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"Because it was there" : Into Canada's North (1944-1950)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog2146
Author
Hubbert, Mildred Young, 1924-1997
Publication Date
c1993
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
U. of T. Libraries
Call Number
F 5918 H83 1993
Author
Hubbert, Mildred Young, 1924-1997
Place
Markdale ON
Publisher
[s.n.]
Publication Date
c1993
Physical_Description
vi, 118 p. : ill. ; 28 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[B]y Mildred Young Hubbert".
"This book may be purchased by writing to: Box 599, Markdale, Ontario N0C 1H0". -- verso of t.-p.
"Printed at: Stan Brown Printers Limited, Owen Sound, Ontario". -- verso of t.-p.
Bibliography: p. 110.
"This is a very personal account of what it was like to live in Canada's North in the middle of the 20th Century. The writer was twenty years old, and the Unknown beckoned. .... But this is not a definitive history. The story that follows describes the North through youthful eyes: the Indian Residential Schools at Carcross, Y.T. and at Moose Factory, and the booming mining town of Yellowknife, N.W.T. It is as accurate as the writer can make it, with apologies for any memories that may have been clouded by the years. Most of the names are valid, but there are instances where they have may been changed to avoid embarrassment to those who shared the stresses of isolation, or to their families". -- Preface.
Map on front endpapers. Photograph on back endpapers.
Contents: Over the Trail of '98 -- When Two Cultures Meet -- The Making of a Sourdough -- To the Bottom of the Bay -- Winter Closes In -- Christmas on the Bay -- On the Edge of History -- The Halls of Higher Learning -- Into Hard Rock Country -- A Town Built on Gold -- Full Circle -- Appendix.
Biographical memoir of the author's life and teaching experience in the Carcross Indian Residential School in Carcross, Yukon, the Bishop Horden Memorial School at Moose Factory, Ontario and a public school in Yellowknife NWT.
Subjects
Hubbert, Mildred Young
Canada, Northern - Social life and customs
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Teachers - Canada - Biography
Chooutla Indian Residential School (Carcross, Yukon)
Bishop Horden Memorial School (Moose Factory, Ont.)
ISBN
0-9697380-0-5
Call Number
F 5918 H83 1993
Location
General Synod Archives
U. of T. Libraries
Less detail

"In loco parentis" : G.H. Raley and a Residential School Philosophy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article37668
Author
Raibman, Roberta*
Raibmon, Paige Sylvia, 1971-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1996 April
Author
Raibman, Roberta*
Raibmon, Paige Sylvia, 1971-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1996 April
Volume
38
Issue
1
Page
[29]-52
Notes
"[E]ven as we continue to learn more about the experiences of those who attended residential schools, we seem to move further away from an understanding of the experiences and motives of the teachers and principals who ran the schools. These figures often appeared as stereotyped caricatures, when they are considered at all. If we are to understand the historical phenomenon of the residential school system, however, an understanding of the varied goals and intentions of residential school staff is essential. By disregarding these figures we lose sight of the important fact that, just as we perceive our own cultural values and beliefs to be rational, coherent and correct, so did historical figures view their contemporary value systems. In this light, an analysis of the work of the Reverend Dr. George Henry Raley, principal of Coqualeetza Residential School at Sardis, British Columbia, in the Fraser Valley, from 1914 until 1934 is particularly interesting. From the outset, Raley appears worthy of deeper investigation because of the extraordinary fondness with which he is remembered by ex-students" (p. [29]). "One of the central tenets of Raley's philosophy was the unique meaning he gave to the concept of paternal responsibility. One of his primary goals at Coqualeetza was to neutralize the institutional atmosphere by transforming the school into a home and the staff and students into a family" (p. 33). "Such evidence of a familial atmosphere is all the more remarkable when one considers that with over two-hundred students, Coqualeetza was the largest Protestant residential school in Canada" (p. 34). "Raley's 'paternalism' took the form of this positive exception because it was founded on a concept of responsibility quite different from that of the stereotypical evangelical educator. Raley's 'paternalistic responsibility' included an appreciation for First Nations