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Administration and Finance Committee

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official986
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
March 1986
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Most Rev. D.W. Hambidge
Seconder
Canon C. Alexander
Prologue
Moved by: Rt. Rev. E.K. Lackey
Seconded by: Rt. Rev. R. Ferris
That this National Executive Council request the Primate to establish a task force as soon as possible to determine ways of opening our national church structure to be receptive to any decision made by Anglican Native people in Canada meeting in Convocation. In particular this task force will make recommendations to the National Executive Council concerning the possibility of a separate jurisdiction for Native people within the Anglican Church of Canada and the possibility of establishing an episcopate for a Native person in any such jurisdiction.
Text
That the second portion of the motion be deleted. CARRIED
Amendment - That the second portion of the motion be deleted. CARRIED
Notes
The motion now reads: That this National Executive Council request the Primate to establish a task force as soon as possible to determine ways of opening our national church structure to be receptive to any decision made by Anglican Native people in Canada meeting in Convocation.
The motion as amended was put and CARRIED
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (1st : 1988 : Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask.)
Sacred Circle
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. National Indigenous Anglican Bishop
Less detail

Anglican diocese of the Arctic poised to elect church's first Inuk bishop

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official19
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1996 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO (May 25) -- The Anglican diocese of the Arctic is poised to make Canadian church history next week when it meets in Iqaluit to elect a new suffragan bishop.
To date, three men have been nominated, all of them Inuk. They are Rev. Ben Arreak of Pangnirtung, Canon Abeli Napartuk of Puvirtuq and Rev. Paul Idlout of Cape Dorset. If the diocesan synod, which meets May 27, elects one of them, he will become the first Inuk bishop in the Anglican Church of Canada.
(The Anglican church has two aboriginal bishops: Bishop Charles Arthurson, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Saskatchewan and Bishop Gordon Beardy, an assistant bishop in the diocese of Keewatin. Assistant bishops usually have responsibility for a specific geographic part of their diocese.)
The Arctic election on May 27 is to select a successor to Bishop Terrence Buckle, the previous assistant or suffragan bishop of the Arctic, who was recently elected Bishop of the Yukon.
Bishop Christopher Williams of the Arctic explained that under diocesan law, it is possible for nominations to be made up to 72 hours before the electoral synod begins its meeting.
The new bishop will be consecrated at St. Jude's Cathedral in Iqaluit on Sunday June 2.
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, Media Relations, General Synod, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Arreak, Ben (Benjamin)
Napartuk, Abeli
Idlout, Paul
Less detail

a. Provisional Committee on Theological Education page 4.

