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Aboriginal sexual offending in Canada

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog4225
Author
Hylton, John H., 1950-
Publication Date
c2002
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
HQ 72 C2H9 2002
Author
Hylton, John H., 1950-
Place
Ottawa ON
Publisher
Aboriginal Healing Foundation
Publication Date
c2002
Physical_Description
iii, 228 p. ; 28 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Prepared for The Aboriginal Healing Foundation By Dr. John H. Hylton With the Assistance of: Murray Bird, Nicole Eddy, Heather Sinclair, Heather Stenerson".
Includes bibliographical references.
"Between 20 % and 25 % of convicted sexual offenders in Canada are Aboriginal. As with non-Aboriginal offenders, those who have been convicted are the tip of the ice berg. While precise numbers are not available, there may be as many as 150,000 Aboriginal sex offenders in Canada." -- Executive Summary, p. i.
"This report is about Aboriginal sexual offending in Canada. The incidence of Aboriginal sexual offending is examined, trends over recent years are reviewed, current prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and healing approaches are analyzed, and gaps in current services are enumerated. In the final chapter, we present a strategic framework for addressing Aboriginal sexual offending in Canada. At the outset, we wish to locate current issues about Aboriginal sexual offending in their proper historical context. For this reason, we take the opportunity in this introductory chapter to discuss sexuality in traditional Aboriginal societies, as well as the impact that colonization has on age-old Aboriginal practices and beliefs. We believe the disruption of traditional beliefs and practices, including the harm brought about by residential schools has in no small part been responsible for creating the social economic and political conditions that account for high levels of sexual abuse in many Aboriginal communities today." -- Chapter 1, p. 1.
Contents include chapter "Sexual Abuse and the Legacy of Residential Schools".
Contents: Executive Summary -- Acknowledgements -- Sexual Abuse and the Legacy of Residential Schools -- Aboriginal People and the Justice System -- Aboriginal Sexual Offending -- Strategies for Addressing Aboriginal Offending -- The Treatment of Sexual Offenders -- A Strategic Framework for Addressing Aboriginal Sexual Offending -- Appendix A: Program Profiles, Sex Offender Treatment Programs -- B: Crime and Sexual Offending in Canada.
Series
Aboriginal Healing Foundation research series
Added Entry
Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Canada)
Aboriginal Sex Offending in Canada
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Sexual behavior
Sexual abuse - Canada
Sex crimes - Canada
Indigenous criminals - Rehabilitation - Canada
Sex offenders - Rehabilitation - Canada
ISBN
0-9684653-6-6
Call Number
HQ 72 C2H9 2002
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Addictive behaviours among Aboriginal people in Canada

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6898
Author
Chansonneuve, Deborah
Publication Date
2007
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
RC 564.67 C2 C53 2007
Author
Chansonneuve, Deborah
Place
Ottawa ON
Publisher
Aboriginal Healing Foundation
Publication Date
2007
Physical_Description
iii, 122 p. : ill. (incl. tables, some col.) ; 28 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Prepared for The Aboriginal Healing Foundation By Deborah Chansonneuve."
Includes bibliographical references, p. 101-116.
"Increasingly, evidence shows the most effective addictions prevention and intervention programming for Aboriginal people is grounded in the wisdom of traditional Inuit, Metis, and First Nation teachings about a holistic approach to a healthy life. Aboriginal belief systems have much to teach about a broader approach to recovery because they emphasize: that all aspects of well-being are equally important and interconnected, including the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual; that balanced well-being is throughout the lifespan; and that individual health is an aspect of the health of families, communities, nations, and the environment. In the context of addictive behaviours, an Aboriginal approach begins with the premise that each of these three areas must be addressed in order to sustain improvements over the long term. 'Good Medicine' is what strengthens the mind, body, heart, and spirit. Stories of healing strengthen and inspire those who hear them; these stories are the 'Good Medicine' of the healing movement". -- Intro.
Contents: Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Looking Back to Move Forward -- Addictive Behaviours and Residential School Abuse -- Using the Wisdom of Culture to Promote Healing -- Five Stories of Hope --Promising Practices in Addictions Prevention and Intervention -- Conclusion and Continuation of the Journey -- Appendix A: Fact Sheets -- Appendix B: List of Key Informants -- Appendix C: Annotated Bibliography -- References.
Pages 117-122 are blank pages headed "Notes".
Series
Aboriginal Healing Foundation research series
Added Entry
Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Canada)
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Substance use - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Substance use - Canada - Prevention
Indigenous peoples - Substance use - Treatment - Canada
Substance use - Treatment - Canada
Compulsive behavior - Treatment - Canada
Spiritual healing - Canada
Healing
Indigenous philosophy - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
ISBN
978-1-897285-37-4 (print version)
Call Number
RC 564.67 C2 C53 2007
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