culture and values. In his speeches and writings, he emphasized the positive internal education and moral structures of Indian education and society" (p. 36). "The academic accomplishments at Coqualeetza are impressive, particularly for a residential school. .... And, when, in 1925, Coqualeetza became the first residential school in Canada to teach grade nine, Raley broke with the otherwise ubiquitous half-day system, and provided senior students with a full day of instruction. Raley also emphasized manual training classes, which he hoped would provide students with practical life skills. ... Since many of the students came from fishing villages along the Northwest Coast, Raley initiated boat building classes as part of the manual training program. Most significant for Raley, in terms of practical skills for his students, however, were the programs instructing the children in traditional Indian carving and basket weaving. He believed that such classes could serve the two-fold aim of providing practical vocational skills, and helping the children maintain their culture" (p. 37). "Raley's attempt to foster traditional Native art amongst his students was part of a comprehensive, long-term plan which envisioned 'Indian art and industries' as the solution to a much larger social problem" (p. 38). "Raley's bid to generate a new understanding of Native culture by Canadian society was motivated to a significant degree by the racism which he perceived around him. He was highly conscious of the devastating effects of racism had had on the First Nations people in Canada" (p. 41). "Raley wanted the Canadian public to acknowledge First Nations culture as 'a culture which is distinctly Canadian' and Indian art as 'Canada's first contribution to the world of art'. This was a sincere attempt to lessen the perception of the Indian as 'other'. This inclusive attitude, which characterized First Nations people as the first Canadians, was exceptional for its time, and indeed remains so in our own" (p. 43). "[Paulo] Freire's model [in his 'Pedagogy of the Oppressed'] reveals that the fundamental limitation of Raley's approach was his belief that the 'White' community could give dignity and self-respect back to First Nations people. Such an approach perpetuates the power relations which characterize the oppressor-oppressed relationship, since the 'lesser' party remains in the 'lesser' position. Liberation and the restoration of self-respect hinge on a renegotiation of power relations and the establishment of a dialogical relationship" (p. 44).
Article divided into sections: Curricular Innovations -- Beyond the Residential Schools -- Conclusion -- Notes.
"This article has been derived from a University of British Columbia honours thesis entitled 'A New Understanding of the Residential School Experience' which is available at the U.B.C. Library, Special Collections Division" (p. 46).
*N.B. Author's name is given on page [1] of Contents page as "Paige Raibman" and on page 44 as "ROBERTA Raibman, Duke University". Author's correct name is Paige Raibmon.
Subjects
Raley, George Henry, 1864-1958
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - United Church of Canada
Coqualeetza Residential School (Sardis, B.C.)
Christianity and culture - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Archives
Racism - Canada
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Residential Schools Staff

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8920
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 39
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 39
Mover
Archbishop John Clarke
Seconder
Bishop Duncan Wallace
Prologue
Archbishop John Clarke introduced Ms. Bernice Logan, a former residential schools staff member, who addressed Synod and showed a video of a ten-day trip to Switzerland made by a hockey club from one of the residential schools. Archbishop Clarke said that the majority of staff members were not abusers and Synod had afforded the opportunity to ensure them a place in the history of the church.
Text
That this General Synod recognize and acknowledge the personal sacrifice and dedication of the great majority of the teachers, supervisors and support staff who, with integrity and honour devoted so much of their lives to the education and care of the aboriginal children in the Residential Schools of Canada.
Rev. Andrew Wesley, a survivor of abuse, came forward and embrace Ms. Logan. He said he had been on a journey of forgiveness and encouraged his aboriginal people to do the same. Synod stood in acknowledgement.
Friendly Amendment
The mover and seconder agreed to add the words "including aboriginal peoples" after the words "support staff".