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8723
Date
1961 September 28 - 30
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1961 September 28 - 30
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Toronto
Seconder
Suffragan Bishop of Huron
Prologue
Arising from a discussion on the meaning of Sponsorship of Theological Students.
Text
That the Primate be requested to appoint a committee of three bishops to draft a full statement regarding the meaning of sponsorship of theological students by the bishop. The statement to be of such a nature that it could be presented to the General Synod in the form of a Canon or considered as a directive from the House of Bishops to the Heads of Theological Colleges. And that the Committee considers all matters referred to in the letter from the Heads of Colleges to the Bishops. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX
LETTER FROM HEADS OF COLLEGES
February 15th, 1961.
The Right Reverend Tom Greenwood, L.Th., D.D.
Secretary of the House of Bishops
Box 547
Whitehorse, Yukon.
My Lord Bishop:
At this brief conference held at Scarborough, immediately after we were privileged to meet with the House of Bishops, the Heads of Colleges discussed the subjects handed to us from that meeting.
1. Screening of Candidates for Holy Orders: Modified forms of C.A.C.T.M. [Central Advisory Council for the Ministry (Church of England)] were discussed, but we supposed that it was not within our competence to make resolutions, and our discussion did not get beyond a general opinion that such a move would be advantageous. Most of our discussion centred around, the pre-theological student, and the general feeling here was that men in this category should be handled in the same way as other undergraduate students, i.e. purely on the basis of accepted academic entrance qualification, and not as ordinands.
2. Sponsorship of Theological Students: We were left in some confusion as to the bishops' understanding of sponsorship, and I, as secretary, was asked to seek further clarification.
We understand that it is the desire of the bishops to distinguish 'sponsorship' from financial support; and we were encouraged by the impression we gained that the bishops are prepared to distinguish financial support from obligation to service.
It was our opinion that whatever 'sponsorship' might mean in regard to the theological student, any such condition for the pre-theological student would be premature. He is better regarded as an undergraduate student in Arts. None of this was intended to minimise the importance of pastoral care of and interest in such students form the start. We were concerned about the possible 'conditional' nature of such sponsorship as is proposed inhibiting such students from normal healthy competitive development in their undergraduate days.
As for theological students, nearly all of whom at present are in some direct way associated with a diocesan, we failed to appreciate the value of any rule making this necessary.
If we have misinterpreted the intention in this matter we shall eagerly anticipate correction.
3. Pastoralia and Devotional training in Course: As this is a matter largely of concern to the faculties of colleges we have referred the matter to the faculties for discussion, and if they so desire, to report back to us.
4. Training of a Native Ministry: All 'old Canadians' having the necessary entrance qualifications are welcomed at all the Colleges. But it is manifestly unprofitable to include in our present courses men whose English or general education does not enable them to compete. From the experience of some of the colleges frustration and failure among such candidates have been high and there is also apparently a real risk of "detribalisation'. In other words Indian students (we have had no experience of Eskimos) tend to loneliness and frustration, or to become Europeanised, and so to lose touch with their own people. It would therefore, appear to us that better results might be expected where such candidates are not removed from their own environment and culture, and that they are better trained by men familiar with their language and culture. We would like to have heard reports on the Summer courses held at Dauphin. The Conference asked that the three prairie colleges with some experience of training such men should continue conversations with the Bishop of Brandon on this matter.
5. Training of 'Special Course' men outside the Colleges: Recognising that the Colleges as presently constituted, are not directly concerned; that in the brief to the bishops from the Heads of Colleges we stated our readiness to accept men in this category, where possible, under a Bishop's sponsorship; and recognising this as a specified area of concern for the Provisional Committee on Theological Education, the Conference of Heads did however, venture to commend the work already done in the four centres (Halifax, Montreal, Toronto and Huron). We were particularly relieved that residence and post-ordination internships are requirements for such men. In regard to residence for such men all the colleges will gladly assist within the limitations set by any other agreements.
I am asked to say again, my Lord Bishop, how greatly appreciated by us was the Primate's and hospitality, and the courtesy of the House of Bishops.
Yours sincerely, F.H.W. CRABB Secretary Heads of Colleges Conference.
Subjects
Theological colleges - Anglican Church of Canada
Theological education - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Training of
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Heads of Colleges
Less detail

Audacious Anglicans : Heroes of the Anglican Communion : Henry Budd 1812-1875

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30068
Author
Moore, Robert J., 1931-
Rayner, Gerald T. (Gerald Theodore), 1929-2012
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2003 Easter
Author
Moore, Robert J., 1931-
Rayner, Gerald T. (Gerald Theodore), 1929-2012
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2003 Easter
Issue
109
Page
38-40
Notes
The story of Henry Budd (Sakaceswescam), a Swampy Cree Indian born in what is now Manitoba, who became the first Aboriginal Anglican priest in North America in 1853. Budd was a catechist and then priest for the Church Missionary Society one of several native clerics who were deemed to be "sufficiently Victorian to be authoritative and sufficiently indigenous to be effective". In fact, as time went on Budd showed greater appreciation for the Cree culture and language. "He left more than a memory behind. He left an inspiration. There is a seminary at The Pas, Manitoba, named in his honour, the Henry Budd College for Ministry, which trains aboriginal persons for both lay and ordained ministries. And there are several bishops among the 130 aboriginal persons of both genders in the Anglican Orders in Canada witnessing to the power of his example. He has been called `the apostle to the Native Canadian church' and on the 2nd of April each year the Anglican Church of Canada commemorates the life and work of this quietly, audacious Anglican and hero of our Communion".
Subjects
Budd, Henry, 1812-1875
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and culture - Anglican Church of Canada
Cree - Manitoba
Less detail

Beardy becomes first native diocesan bishop

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6809
Date
1996 October 17
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1996 October 17
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Kenora, October 17, 1996 -- Canada's first aboriginal person to become a diocesan bishop is the Right Reverend Gordon Beardy, elected here Wednesday [16 October]. Bishop Beardy was elected on the sixth ballot from a field of six candidates.
Bishop Beady, 46 is a former Oji-Cree chief who has been suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Keewatin since September 1993. His election as the diocesan, or senior bishop, will be seen as significant by the church, especially by native Anglicans who make up a majority of the diocese.
"My first priority will be to listen to the people of the diocese, to hear what they have to say about the future of Keewatin. We will continue to work together as the Body of Christ," says Bishop Beardy.
The Diocese of Keewatin covers about 300,000 square miles in northern Ontario and Manitoba. It stretches from Rainy River and Fort Frances, in the south, up to Fort Severn and Churchill on the shores of Hudson's Bay. There are more than 50 parishes in the diocese, about 3/5 of them dotted across its northern regions, and served by non-stipendiary (unpaid), locally raised and educated, indigenous priests.
Bishop Beardy is among those who have given leadership to the training of native clergy. As a young man, he assisted his father, the Reverend Eliezer Beardy, with the translation of study materials from English into native languages. Later he became an instructor with the "Train an Indian Priest" (TAIP) program.
He was a Band Counsellor [i.e. Councillor] and, from 1983 to 1987, Band Chief, at Muskrat Dam, Ontario. A skilled political leader, together with the First Nations Council, he initiated economic development programs so successful that the small community was force to begin importing workers from neighbouring settlements.
In the church, Bishop Beardy has served in several capacities beyond parish and diocesan boundaries. He has been a member of the church's national executive council, and has served on the Primate's commission on evangelism.
For further information, contact: Susan Barclay or Margaret Lavergn, c/o Keewatin Synod Office, 8078-547-3353, 807-547-3356
- 30 -
Subjects
Beardy, Gordon
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Keewatin
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Less detail
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Act 93
Date
1989 June 15-23
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Act 93
Mover
Mr. E.H. Fisher
Seconder
Rt. Rev. A.G. Peters
Prologue
Moved by: Rt. Rev. J.C. Fricker
Seconded by: Dr. D. Gould
That there be included in the Calendar of the Anglican Church of Canada, for commemoration as appropriate and for publication at some future date:
John Stuart, Roberta Elizabeth Tilton, Mary Brant, John Charles Roper, the consecration of Charles Inglis.
Text
That the name of Simon Gibbons, first Inuit priest, be added to this resolution. CARRIED Act 92
Notes
Archdeacon Charles Staples requested the Doctrine and Worship Committee to reconsider the decision to use the name Mary Brant as in the Diocese of Ontario, she was known by the name Molly. The mover and seconder agreed to include the name in the Calendar as Mary (Molly) Brant.
The motion now reads:
That there be included in the Calendar of the Anglican Church of Canada, for commemoration as appropriate and for publication at some future date:
John Stuart [August 17], Roberta Elizabeth Tilton [May 30], Mary (Molly) Brant [April 16], John Charles Roper [May 27], Simon Gibbons [December 14], the consecration of Charles Inglis [August 12]. CARRIED Act 93
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Alternative Services. Calendar
Saints - Anglican Church of Canada
Stuart, John, 1740-1811
Tilton, Roberta Elizabeth, d. 1925
Brant, Mary (Molly), c1736-1796
Roper, John Charles, 1858-1940
Inglis, Charles, 1734-1816
Gibbons, Simon, 1852?-1896
Christian saints - Calendar - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

[Canada's First Corps of Anglican Trapper Priests]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5119
Date
1972 June 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1972 June 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
A group of 15 Cree and Ojibway Indians will begin training this month to become Canada's first corps of Anglican "trapper priests."
The native theological students, when ordained in three years, will serve without pay to help meet the spiritual needs of isolated northern communities in the 255,000-square mile Diocese of Keewatin.
The "trapper priests" will earn their livelihoods as they did before ordination - as trappers, loggers, fishermen and guides.
The innovative program sprang from a remark made by a Cree representative to the Bishop's Council in Keewatin, Bishop Hugh Stiff revealed.
"The man wanted to know why his village could not have a communion service every Sunday as white villages have, instead of every three months."
It was agreed that each village would select from their people "a man whom they thought was godly" for priestly training.
The Bishop's Council, consisting of Indian advisers to the bishop, screens the candidates for the 9-week training course spread over three summers.
The first contingent of trapper priest candidates will begin training June 15 at Star Lake, 30 miles west of Kenora. The idea is to train the students in their own environment, Bishop Stiff said.
"I couldn't take these men and put them in a regular seminary when they don't understand English," the 56-year old bishop explained. "The cultural shock would be pretty tremendous."
"Big Trout Lake, for instance, is 300 miles north of Kenora. You can imagine the isolation. To pull a man out of there and put him in a white environment would be devastating."
Four clergymen and two laymen will assist in the teaching.
The students will study the role of the minister in the church, in the community, as a mean of prayer, as a pastor, Christian doctrine, the sacraments, church history, and the Bible. Studies will be supplemented by on-the-job training under the supervision of Archdeacon Gary Woolsey, the young, energetic priest-pilot of the diocese.
If all the trapper priests candidates complete their studies and are accepted for ordination, the Diocese of Keewatin in three years will almost double its present complement of 18 priests.
Bishop Stiff, an ex-Navy man and former buyer for a supermarket chain in Toronto who was ordained relatively late in life - at 36 - sees the trapper priest concept as an experiment - which if successful, could be greatly expanded.
Recently, in British Columbia, an Indian was ordained a deacon after he was selected by his people as their natural religious leader.
Archbishop Ralph Dean, Metropolitan of British Columbia, sees the move toward the supplementary ministry as a very natural one.
"A man doesn't have to be a professional to be a priest," Archbishop Dean said. "It need not be necessary for him to make his living out of it."
"I see a great increase of what we call the supplementary ministry," he added.
"Although I think we are wrong in using that phrase, because I think that's the real ministry. It's the professionals like me, we're the supplements. That's the New Testament view, you know, and that's the way the church was until 325 A.D. and it didn't do badly."
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
Michael O'Meara, Director of Communications, Anglican Church of Canada, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario, 924-9192 or
Bishop Hugh Stiff, Synod Office, Kenora, 468-7011
Subjects
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Keewatin
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Appointment, call and election
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Training of
Theological education - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonstipendiary clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Secular employment
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Woolsey, Gary (Gary Frederick), 1942-2013
Stiff, Hugh V. (Hugh Vernon), 1916-1995
Less detail

Catherine Morrison : a healing journey

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article28525
Author
Tindal, Doug, 1952-
Carriere, Vianney (Sam), 1947-2014
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2000 Winter
Author
Tindal, Doug, 1952-
Carriere, Vianney (Sam), 1947-2014
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2000 Winter
Volume
7
Issue
1
Page
16
Notes
The Rev. Catherine Morrison [Askew], a 28 year old Cree woman from Ontario, was ordained a deacon in the Anglican Church of Canada by the Rt. Rev. James Cruickshank, Bishop of Cariboo. Ms. Morrison and her husband will become co-rectors of the Anglican parishes in Lytton B.C., former home of the St. George's Indian Residential School. The community includes Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal parishes, including parishioners who suffered sexual abuse. "Morrison acknowledged the challenge of beginning her ministry in such an emotionally charged context, but also said the opportunity offers `a great privilege'."
Subjects
Askew, Catherine Morrison
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
St. George's School (Lytton, B.C.)
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Intercultural communication - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Diocese of Saskatchewan : Suffragan Bishop of

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1517
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 24-2-88
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 24-2-88
Mover
Bishop Lackey
Seconder
Bishop Bays
Prologue
Bishop Morgan informed the House that the Diocese of Saskatchewan is in the process of studying a request of the Cree people for the election of a Cree suffragan bishop. He said that there are ten Cree priests and three postulants and thirty Cree communities. He has spoken to the Diocesan Indian Council and with the Chancellor of the Diocese and it is felt that this is a very good thing for the Diocese of Saskatchewan. However, he expressed some concern regarding relationships with the rest of the church about going ahead.
Text
That this House express its support and encouragement to Bishop Morgan as the Diocese of Saskatchewan proceeds to the election of a Cree Suffragan Bishop for the Diocese of Saskatchewan. CARRIED
Subjects
Cree - Saskatchewan
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Saskatchewan
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous bishops - Anglican Church of Canada
Arthurson, Charles (Charles John), 1937-
Less detail

Historic Gathering of Native Peoples Ponders Future in Anglican Church

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6884
Date
1988 September 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1988 September 19
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan - More than 200 native Canadian members of the Anglican church of Canada will gather here at the end of September to consider their future in the church.
"This is a milestone event for Anglican native people," explained the Rev. Laverne Jacobs, Co-ordinator of Native Ministries for the church, and a member of the Chippewa Nation.
"We take this convocation as a sign that the mainstream of the church is finally ready to begin listening to those of us who are the original peoples of this land and also members of the Anglican Church of Canada."
"Our Christian faith and our church are very important to us, but so are our various native heritages. We believe that room can - and must - be made for us within the structures of the church so that we may be fully participating members while still celebrating and retaining our cultural identities as native peoples."
Wrap-Up News Conference
Leaders of the Native Convocation will join with Archbishop Michael Peers in a news conference at the conclusion of the Convocation.
Wednesday, October 5, 9 am
St. Paul's Cathedral
1861 McIntyre Street
Regina
"Fort San" to Receive Healing Service
The convocation will be held at the Echo Valley Conference Centre from September 28 to October 5. This centre is known locally as the "Fort San" since it was once a sanitorium where many native people were hospitalized with tuberculosis. Recognizing that this location may evoke some painful memories, plans have been made for the convocation to include a service of healing, with participation by Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Major participation in the convocation is expected from the Cree and Ojibway peoples of central Canada and the Prairie provinces, from the Git'ksan, Haida and Nisga'a peoples of British Columbia, and from the various other aboriginal nations that have significant membership in the Anglican Church of Canada. Although the Inuit members of the Anglican Diocese of the Arctic have opted not to be full participants in the convocation, they will send observers.
All native clergy have been invited to participate in the convocation, and in addition, each of the 188 native congregations in the country has been asked to send a non-ordained representative of its choice.
Dioceses without identified native congregations have been encouraged to send one native Anglican person as a diocesan representative.
Highest Native Membership
Native people account for about 3.4 percent of the membership of the Anglican Church of Canada, the highest native membership rate in any major denomination and largely the result of historic mission connections. Participants at the conference will share their stories, their faith, and their experiences, and will discuss ways they can take their full place in the life of the church. Three areas of common concern were flagged at a pre-convocation planning meeting: being Indian in an Anglican structure; spirituality; and how to involve and care for young people.
Anglican congregations without native membership have also been asked to support the convocation through financial contributions, through raising their awareness about the concerns of native people, and through prayer.
- 30 -
For further information, contact:
Rev. Laverne Jacobs
Coordinator of Native Ministries
(416) 924-9192
Sept. 29 to Oct. 4
Liz Jackson
(306) 332-5949
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Native Convocation (1st : 1988 : Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask.)
Sacred Circle
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Inuit - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and culture - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.