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Churches prepare to re-open -- but not everywhere: Many parishes hoping to continue online services even as in-person worship resumes, bishops say

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42921
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 September
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 September
Volume
146
Issue
7
Page
1, 8
Notes
"As Anglican churches across Canada returned or planned to return to in-person worship this spring and summer, some senior church leaders were reporting a considerable level of desire on the part of parishes to continue online services" (p. 1). Article quotes several bishops including: Bishop Mary Irwin-Gibson of Montreal, Archbishop Anne Germond of Algoma, Archbishop Melissa Skelton of New Westminster, Archbishop David Edwards of Fredericton, National Indigenous Archbishop Mark MacDonald, and Archbishop Gregory Kerr-Wilson of Calgary. Bishop Mary Irwin-Gibson of Montreal commented: "I think what is interesting is that [churches] are almost all making plans to maintain an online version -- either separately or at the same time as the in-person service is held" (p. 1). Archbishop David Edwards of Fredericton, who was elected Metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province of Canada in June 2020, "said one of the main 'learning points' during the pandemic was the development of online resources. Parishes across the province have been engages with this to varying degrees, he said, with most dioceses supplementing and augmenting their efforts" (p. 8). "The church's Indigenous Ministries department was also finding online ministry important to Indigenous Anglicans during the pandemic and was hoping to continue it. In an effort to lift the spirits of Indigenous Anglicans, and of people across the church, the department of Indigenous Ministries had put on two online gospel jamborees, June 5 and July 1 [2020]. As this article was being written, it was planning a third for August 14" (p. 8). National Indigenous Archbishop Mark MacDonald said the pandemic "posed a particular threat to Indigenous people, particularly elders, because of the poverty, scant access to medical care and isolation that many reserve communities face" (p. 8). Indigenous Ministries Coordinator Canon Ginny Doctor also noted that "since the slow internet connections that exist in many Indigenous communities have hampered access to online events, her department and partners in the Anglican Church of Canada have been reaching some areas through regional radio broadcasts" (p. 8). "On April 2 [2020], PWRDF's Canadian Anglican Partnership Program launched 'Praying with PWRDF' a Zoom worship service for volunteers and PWRDF supporters" (p. 8). "The varying extent to which different parts of Canada have been affected by the pandemic has led civil governments to respond in different ways, with some relaxing social distancing rules earlier than others as infection rates of COVID-19 began to fall. Within the Anglican Church of Canada, correspondingly, ecclesiastical provinces, dioceses and parishes have moved toward re-opening with varying rules -- around how many people are permitted to attend a service at one time, for example, and how they might be able to take communion -- and timelines" (p. 8). Archbishop Anne Germond said that the dioceses of Algoma and Moosonee were "hoping to re-open Sept. 6 [2020] but others [were] looking at re-opening a week later. A spike in cases or a second wave of the pandemic, she said, would mean a return to online worship only" (p. 8).
"Archbishop Mark MacDonald is national Indigenous archbishop of the Anglican Church of Canada".
Subjects
COVID-19 (Disease) - Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Online worship - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Internet - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Public worship - Anglican Church of Canada
Liturgical adaptation - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada - 21st century
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Gospel jamborees
Irwin-Gibson, Mary (Mary Catherine), 1955-
Germond, Anne, 1960-
Skelton, Melissa (Melissa Maxine), 1951-
Edwards, David (David John), 1960-
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
Doctor, Ginny (Virginia Carol), 1950-2021
Kerr-Wilson, Gregory, 1962-
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Fetal alcohol syndrome among Aboriginal peopel in Canada : review and analysis of the intergenerational linkts to residential schools