The amended resolution reads -
That this General Synod recognize and acknowledge the personal sacrifice and dedication of the great majority of the teachers, supervisors and support staff including aboriginal peoples who, with integrity and honour devoted so much of their lives to the education and care of the aboriginal children in the Residential Schools of Canada.
The amended resolution was put and CARRIED Act 39
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Wesley, Andrew
Logan, Bernice (Ruth Bernice), 1931-2022
Less detail

The Teaching Wigwams

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog2055
Author
Logan, Bernice (Ruth Bernice), 1931-2022
Publication Date
1993-1994
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
E 96.2 L63 1993
Author
Logan, Bernice (Ruth Bernice), 1931-2022
Edition
1st ed.
Place
[Tangier NS
Publisher
Author]
Publication Date
1993-1994
Physical_Description
2 vols.: vol. 1, pt. pp. 1-549; vol. 1, pt. 2, pp. 550-790, [4], [198], [42], [32], [12], [12], [32]; vol. 2, [388] pp., incl. appendices : illus. (some col.)
Material Type
Book
Notes
Published as two volumes. Vol. 1 [i.e. "Book One"] published in two parts [i.e. "Volume 1 & 2"] with publication date of 1994. Vol. 2 [i.e. "Book 2"] with publication date of 1993 [sic].
Vol. 2 consists of [10] pp. of introductory text, followed by pages of reproduced photographs (bl. & w., some col.).
"[B]y R. Bernice Logan". -- title-page. vol.1, pt. 1.
Compiled by R. Bernice Logan with the assistance of Noreen V. Kilcommons [see last 3 leaves of "Book One - Volume Two"].
Includes bibliographical references.
Text includes numerous photocopies of newsletters, curriculum material, drawings and other ephemera related to schools, students and staff.
"In 1991 I saw the movie 'Where the Spirit Lives' on CBC-TV. I was shocked at such a portrayal of life in the Indian residential schools. As a young woman in 1949 I had travelled to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, to begin work as a missionary at All Saints' School, and there was no similarity between the experiences I had there and what was shown in this movie." -- Intro., p. 1.
Contents: Introduction -- What the Textbooks Taught Us: Lessons of the Past -- One Little Indian Boy -- Memories of the Children -- Memories of the Missionaries -- The Shingwauk Reunion, 1991 -- Shubenacadie -- A Sense of History -- The Teaching Wigwams -- On the Homefront -- "the haughty, arrogant man he really was" -- The Stuff of Which Missionaries are Made -- Conclusion -- Appendices.
R. Bernice Logan, nee Mason, worked at All Saints' Indian Residential School in Prince Albert, Sask. and Shingwauk Indian Residential School in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. before her marriage in 1958 to Anglican cleric W.H. Logan.
Noreen V. Kilcommons, nee Mason [sister of Bernice Logan], worked before and after her marriage at Shingwauk Indian Residential School, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., St. Cyprian's Indian Residential School in Brocket, Alb., Edmonton Indian Residential School, Glenevis Indian Day School, Opitsaht Indian Day School and Brocket Indian Day School.
Added Entry
Kilcommons, Noreen V.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Catholic Church
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Education
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Employees
ISBN
0-9697896-0-2 ("Book One")
0-9697896-0-1 ("Book Two")
Call Number
E 96.2 L63 1993
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

(xxviii) Committee on Native Canadians

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8585
Date
1967 August 15-18
Source
House of Bishops Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1967 August 15-18
Source
House of Bishops Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Quebec
Seconder
Bishop of Moosonee
Prologue
The Bishop of Quebec, as Chairman of the Committee on Native Canadians, presented a report. The report will be found as Appendix C to these Minutes
The most pressing need in the Dioceses in the Civil Provinces of Ontario and Quebec where work is done among native people, is for Anglican teachers for day and residential schools. The proper channel by which the needs of the Dioceses and the personnel available in other Dioceses are brought together is the Personnel Division of M.S.C.C. This channel has apparently not been in effective use.
The suggestion was made that recruits for this work are still obtainable in England.
