglican Communion
Indians of North America - Canada - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada - Claims - Anglican Communion
Less detail

Distant dioceses form partnership

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article3771
Author
Korah, Susan
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 October
Author
Korah, Susan
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 October
Volume
116
Issue
8
Page
3
Notes
The dioceses of the Arctic in the Canadian north and of Carpentaria in Australia will enter into a partnership following a visit to Canada this summer by the Rt. Rev. Tony Hall-Matthews, Bishop of Carpentaria. Bishop Hall-Matthews said that the two dioceses have a great deal in common. Both have large aboriginal populations, are isolated, sparsely populated and financially supported by the national church. "`We both have a concern for indigenous leadership and are both working towards that,' Bishop Hall-Matthews said. `Two-thirds of our clergy are indigenous compared to 40 per cent in the Arctic'."
Subjects
Anglican Church of Australia. Diocese of Carpentaria
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Companion diocese program - Anglican Church of Canada
Companion diocese program - Anglican Church of Australia
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Australia
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Native clergy - Anglican Church of Australia
Hall-Matthews, Tony (Anthony Francis Berners), 1940-
Less detail

The Gospel Comes to North America

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35463
Author
MacDonald, Mark. L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2006 June
Author
MacDonald, Mark. L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2006 June
Volume
4
Issue
1
Page
95-101
Notes
"The title of this piece might suggest an essay about something that happened centuries ago. In fact, I want to describe something that is taking place now. Though it may seem absurd or amazing or both, it appears, at least from the perspective of the mainline church institutions that the Gospel is just now about to find its first real home in North America." "The influential Doctrine of Discovery, providing the basis for colonial expansion for over 500 years, presumes that civilization is not present if the institutions of western culture are not available. A land that is discovered without western institutions is considered "terra nullius", an uninhabited land, even if peoples and cultures are present". "Theologically, the Doctrine of Discovery has been the handmaid to the idolatrous assumption that God's presence has been confined to western civilization -- an idea that has all but destroyed the capacity of the major denominations to grow in indigenous communities". "Though colonialism limits the capacity of Westerners to see it, God's word has always had a vital and prophetic presence among the Peoples of the Land. In their diverse cultures and histories, we see constant suggestions of that presence, before, during, and after the arrival of the missionaries." "At the Sacred Circle of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples held in Pinawa, Man. [in August 2005], the first steps towards a church of the People of the Land of this Turtle Island (a number of tribes use this term to describe the Americas) were made. It is in this sense that I can say that we may be witnessing the birth of the first indigenous Anglican Church in North America -- a church that would hold that this land is sacred." "There is with these developments, a renewal of appreciation for the God-given authority that has always existed among the aboriginal nations. This authority, sometimes called sovereignty, is a direct repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery." "Aboriginal life -- true tribal life -- is ... a call to relational and interdependent identity with humanity and all of creation. This is a vision that is desperately needed by the peoples of our world". Bishop Macdonald outlines seven marks of a truly indigenous North America Church: "1. A robust awareness that God has, is, and will be present among the People of the Land. 2. A recognition that God has acted definitively in the survival of the Peoples of the Land .... 3. ... a related denunciation of the Doctrine of Discovery and an end to measuring aboriginal church development by Western models. 4. ... The churches of the West must do more than affirm the authority and validity of the First Nations as it relates to other Nations and States. They must recognize it among themselves. 5. The Spirit of God has and will develop leaders among the People of the Land. 6. The Land is sacred and a gift from God. We must recognize sacred place, history, and ecology. .... 7. The spiritual and moral authority of the aboriginal nations of the Americas, especially as they relate to their own, must shape the decision-making and the actual shape of these factors. This discernment must be both tribal and consensual, not imposed from above". "A Church for Turtle Island would call the whole Church to transformation. .... Once again, we would see that, perhaps more than anything else, the Gospel thrives on translation. Nothing is lost in translation; a new world is gained".
Author is Episcopal Bishop of Alaska and pastoral Bishop of Navajoland.
This article also published in Fall 2006 issue of "Ministry Matters", pp. 12-15.
Subjects
Doctrine of Discovery
Terra nullius
Self-determination, National
Colonialism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Colonialism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Christianity
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Anglican Church of Canada. National Indigenous Anglican Bishop
Native spirituality
Christianity and culture - Anglican Communion
Native peoples - Religion
Less detail