The Agreement in brief 2006

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog5237
Publication Date
2006
Material Type
Brochure
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
BX 5607 A37 2006
Corporate Author
Anglican Church of Canada
Place
Toronto ON
Publisher
General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada
Publication Date
2006
Physical_Description
11 p. ; 21.5 x 9.2 cm.
Material Type
Brochure
Notes
Cover title.
"April 2006" -- p. [2].
"For three years now, we, the Anglican Church of Canada, have had an agreement with the federal government covering lawsuits about Indian residential schools that, until not that long ago, threatened our very existence. What that agreement did was limit our liability to $25 million. A Settlement Fund was created and we, General Synod and each of the 30 dioceses, agreed to raise $25 million over five years for the fund .... The 2003 agreement was imperfect (p. 3). .... The new agreement is still an agreement in principle. The process for all the bodies that need to give the new agreement their blessing is going to take a while and until that process is complete, we must continue to make payments to the Settlement Fund under the terms of the 2003 agreement. The silver lining here, though, is that these payments are money that will be refunded into our Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation, once the 2006 agreement comes into force -- we hope by the end of the year (p. 10)."
Contents: Where are we ? -- First things first -- So what happened to bring about this new agreement ? -- ... and so -- A renewed commitment.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Canada. Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA)
Settlement Fund
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Fund for Healing and Reconciliation
Call Number
BX 5607 A37 2006
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Anglican Church boosts Indigenous Healing funds, cuts other programs and staff in financial squeeze

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7483
Date
2000 August 14
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2000 August 14
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, Monday, August 14, 2000 -- The Anglican Church will cut more than half a million dollars in grants to support ministry in Canada's north and overseas, and eliminate eight full time positions at its national office.
At the same time, grants available from the church's Healing and Reconciliation Fund, supporting work with Indigenous peoples, will double.
The reductions, amounting to about 11 percent of the church's $10.9 million national budget, respond to continuing financial pressure from the cost of litigation related to residential schools.
The impact of the reductions will be felt around the world. Grants to support ministry across Canada's north will decline by about $125,000 in 2000, with a further $130,000 reduction recommended for 2001. Similar grants to programs in the Third World will decline by almost $400,000.
"With these reductions we will balance our operating expenditures in the current year," said Archdeacon Jim Boyles, the church's general secretary, "but our assets will continue to be depleted to pay for our litigation costs."
The church's General Synod (its national structure) and eight of its 30 independent dioceses, or regions, are named in about 350 suits for cultural, physical and sexual abuse at the schools. In some cases the church is named directly, in others it has been brought into the suit as a third party by the Government of Canada, which is also being sued.
The residential schools operated into the 1980s under government control. Churches, including the Anglican, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic and United Churches, participated in operating the schools until 1969.
Archdeacon Boyles said the church is continuing to urge the Government of Canada to stop pursuing lawsuits as its primary response to the more than 7,000 individuals who are seeking compensation. "We agree with the Law Commission of Canada that a redress mechanism would offer a better means of meeting the needs of people who were harmed in the schools," he said.
"We have told the government that we could make a substantial commitment, both financially and in other ways, to support such a redress program". There has been no response from government, he said".
The church committed itself to a new relationship with Indigenous people in 1969, when its involvement in the residential schools ended. It established its Healing and Reconciliation Fund in 1991, after hearing reports of abuses in the schools. In 1993, Archbishop Michael Peers gave an apology on behalf of the church for its participation in the schools.
The Healing and Reconciliation Fund is administered by the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples. It provides grants in support of community-based healing initiatives for Indigenous groups. Since its inception, the fund has provided about $600,000 to assist with 60 healing projects. Financial support for Indigenous ministries, including the work of the Council and the Healing Fund, will increase from $262,000 to $547,000 annually.
The continuing drain of litigation costs and other factors have lead to the current reductions. Other impacts include:
- reduction of work in environmental and social justice areas, and reduction of support for a number of inter-church coalitions working in these areas
- reduction in the number of pages in the national newspaper, the `Anglican Journal'
- elimination of the national Resource Centre, which provided loans of videos and other resources to support parish ministries.
Ten staff positions have been eliminated at the church's national office, but two new ones have been created, leaving a net reduction of eight full time positions. Those affected have been provided with a severance package and relocation assistance, Archdeacon Boyles said. The staff reductions are effective immediately; grant reductions will come into full effect in 2001, if the church's national executive committee approves the proposed budget.
A complete report on the reductions is available at www.anglican.ca/church.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Archdeacon Jim Boyles, 416-924-9199 ext. 280
Related information:
Residential Schools, Legacy and Hope (`Ministry Matters' special edition), http://www.anglican.ca/mm/2000/legacy/
Healing and Reconciliation Fund, http://www.anglican.ca/ministry/healing/
Other resources related to the Residential schools, http://www.anglican.ca/ministry/rs/
`Restoring Dignity': Report of the Law Commission of Canada, www.lcc.gc.ca/
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence); During May 4-7. 416-540-3653 www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - Employees
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Third parties (Law) - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Healing and Reconciliation Fund
Less detail

Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples' Press Statement

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8241
Date
2003 March 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2003 March 11
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
[TORONTO (Mar. 11, 2003)]
"If, however, the watchman sees the enemy coming and does not sound the alarm, the enemy will come and kill those sinners, but I will hold the watchmen responsible for their death." (Ezekiel 33:6)
On March 10th [2003], after prayerful consideration, we, as members of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples, met with Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, to urge him not to sign the Settlement Agreement between the Anglican Church and the Government of Canada until changes were made to prevent re-victimization of survivors and promote true healing and restoration.
At our meeting from March 6 to 9th, 2003, we reviewed the Settlement Agreement for the first time as a Council. We shared in the Circle our fears and pain concerning the contents of the Agreement and its implications for Indigenous peoples. In essence, we fear that the Agreement and its related documents will have damaging effects upon survivors and their descendants.
We oppose the requirement of survivors to waive all future claims for loss of language and culture in order to gain a settlement for physical and sexual abuse -- a requirement which we understand to be an extinguishment of our Aboriginal rights to our languages, cultures, and traditions. We are appalled by the torturous nature of the Alternative Dispute Resolution process that is currently being drafted by the Federal government, in consultation with the Anglican Church, and fear that such a process will further violate survivors while offering most of them very little compensation in return.
We believe that the effects of the Agreement and its related documents have not been widely discussed or understood in the wider Church due to the lack of meaningful consultation with ACIP [Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples], as well as the rushed timeframe of discussions within the dioceses and their overwhelming focus on the financial aspects of the Agreement.
All of these concerns we have expressed to the Primate, as well as to other leaders of the National church. We are deeply saddened by the fact that these concerns have not been deemed sufficient to warrant a delay in the signing of the Agreement.
In 1994, representatives of our people signed a Covenant in which we agreed to call our people into unity in a new, self-determining community within the Anglican Church of Canada. At that time, we extended the hand of partnership to all those of the broader church who would help us build a truly Anglican Indigenous Church in Canada. In 1995, the General Synod of the Anglican Church accepted that extended hand and pledged to walk in partnership with us.
It is with heavy hearts that we declare that neither the content of the Settlement Agreement itself nor the process by which it has been negotiated reflects that covenant of partnership. Our responsibility now, as representatives of Indigenous Anglicans from across the country, is to inform our people of the pitfalls of the Agreement, and to warn them of the dangers of the Alternative Dispute Resolution process.
As the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples, we want to declare that on March 11th [2003], when the Settlement Agreement is signed and made official by the Primate on behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, he will not be doing so in our name.
- 30 -
Contact: Andrew Wesley, ACIP Co-chair 416-922-3871 or 416-504-9416; Todd Russell, ACIP Co-chair 709-896-1377 or 709-896-0592; Maria Jane Highway, ACIP Member 205-627-0015 or 205-623-3311
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Settlement Agreement
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Anglican diocese ponders uncertain future, as government lawsuits drain assets