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6949
Author
Tait, Caroline L.
Publication Date
2003
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
RG 629 F45 T3 2003
Author
Tait, Caroline L.
Place
Ottawa ON
Publisher
Aboriginal Healing Foundation
Publication Date
2003
Physical_Description
xxiii, 337 p. ; 28 x 21.5 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Prepared for the Aboriginal Healing Foundation by Caroline L. Tait".
Includes bibliographical references, p. 279-337.
"Widespread substance abuse, particularly alcohol abuse, among those who attended residential schools has been identified as both an outcome of the residential school experience and a contributing factor to other negative health and social problems among this group and among subsequent generations of Aboriginal people (Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, 1996b). Although no research studies exist that specifically examine the ways in which residential school experiences contributed to current rates of FAS/ARBES [fetal alcohol syndrome/alcohol-related birth effects] among Aboriginal people, this report concludes that the residential school system contributed to high rates of alcohol abuse among those who previously attended the schools and among significant numbers of parents and community members who had their children removed from their care because of the school system. This report also concludes that the residential school system further contributed to alcohol abuse among subsequent generations of Aboriginal people, including women of child-bearing ages." -- Executive Summary.
Contents: Acknowledgements / Caroline L. Tait -- Definitions -- Executive Summary -- Defining the Scope of the Project -- What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome ? -- Alcohol Use Among Aboriginal Peoples in Canada -- Child Abuse -- Residential Schools -- Contemporary Health and Social Issues Linked to the Residential School System -- Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Alcohol-Related Birth Effects: Epidemiology Review -- Risk and Protective Factors for Women -- 'Best Practices': Prevention -- Persons with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Other Alcohol-Related Birth Effects -- Epilogue -- Appendix A: 'Best Practices' -- Appendix B: Diagnostic Criteria for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Alcohol-Related Birth Effects (ARBE) Adopted by the American Institute of Medicine -- Appendix C: Screening Tools for Alcohol Use -- References.
Series
Aboriginal Healing Foundation research series
Added Entry
Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Canada)
Subjects
Fetal alcohol syndrome - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Mental health
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Alcohol use
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Child abuse - Canada
Indigenous children - Canada
Indigenous women - Canada
ISBN
0-9732763-8-X
Call Number
RG 629 F45 T3 2003
Location
General Synod Archives
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Indians Suffering from Tuberculosis

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5914
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Archdeacon Paul
Seconder
Canon Ahenakew
Text
Resolved, That whereas it has been stated by a medical authority on carefully prepared statistics that for every one white person who dies of tuberculosis, twenty Indians (in proportion to population) die;
And, whereas, there is no sufficient accommodation in the Sanatoria of Canada for Indian patients; and whereas, Tuberculosis is the greatest enemy and peril to the life of the Indians; be it resolved that, the Upper House concurring, the deputation which is to wait on the Premier to bring before him the matter of Indian education, be asked to bring before him also the matter of fighting Tuberculosis among the Indians. MESSAGE PP.
Subjects
Tuberculosis - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Medical care
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
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'It's like a rolling high tide that's coming'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42706
Author
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 May
Author
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 May
Volume
146
Issue
5
Page
3
Notes
"Indigenous communities, many of which are distant from hospitals, brace for the arrival of COVID-19. https://bit.ly/2wEeO1R".
"Visit anglicanjournal.com for these and more online-only stories. Including reports from the Anglican Communion,, messages of hope, theological reflections and coverage of the church's response in this unusual time".
"As Indigenous communities across Canada ramp up social distancing and isolation measures in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, Anglican Indigenous leaders say people are turning to prayer and looking to the past". “'Where I’m from, people are really alert now,' says Canon Norm Wesley, co-chair of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP). Wesley lives in Moose Factory, Ont., in the diocese of Moosonee." "The situation highlights what [National Indigenous Archbishop Mark] MacDonald calls 'the chronic shortage of resources' in Indigenous communities." "We hope that these measures that people are taking will keep them safe, but the reality is that…these communities are made particularly vulnerable by the lack of necessary support and resources in ways that most Canadians take for granted. This is creating a great vulnerability, and we pray that God will protect them. But it’s really uncovering in a really acute and tangible way what we need to do to make things good and just in the future,” said MacDonald.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
COVID-19 (Disease) - Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Pandemics - Canada
Indigenous Anglican Church
Wesley, Norman
MacDonald, Mark L. (Mark Lawrence), 1954-
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Role for church seen in vaccinating North