Text
"That the report of the House of Bishops' Committee on Native Canadians be received."
Notes
APPENDIX C
HOUSE OF BISHOPS COMMITTEE ON NATIVE CANADIANS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1966 to MAY 1967
Your Committee on Native Canadians, under the Chairmanship of the Bishop of Quebec, respectfully submits the following report:
Meetings -- Three meetings of the Committee have been held, at the time of the Quarterly Meetings in November 1966 and in February and May 1967.
ACTION TAKEN BY THE COMMITTEE
1. Following a presentation by the Bishops of Keewatin to the Committee on the plight of Indians who move to urban communities and who lack the means of obtaining a down payment and a mortgage loan on a suitable residence, the Chairman wrote to the Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources to enquire whether Government assistance might be provided to meet this need.
A reply was received from Mr. R.F. Battle, Assistant Deputy Minister, Indian Affairs, as follows:
Ottawa 4, June 19, 1967.
The Right Reverend R.F. Brown,
Bishop of Quebec,
Bishopthorpe,
69 d'Auteuil,
Quebec 4, P.Q.
Dear Bishop Brown:
In answer to your enquiry of January 6, 1967, I advised you on January 19, that the administrative details of a program of 'Conditional Grants' for the establishment of Indian families off reserves, to provide housing assistance comparable to that granted Indians on reserves, would be announced soon.
The Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, the Honourable Arthur Laing, announced the details of the Off Reserve Housing Program in the House of Commons on May 16, 1967.
I promised to write to you again when the details had been worked out and I am attaching for your information a copy of the Minister's release after announcing the program now in effect.
Yours sincerely,
(Signed)
R.F. Battle,
Assistant Deputy Minister,
(Indian Affairs).
2. MISSIONARY BISHOP'S [sic] CONFERENCE
The Committee received the report and resolutions from the M.S.C.C. Missionary Bishop's [sic] Conference at Aurora in November, 1966.
3. INTER-CHURCH INSTITUTE IN WINNIPEG -- June 12-22, 1967
The Committee received a report from the Bishop of Keewatin on the proposed Inter-Church Institute, to be held in Winnipeg, June 12-22, 1967 for those involved in full-time ministry among Indian and Metis peoples. Some financial support and participation had been arranged with the General Synod inter-departmental Committee on Indian and Eskimo Work.
4. INDIAN EDUCATION IN NORTHERN QUEBEC
The Bishop of Moosonee reported his concern for the fact that a French Roman Catholic Curriculum had been introduced in the Federal Day School at Rupert's House in addition to the Provincial English Protestant Curriculum.
The Secretary of the Committee was subsequently able to arrange a conference at Church House between the Bishop of Moosonee and Messrs. R.F. Davey and Paul Deziel of Indian Affairs Education, Ottawa, with members of M.S.C.C. staff in attendance; to present our concerns about this situation, which had resulted in the Indians of the East Coast of James' Bay sending a protesting Brief to the Prime Minister, Mr. Diefenbaker and Mr. Douglas.
A statement of protest was also sent to the Hon. Arthur Laing by the Bishop of Moosonee on February 28, and letters of protest were sent by the Bishop of Quebec, Chairman of the House of Bishops' Committee, following the May meeting of the Committee, to the Hon. Arthur Laing, to the Minister of Education for the Province of Quebec and to Cardinal Roy.
THE FUTURE OF THIS COMMITTEE
We recommend that this House of Bishops' Committee on Native Canadians be made a Standing Committee of the House of Bishops; to meet at the call of the Chairman, at least once annually.
Respectfully submitted,
The Rt. Rev. R.F. Brown, (Chairman),
The Rev. Canon T.E. Jones, (Secretary).
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops. Committee on Native Canadians
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Catholic Church
Indigenous peoples - Quebec (Province) - Residential schools
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Employees
Missionary Society of the Anglican Church of Canada (M.S.C.C.). Personnel Division
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Urban residence
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Education
Teachers - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Housing
Less detail