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7562
Date
2000 October 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2000 October 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
QUESNEL, Friday, October 13, 2000 -- What may be the final synod, or annual meeting, of the Diocese of Cariboo began this afternoon in the usual way, with worship.
Approximately 85 members of the diocese represent its 17 parishes, which stretch along the Fraser and Thompson Rivers from Merritt to Prince George. Over the next three days, gathered in a community recreation center in Quesnel, they will consider the unprecedented possibility of winding up the diocese as a result of lawsuits arising from abuse that took place more than 30 years ago at St. George's School, Lytton.
St. George's was founded by the New England Company, an independent mission agency based in England, and eventually sold to the Government of Canada. Under the terms of the sale, the Bishop of Cariboo could nominate an Anglican priest as principal. The federal department of Indian Affairs had authority to accept or reject this nomination. The government operated St. George's until the early 1970s.
Derek Clarke, a former dormitory supervisor at St. George's, has been convicted of sexual abuse. Following the conviction a number of Clarke's victims launched lawsuits for damages against the Government of Canada and, in some cases, against the church.
Only one case has come to judgment, and it is now under appeal. The Diocese of Cariboo is a defendant in an additional 14 cases. Twelve of these cases are third-party actions brought by the federal Department of Justice. According to the audited financial statements to be presented to this synod, Cariboo's legal fees in respect of these actions totaled approximately $350,000 from 1998 until August 2, 2000 (the date of the Auditor's report).
The diocese has informed the court that it can no longer afford to be represented in the continuing legal actions.
During the opening session of the synod, Indigenous members of the diocese enacted a story "jumping off the cradle board", representing the way in which Indigenous peoples are restricted by poverty and cultural loss. The play generated a deep emotional response as all members of the synod eventually became drawn into "freeing" a young person who had been symbolically bound.
Earlier, in the opening worship, Archbishop David Crawley drew a parallel between the Diocese of Cariboo, facing possible bankruptcy, and the biblical story of the people of Israel, crossing the wilderness. "Crossing the wilderness is a common theme in the Old Testament," Archbishop Crawley said. It was in the wilderness that the people had their most direct encounters with God.
"If it is true that our church is entering a wilderness, will we also encounter God ? The answer depends on whether we make [the] same mistakes the Israelites made," Archbishop Crawley said. "If we rebuild the temple for our own purposes, and turn it into a kind of club, then we will not meet God and all our building will be in vain. But if we understand that we are going through the wilderness in order to rebuild ourselves as a place of service, a center of reconciliation, then we will meet God."
This evening the diocesan Chancellor, Bud Smith, is scheduled to give the synod an overview of its legal and financial situation. He will present three resolutions (which will be discussed beginning Saturday morning) intended to give the bishop and diocesan executive the ability to respond to changing circumstances over the next few months.
One authorizes the bishop and executive to formally wind up the affairs of the diocese during the next 12 months. Another would allow the diocese to negotiate a settlement with the Government of Canada "provided that any such proposal must be sustainable from resources within the Diocese of Cariboo or its successor and must be of direct benefit to victims of abuse at St. George's Residential School."
The third authorizes the use of an arbitration procedure between the diocese and the government to determine whether parish buildings are owned by the diocese or held in trust for the parish. Government lawyers have claimed that parish buildings are assets of the diocese and should be turned over to the government.
The Right Reverend James Cruickshank, bishop of the diocese since 1992, will give "he bishop's charge" Saturday morning. The synod continues through Saturday afternoon.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Rt. Rev. Jim Cruickshank, Bishop of Cariboo 250-376-0112; Most Rev. David Crawley, Archbishop of Kootenay and Metropolitan of British Columbia and Yukon 250-762-3306; During the Synod, Bishop Cruickshank and Archbishop Crawley may be reached care of Doug Tindal, 416-540-3653
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence); www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
St. George's Indian Residential School (Lytton, B.C.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo - Finance
Bankruptcy - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Third parties (Law) - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglicans asked to contact MPs seeking fair resolution of residential schools claims