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43006
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 March
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 March
Volume
147
Issue
3
Page
3
Notes
"In guidance produced during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in April [2020], the World Health Organization (WHO) was emphatic: 'Religious leaders, faith-based organizations, and faith communities can play a major role in saving lives and reducing illness related to COVID-19". Dr. Nnamdi Ndubuka. medical health officer for the Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority (NITHA) says: "We do see a big role for the faith-based organizations, including churches .... I think engaging those communities and their leadership would be very important to promote the vaccine uptake and also dispel any misinformation regarding the vaccine". "More than 90% of confirmed cases on reserves since last March [2020] have been in Western Canada, Indigenous Services Canada reports".
"As of Jan. 14 [2021], the community of Split Lake, Man, -- home of Isaiah Beardy, suffragan bishop of the Northern Manitoba area mission -- was in total lockdown. Health authorities rolling out the vaccine have underscored the importance of local clergy. 'The priority [for vaccinations] is the frontline workers, meaning health and paramedics, firefighters', Beardy says. 'They included the clergy on the priority list. The clergy are frontline workers in my community'". "Michael Hawkins, bishop of the diocese of Saskatchewan, believes church leaders can play a public moral and symbolic role by sharing health information and setting a good example by getting vaccinated. Church buildings can also provide spaces for vaccination, he adds". "You need to provide leadeship, and I think the ministry of presence is so important that people are very comforted when the spiritual leaders are there with them", Bishop Beardy says.
Subjects
COVID-19 (Disease) - Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Vaccination
Vaccines - Canada
Public health - Canada
Public health - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ndubuka, Nnamdi
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Beardy, Larry (Isaiah Larry Johnson)
Hawkins, Michael (Michael William), 1962-
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Social Action Resolutions

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4126
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Date
1971 January - February
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Mover
The Venerable Andrew Ahenakew
Seconder
Mr. C.C. Kane
Text
That the Resolutions made at the first Indian Ecumenical Conference be referred to the Program Committee for appropriate action. CARRIED
Notes
The Resolutions are as follows:
A. "Be it Resolved:
This convention goes on record as opposing all interference in the natural and sacred relation between the Indian people and the animals and birds which the Creator placed on this island for our physical and spiritual sustenance. By interference we mean such things as requiring Indians to have a permit to hunt eagles, disregarding of Indian hunting rights in Oklahoma, the encouragement of commercial hunting of caribou in the Northwest Territories, the promotion of sportsman hunting to the detriment of hunting of food by Indians, etc."
B. "Whereas, the states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah have failed to recognize the sacred character of the rites of the Native American Church, and
Whereas, said failure has caused severe hardship and is a violation of their constitutionally guaranteed freedom of religion,
Now therefore, Be it Resolved
That the delegates attending the First All Indian Ecumenical Conference, themselves members of many different Christian and traditional faiths, recommend that the governments of each of the aforementioned states be asked to cease harassing members of the Native American Church and to immediately grant formal recognition of the sacred character of their rites."
C. "Be it Resolved
This convention wishes to go on record as expressing the strongest disapproval of the perversion of Indian sacred dances for commercial purposes by unauthorized groups, the taking of the Peyote sacrament by non-Indians in a secular contest, and all other such undignified mockeries of our ancient traditions."
D. "Be it Resolved
This convention petitions denominational authorities to permit those, both Indian and non-Indian, who work among Indian groups, the freedom to use native languages, traditions, dances, legends, and their own ancient religions as instruments of expression of the Christian life."
E. "Be it Resolved
This convention requests that in view of the recent ecumenical movement among Christian denominations that mission activity be better coordinated so as not to encourage excessive competition among sects in Indian communities which results in confusion and heightens such social disintegration as psychological turmoil and religious strife.
Further, we ask that missionaries always keep in mind that they are guests in our reservations and communities and that we are no longer a conquered passive people to be exploited spiritually."
F. "Be it Resolved
This convention most strongly wishes to point out to the governments of the United States and Canada that our treaties with them are not secular contracts to us but sacred covenants, ordained and sanctioned by God, which guarantee our existence as peoples and which establish a sacred reciprocity among the Indian, God, the natural world, and our recent European brothers.
Any disregard of our treaties is, in fact, a violation of our religion and Judeo-Christian ethics as well."
G. "Be it Resolved
The Convention wishes to encourage the teaching of Indian culture and language in those schools not now having such programs.
Further, this convention requests that those who teach Indian culture and history in schools be appointed after consultation with the Indian people involved and that non-essential education standards be waived so that native religionists can be utilized in such school programs.
H. "Be it Resolved
This convention strongly recommends that it be made the public policy of all public health agencies to work in cooperation with Indian medicine men and native Indian doctors.
Further, that all government hospitals be made aware of local Indian health and religious practices and be required to take them into account in hospitals practice and procedure.
Further, that local Indian communities be formed to act as liaison between the hospitals and the Community; and that these committees function to provide information to health agencies about Indian religious practices such as these agencies have about other religious groups.
I. "Be it Resolved
The delegates of the First All Indian Ecumenical Conference of North America, who are themselves members of many separate Christian and traditional denominations, unanimously recommend and call upon the National church organizations to take specific action to insure that all of its members extend their respect and assistance to small Christian denominations such as the Native American Church. In view of the recent ecumenical movement, it is untenable that religious persecution of a Christian Indian group be allowed to continue. Their plight is the concern of all Christians and we urge all Christians to take up their cause."
J. "Be it Resolved
This convention supports the efforts toward American Indian self-determination and attempts of all American Indian communities to create viable community organizations, both local community organizations and tribal organizations."
K. "Be it Resolved
The Convention go on record as opposing the indiscriminate desecration of our historic and religious monuments, our burial grounds, our pictographs, etc., by such outside institutions as universities, park service, the army Corps of Engineers, Highway Department, etc. We would strongly recommend that the Indian Religious leaders of the tribes involved be consulted before any excavations of these sacred places take place.
Further, that the sacred relics which are now in museums and which were collected by quasi-legal and immoral methods be returned on request to the tribe involved. Moreover, those sacred relics acquired legitimately by museums should be on loan for such periods as they are needed by Indian tribes. Further, museums should hire Indians qualified to care for such sacred objects now in their possession."
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Religion
Indigenous peoples - United States - Religion
Hunting - Religious aspects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Hunting - Law and legislation
Indigenous peoples - United States - Hunting - Law and legislation
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Indigenous peoples - United States - Health and hygiene
Indian Ecumenical Conference (1st : 1969) - Resolutions
Native American Church
Indigenous peoples - Missions
Indigenous spirituality
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Where the pavement ends : Canada's Aborigianl recovery movement and the urgent need for reconciliation

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/545
Author
Wadden, Marie, 1955-
Publication Date
2008
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
MM29.7 .W344
Author
Wadden, Marie, 1955-
Place
Vancouver and Toronto
Publisher
Douglas & McIntyre
Publication Date
2008
Physical_Description
264 p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Includes sources and index.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Social conditions
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Indigenous peoples - Substance use - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Healing - Social aspects - Canada
ISBN
978-1-55365-307-3
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
MM29.7 .W344
Less detail

Where the pavement ends : Canada's aboriginal recovery movement and the urgent need for reconcilation

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6090
Author
Wadden, Marie, 1955-
Publication Date
c2008
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
E 78 C2 W125 2008
Author
Wadden, Marie, 1955-
Place
Vancouver BC
Publisher
Douglas & McIntyre
Publication Date
c2008
Physical_Description
264 p. ; 22.8 x 15 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Marie Wadden".
"At the outset of my journey, I was unaware of the incredible work Aboriginal people are doing in the area of addiction. A vibrant Aboriginal healing movement has sprung up, with recovery programs being created in many communities. Yet, despite their many successes, these programs are seriously underfunded and understaffed, placing their continued existence in jeopardy. .... The pages of this book contain some answers. None of them are simple, since the problems are complex. Taken together, though, they outline some necessary steps on the path to finding solutions. With the launch of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2008, we have an opportunity to create a groundswell of support. The next five years will be crucial for raising public awareness about the damage done to Aboriginal society by the most egregious of Canadian government policies, the 1920 legislation that required First Nations parents to surrender their children to residential schools. We must make social healing in Aboriginal communities an immediate national priority. We must also demand public policy that guarantees First Nations, Inuit and Metis people the right to live as full and equal citizens. In these ways, we can offer true support to those committed to restoring health and happiness for the next generation". -- Intro.
Contents: Introduction -- Healing the Spirit -- A Frightening Prognosis -- A Birthday Party -- A Crippling Affliction -- A Family's Triumph over Addiction -- What Addicts Have in Common -- The Miracle at Alkali Lake -- Healing in Hollow Water -- The Trauma Connection -- Moving from Pain to Hope -- Seeking Solutions Down Under -- Heartache in Kenora -- Addiction, Violence and the Threat to Inuit Women -- Finding Strength in Inuit Culture -- The Power of Political Will in the Northwest Territories -- Health Canada: Addicted to Control -- Affirmative Action in British Columbia -- Community Planning: A Way Out of Addiction -- Implementing a National Strategy -- The Aboriginal Healing Foundation -- Lessons from Old Crow -- Conclusion -- Recommendations and Action Plan -- Sources -- Acknowledgements -- Index.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Social conditions
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Health and hygiene
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Substance abuse
Healing - Social aspects - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations
Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Canada)
ISBN
978-1-55365-307-3
Call Number
E 78 C2 W125 2008
Location
General Synod Archives
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8 records – page 1 of 1.