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AIDS hospice fund gets `moral support'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article24714
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1998 April
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1998 April
Volume
124
Issue
4
Page
6
Notes
The Diocese of Ottawa AIDS committee is working to promote the hospice.
From Crosstalk.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Ottawa
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglicans approve report opposing euthanasia, assisted suicide

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7129
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 28, 1998 -- The Anglican Church of Canada's chief governing body has endorsed a report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The 300 members of the Anglican General Synod meeting here this week, commended the report which states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community". The report will now go to Anglican churches across the country for study and response.
Bishop Victoria Matthews of Edmonton who proposed the motion, said the report was created to engage Christians in ethical and theological reflection relating to euthanasia and assisted suicide. Our purpose is not to try and tell the government how to act, but to help Anglicans become aware of the concerns surrounding these practices".
Bishop Matthews said Christians view life as a gift that is not ours to discard", and noted that every life must be considered in relation to those in the wider society.
The report states that the Christian response is always one of hope. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
The resolution approved by General Synod asks that the report and supporting documents be circulated throughout the Canadian Anglican community and that responses be considered by next year by the Council of General Synod. The council meets in years when General Synod does not.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Euthanasia and assisted suicide a "failure of human community" Anglican report says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7125
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 24, 1998 -- Anglicans across the country will be asked to respond to a new report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The report, which will be presented to the 300 members gathered for the Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod meeting here this week, states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community".
"The Christian response is always one of hope," the report says. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report goes on "We would further urge that the attempt to change the law and practice at a time when health services are being cut back and costs downloaded onto patients and their families is inappropriate."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
General Synod delegates are to debate the report in the next few days.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Public health - Canada
Less detail

The Pioneering Side of Foundation Ministry

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article18057
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
AF Report
Date
1995 Spring
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
AF Report
Date
1995 Spring
Issue
6
Page
[1], [3]
Notes
The Anglican Foundation "also provides grants as 'seed' money to parishes, dioceses and Anglican sponsored groups which are seeking to establish new ministries to meet both Church and community needs". Includes brief overview of some grants in the last five years for hospices, counselling centres, transportation (vans), training courses, summer camp programs and more.
Subjects
Anglican Foundation of Canada - Grants
Congregational development - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church renewal - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Twelve weeks in spring

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog2169
Author
Callwood, June, 1924-2007
Publication Date
c1986
Material Type
Book
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Call Number
RC 265.6 F73C35 1986 MISSING
Author
Callwood, June, 1924-2007
Place
Toronto ON
Publisher
Lester & Orpen Dennys
Publication Date
c1986
Physical_Description
312 p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Added sub-title on front cover: The Inspiring Story of Margaret and Her Team.
0n 20 June 1986 Margaret Frazer died of cancer. She died at home after twelve weeks of care by friends, many of whom were members of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Toronto. After her death, many of Margaret's friends participated in the establishment of Casey House, a hospice for AIDS patients, and subsequently in the establishment of the Trinity Hospice Toronto.
Subjects
Frazer, Margaret
Cancer - Patients - Ontario - Biography
Cancer - Patients - Home care
Cancer - Religious aspects - Christianity
Death - Religious aspects - Christianity
Palliative treatment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Holy Trinity Anglican Church (Toronto, Ont.)
Trinity Hospice Toronto
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
ISBN
0-88619-115-7 (pbk)
Call Number
RC 265.6 F73C35 1986 MISSING
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Less detail