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7557
Date
2000 September 21
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2000 September 21
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, September 21, 2000 -- The Anglican Church of Canada has asked its members to write their Members of Parliament seeking a new approach to the legacy of residential schools.
More than 6,000 Indigenous persons are suing Canada because of their experiences in the schools, which operated from the 1800s until the 1980s. "To date, the government's only response has been through adversarial legal processes managed by the Department of Justice," said Archdeacon Jim Boyles, the church's General Secretary. "Legal costs are skyrocketing and very few people are being compensated".
In a letter to all Anglican parishes, Archdeacon Boyles wrote: Today, the problems arising out of the residential schools endanger the national and international ministry of our church, not primarily because of the people who suffered abuse and are seeking fair compensation, but because of legal actions launched by Canada's Department of Justice, and because, so far, our government has chosen to respond to this national crisis only through the courts and similar legal processes."
The Anglican Church of Canada, which assisted in the operation of about 26 of more than 80 schools, is involved with about 1600 of these suits. In many cases, the church is involved only because the Department of Justice has added the church as a third party. The church has said that legal costs could bankrupt the General Synod as early as next year.
The letter continues: "We believe with all our hearts that we can play a significant role in healing the broken relationships with Indigenous people. We stand by our Primate's apology from 1993; we accept our responsibility for the part we played in the schools, and we are prepared to commit substantial human and financial resources to assist with healing and reconciliation into the future."
Archdeacon Boyles said the government should give leadership to finding a more humane, less destructive response to the residential schools lawsuits. "Certainly we believe that a response guided only be lawyers and legal processes is inadequate and ill-advised."
Archdeacon Boyles said there have been some signs recently that the government is prepared to take a broader look at its policy. "We hope letters from a wide range of Canadians will encourage the government to move rapidly toward a more just solution."
For background information on the residential schools see www.anglican.ca/ministry/rs/reports.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Archdeacon Jim Boyles 416-924-9199 ext. 280
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence); www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Bankruptcy - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Third parties (Law) - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Conflict management - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Parliament. House of Commons
Letter writing - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Video production on Gladys Cook to premiere at Winnipeg's IMAX theatre

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8896
Date
2005 March 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2005 March 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, March 7, 2005
An Anglican Video production that tells the dramatic story of a residential school survivor will premiere at the IMAX Theatre in Winnipeg on April 5 [2005].
"Topahdewin: The Gladys Cook Story" is a multi-faceted production by Anglican Video senior producer Lisa Barry that relates the story of a remarkable woman's life in the context of residential schools and how they affected the lives of children sent there. Gladys Cook not only survived the school, where she was raped at the age of 9, but went on to rediscover a profound faith that acknowledges both Christian and native spirituality, and to carve a distinguished career as an alcohol and drug abuse counselor.
Her contributions to society have earned her a Governor General's Award and a Canada 125 medal, among many other accolades.
The video is the culmination of a relationship between Ms. Cook and Ms. Barry that dates back to 1989. Ms. Barry notes that the video is the product of many encounters over the years and that it also makes use of extensive archival footage.
The premiere of "Topahdewin: The Gladys Cook Story" at 7:30 p.m., April 5 [2005], is sponsored by Anglican Video, the Anglican diocese of Rupert's Land and the local Indigenous Council.
Bishop Donald Phillips of Rupert's Land will open the evening and the screening of the video will be followed by remarks from Archbishop Terry Finlay, special representative on residential schools for Anglican Primate Archbishop Andrew Hutchison.
The program was produced by the Anglican Church of Canada as part of an initiative to memorialize the experiences of residential schools survivors, as the church agreed to do in an agreement with the federal government ending litigation over its role in running the schools.
- 30 -
For more information, please contact: Vianney (Sam) Carriere, Director of Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 306; scarriere@national.anglican.ca OR Lisa Barry, Senior Producer, Anglican Video, 416-924-9199 ext. 295; lbarry@national.anglican.ca
Subjects
Cook, Gladys (Topahdewin) Taylor, 1929-2009
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
Barry, Lisa
Anglican Video
Less detail

Beyond Traplines : Does the Church Really Care ? : Towards an Assessment of the Work of the Anglican Church of Canada with Canada's Native Peoples

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog2281
Author
Hendry, Charles Eric, 1903-1979
Publication Date
[1969]
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
E 78 C2 H4 1969
Author
Hendry, Charles Eric, 1903-1979
Place
[Toronto ON]
Publisher
Printed for the Anglican Church of Canada by the Ryerson Press
Publication Date
[1969]
Physical_Description
xi, 102 p. ; 21.2 x 21.2 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Charles E. Hendry".
Bibliography: pp. 101-102.
"I was approached by the Program Committee of the Anglican Church of Canada to undertake this assignment shortly after the Canadian Conference on Church and Society, held in Montreal in May, 1968. The theme of the Conference was 'Christian Conscience and Poverty' and during the Conference I talked with Indians, Metis and Eskimos. I became acutely aware that the native people of Canada are in serious trouble. .... This present action-oriented analysis is based on the assumption that the Anglican Church of Canada can make a substantial, strategic and significant contribution in relation to the needs, human resources and potential development of the native peoples of Canada. .... In this Report we look briefly at Canada's native people and some of the forces that have shaped them: we list some of the things the churches and the nation have done and some of the things they have failed to do; and we offer recommendations for action." -- Intro.
Contents: Introduction -- Acknowledgements / Charles E. Hendry -- Part One: The situation of Canada's native peoples -- The relationship of Western European missionaries to non-European peoples -- Value orientation re-examined -- Part Two: Anglican involvement in perspective -- Current policy and program orientation -- Missionary syndrome -- Part Three: Goals, strategies and tactics for change -- Implications for The Anglican Church of Canada -- Patterns for action: specific steps to implement change -- Part Four: Recommendations -- Appendix A: Specific Steps (Emphasis on the planning process) -- Appendix B: The Breakdown of Tribal Culture: A.D. 1769-1820 / George Irving Quimby -- Appendix C: A Position Paper Concerning the Stance of the Anglican Church to Indian Work, Prepared for Discussion Purposes dated 9 May 1966 / Edward W. Scott -- References.
Added Entry
Anglican Church of Canada. Program Committee
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Quimby, George Irving, 1913-2003
Hendry Report
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Missions
Anglican Church of Canada - Missions - History
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Missionaries - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Call Number
E 78 C2 H4 1969
Copies
2 copies
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Beyond traplines : Does the church really care ? : Towards an Assessment of the Work of the Anglican Church of Canada with Canada's Native Peoples

