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2017 calendar to highlight Anglican, Lutheran mission work

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39693
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 October
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 October
Volume
142
Issue
8
Page
13
Notes
"Instead of featuring photos of Anglican churches from across the country, next year's calendar [2017] will show Canadian Anglicans and Lutherans engaged in mission work, the national office announced earlier this year". "'There are some beautiful church buildings, there's no doubt about that', he said. 'But the loveliest thing about the church is God's people engaged in the transforming mission of God; feeding the hungry and looking after .. the poor, sheltering AA groups, welcoming refugees'. Production of the calendar, formerly handled by the 'Anglican Journal', will now be overseen by Trina Gallop Blank, director of communications and stewardship of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) and Meghan Kilty, director of communication and information resources for the Anglican Church of Canada. The new concept for the calendar stems from a meeting between the Anglican and Lutheran staff in 2014. The ELCIC had been expressing interest in a jointly produced calendar for several years already".
Subjects
Canadian Church Calendar (2017)
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Church buildings - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Across Canada: Rupert's Land

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article16897
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 November
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 November
Volume
120
Issue
9
Page
2
Notes
The Anglican diocese of Calgary, the Roman Catholic diocese of Calgary, and the Alberta Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, have formed a task force to develop a covenant between the three churches.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Calgary
Interdenominational cooperation
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Catholic Church
Catholic Church - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Communion News Service : Canada : Anglicans and Lutherans call for Full Communion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article16979
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1994 Michaelmas
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1994 Michaelmas
Issue
75
Page
25
Notes
"Members of the dialogue between Anglicans and Lutherans in Canada have issued a call for the two churches to work toward `full communion' by 2001."
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Full communion
Less detail

Anglican Lutheran dialogue : gifts to share

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article23755
Author
Holst, Wayne A. (Wayne Alfred)
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1998 Winter
Author
Holst, Wayne A. (Wayne Alfred)
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1998 Winter
Volume
5
Issue
1
Page
13-14
Notes
The author, a Lutheran pastor, was involved in Anglican-Lutheran ecumenical cooperation and parish ministry twenty-five years ago. He comments on the current state of Anglican-Lutheran relations and points to the "Evangelical Declaration" adopted by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada in July 1997 which said that "we commit ourselves, as church to share our gifts with the whole people of God beyond our specific denominational and national context".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Full communion
Episcopacy - Anglican Church of Canada
Episcopacy - Lutheran Church
Episcopacy and Christian union
Evangelical Declaration
Less detail

Anglican/Lutheran Draft Declaration of Full Communion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7050
Date
1997 November 5-7
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 07-11-97
Date
1997 November 5-7
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 07-11-97
Mover
Ms. L. Roff
Seconder
Mrs. D. Brookes
Text
That this Council of General Synod welcome the Anglican Lutheran Joint Working Group's Draft Declaration of Full Communion between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Canada; and that it give approval to the circulation of "CALD [i.e. Called to Full Communion] throughout the Anglican Church of Canada for study and comment. CARRIED #07-11-97
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Full communion
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Christian union - