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Aboriginal Day of Prayer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1329
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-87
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-87
Mover
Bishop Morgan
Seconder
Archbishop Hambidge
Prologue
Bishop Morgan drew attention to the document "The New Covenant" stating that appeals have been received from native people that the Sunday before the First Minister's Conference be designated a Day of Prayer.
Text
That this House of Bishops respond to the request of Native leaders for the Churches to name a Day of Prayer to precede the final First Ministers' Conference to be held on March 26-27, by designating Sunday, March 22, as a Day of Prayer for Aboriginal Peoples:
And that we commend the document entitled "A New Covenant" prepared as a Pastoral Statement by leaders of the Christian Churches to be used as a focus for this Day of Prayer. CARRIED
Subjects
Day of Prayer for Aboriginal Peoples (22 March 1987)
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Government relations - 1951-
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
First Ministers' Conference on Aboriginal Constitutional Matters (1987 : Ottawa, Ont.)
A New Covenant
Special Sundays
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The Elusive Goal: The Commitment to Indigenous Self-Determination in the Anglican Church of Canada, 1967–2020

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42994
Author
Hayes, Alan L. (Alan Lauffer)
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican and Episcopal History
Date
2020 September
Author
Hayes, Alan L. (Alan Lauffer)
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican and Episcopal History
Date
2020 September
Volume
89
Issue
3
Page
255-280
Notes
Dr. Alan L. Hayes argues “…colonial assumptions and structures have proven tenacious, and that, although Indigenous self-determination is consistent with historical patterns of Christian mission and organization, the theological, constitutional, and financial obstacles to decolonization have defied solution.” Models which could better promote indigenous self-determination within the Anglican Church of Canada are explored.
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Missions - History
Indigenous Anglican Church - Finance
Indigenous Anglican Church - History
Indigenous spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
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Pioneer Missionaries to the Nishga: The Crosscurrents of Demon Rum and British Gunboats, 1860-1871

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38822
Author
Gough, Barry M., 1938-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1984 October
Author
Gough, Barry M., 1938-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1984 October
Volume
26
Issue
2
Page
81-95
Notes
"On this frontier, as on others, a battle was joined in Professor Asa Briggs' word, 'between gin and Bibles', between traders and missionaries. The former argued for the benefits of free trade and the need to serve the marketplace; the latter reasoned that the traders' activity made a mockery of the concept of trusteeship" (p. 83-83). "As in adjacent and other coastal waters, liquor trafficking at the Nass River entrance was extensive, and the colonial governments of Vancouver Island and British Columbia endeavoured to introduce legislation to control the sale or gift of spiritous liquors to the Indians and called on the Royal Navy, stationed at Esquimalt, to enforce colonial liquor ordinances" (p. 84). In 1864 the Rev. Robert R.A. Doolan arrived as the CMS (Church Missionary Society) missionary to the Nishga of the Nass River. "If Doolan's influence 'was not a coercive force .. but an avenue of voluntary change'. why is it that he found it necessary to call for a gunboat to provide a show of power in support of his war against liquor and recalcitrant chiefs in the Lower Nass Villages ?" (p. 86). "The prevalence of whisky and the resistance of chiefs were the main reasons for removing the mission of the Lower Nass Villages in 1867. .... Metlakatla, the major mission, became the base for missionary tours to surround the tribes and to the Nass. It was also decided to relocate the Nass mission nearer the river entrance, at Kincolith, Nass Bay" (p. 89). "Yet the Nass story is not merely a missionary and native affair: it involve the extension of British law and order; liquor trafficking brought an intensification of violence, and it brought the intervention by authorities in the form of British gunboats. Both represented the paradox of progress of the Victorian age: the one was the enemy of the missionary, and the other the supporter of the missionary. In short order, neither the missionary nor the natives stood apart from the prevailing ethos that surrounded them all and made even more complex the varieties of native response" (p. 91).
Subjects
Nisga'a - British Columbia
Doolan, Robert (Robert Reid Arthur)
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
British Columbia - History
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Missions - History
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