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog3056
Author
Hendry, Charles Eric, 1903-1979
Publication Date
1998
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
E 78 C2 H4 1998
Author
Hendry, Charles Eric, 1903-1979
Edition
[2nd rev. ed.]
Place
[Toronto ON
Publisher
Anglican Book Centre
Publication Date
1998
Physical_Description
xi, 112 [+1] p. ; 21.2 x 21.2 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Second revised edition. Originally published 1969.
"[By] Charles E. Hendry with with an introduction by the Rt. Rev. Gordon Beardy and an appendix on the work of the Anglican Church of Canada and government initiatives since the original release of `Beyond Traplines'."
Bibliography: pp. 111-112.
Includes statistics on native congregations and native clergy in new (1998) Appendix D page 101.
"The Hendry Report helped Native people take a big step toward self-determination. The report examined Canadian reality for the public in a way that had never been done before by any organization. The church was critical of itself and Canadian society and made recommendations that would address much of the pain and ignorance that had existed in our church community for so many years. 'Beyond Traplines' was a life-changing document for the Anglican church, with many powerful observations. It is, however, a document rooted in its own particular period of history and, because of that, there are some mistaken beliefs expressed and some landmark changes in Canada's history since 1969 that are, of course, not mentioned. The text of this report has been left the way it was written almost thirty years ago. There are inaccuracies in the text and the history has changed some of the reality that is being expressed within the descriptions of society, but the report still remains very powerful. Included at the end of this new release of 'Beyond Traplines' are appendices that reflect on the information contained within the report and work to bring people up to date on initiatives undertaken since 1969 in Aboriginal society, by the church and government. The Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, released 21 November 1996, continued this journey for Canada's Aboriginal peoples towards self-determination, but it also marked the possibility of something greater, that of healing and reconciliation for all of this nation's people. We, in the Anglican Church of Canada, celebrate this journey by educating the Canadian public about the Royal Commission, but also be continuing to use and develop our own uniquely Anglican resources". -- [1998] Foreword.
Contents: [1998] Foreword / Gordon Beardy, Seventh Bishop of Keewatin, Muskrat Dam First Nation -- [1969] Introduction / [Charles E. Hendry] -- Acknowledgements / Charles E. Hendry -- Part One: The situation of Canada's native peoples -- The relationship of Western European missionaries to non-European peoples -- Value orientation re-examined -- Part Two: Anglican involvement in perspective -- Current policy and program orientation -- Missionary syndrome -- Part Three: Goals, strategies and tactics for change -- Implications for The Anglican Church of Canada -- Patterns for action: specific steps to implement change -- Part Four: Recommendations -- Appendix A: Specific Steps (Emphasis on the planning process) -- Appendix B: The Breakdown of Tribal Culture: A.D. 1769-1820 / George Irving Quimby -- Appendix C: A Position Paper Concerning the Stance of the Anglican Church to Indian Work, Prepared for Discussion Purposes dated 9 May 1966 / Edward W. Scott -- [1998] Appendix D: The Work of the Anglican Church of Canada and Government Initiatives Since the Release of 'Beyond Traplines' -- References.
Added Entry
Anglican Church of Canada. Program Committee
Beardy, Gordon W.
Hendry Report
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Missions
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Claims - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Missionaries - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada - Statistics
ISBN
1-55126-227-4
Call Number
E 78 C2 H4 1998
Copies
2 copies
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

70 records – page 1 of 7.