The Gospel comes to North America

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33811
Author
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Fall
Author
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Fall
Volume
13
Issue
3
Page
12-15
Notes
"The title of this piece might suggest an essay about something that happened centuries ago. In fact, I want to describe something that is taking place now. Though it may seem absurd or amazing or both, it appears, at least from the perspective of the mainline church institutions that the Gospel is just now about to find its first real home in North America." "The influential Doctrine of Discovery, providing the basis for colonial expansion for over 500 years, presumes that civilization is not present if the institutions of western culture are not available. A land that is discovered without western institutions is considered "terra nullius", an uninhabited land, even if peoples and cultures are present". "Theologically, the Doctrine of Discovery has been the handmaid to the idolatrous assumption that God's presence has been confined to western civilization -- an idea that has all but destroyed the capacity of the major denominations to grow in indigenous communities". "Though colonialism limits the capacity of Westerners to see it, God's word has always had a vital and prophetic presence among the Peoples of the Land. In their diverse cultures and histories, we see constant suggestions of that presence, before, during, and after the arrival of the missionaries." "At the Sacred Circle of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples held in Pinawa, Man. [in August 2005], the first steps towards a church of the People of the Land of this Turtle Island (a number of tribes use this term to describe the Americas) were made. It is in this sense that I can say that we may be witnessing the birth of the first indigenous Anglican Church in North America -- a church that would hold that this land is sacred." "There is with these developments, a renewal of appreciation for the God-given authority that has always existed among the aboriginal nations. This authority, sometimes called sovereignty, is a direct repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery." "Aboriginal life -- true tribal life -- is ... a call to relational and interdependent identity with humanity and all of creation. This is a vision that is desperately needed by the peoples of our world". Bishop Macdonald outlines seven marks of a truly indigenous North America Church: "1. A robust awareness that God has, is, and will be present among the People of the Land. 2. A recognition that God has acted definitively in the survival of the Peoples of the Land .... 3. ... a related denunciation of the Doctrine of Discovery and an end to measuring aboriginal church development by Western models. 4. ... The churches of the West must do more than affirm the authority and validity of the First Nations as it relates to other Nations and States. They must recognize it among themselves. 5. The Spirit of God has and will develop leaders among the People of the Land. 6. The Land is sacred and a gift from God. We must recognize sacred place, history, and ecology. .... 7. The spiritual and moral authority of the aboriginal nations of the Americas, especially as they relate to their own, must shape the decision-making and the actual shape of these factors. This discernment must be both tribal and consensual, not imposed from above". "A Church for Turtle Island would call the whole Church to transformation. .... Once again, we would see that, perhaps more than anything else, the Gospel thrives on translation. Nothing is lost in translation; a new world is gained".
Author is Episcopal Bishop of Alaska and pastoral Bishop of Navajoland.
This article also published in June 2006 issue (vol. 4, no. 1) of "First Peoples Theology Journal", pp. 95-101.
Subjects
Doctrine of Discovery
Terra nullius
Self-determination, National
Colonialism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Colonialism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Christianity
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Indigenous Bishop
Native spirituality
Christianity and culture - Anglican Communion
Native peoples - Religion
Less detail

Hiltz rallies support for UN Declaration

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39701
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 May
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 May
Volume
142
Issue
5
Page
1, 13
Notes
"'Let your "yes" be yes', said Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, quoting James 5:12 as silence descended over the congregation gathered March 19 [2016] at Her Majesty's Royal Chapel of the Mohawks [in Brantford, Ont.]. 'This strikes me as good counsel for the church of our days, as it seeks to act on decisions made at General Synod 2010 repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery and endorsing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples [UNDRIP]', said Hiltz. 'Here we have a call to let our "yes" in that historic moment be a resounding and continuing "yes"' (p. 1). Archbishop Hiltz spoke "in response to the 48th of the 94 Calls to Action released following the close of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in June 2015, requiring, among other things, that religious denominations and faith groups in Canada issue a statement no later than March 31, 2016 'as to how they will implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples" (p. 1). "In order to ensure that the church continues to 'comply with the principles, norms and standards of the U.N. Declaration', Hiltz announced that, in consultation with the National Indigenous Bishop Mark MacDonald and General Secretary Archdeacon Michael Thompson, he would commission a Council of Elders and Youth to monitor the church's commitment to the declaration. But in order for such changes to gain traction in the church, Hiltz acknowledged that they would need to be adopted by the bishops." (p. 13). "The need for a more general buy-in from across the church was a point stressed by Donna Bomberry, former Indigenous ministries co-ordinator for General Synod, secretary general of the Anglican Indigenous Network and Cayuga nation member" (p. 13).
Subjects
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Canada. Truth and Reconciliation Commission
United Nations. General Assembly. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bomberry, Donna
Bennett, Robert F. (Robert Franklin), 1949-
Bird, Michael A. (Michael Allan), 1957-
Casey, Norm
Less detail

43 records – page 1 of 5.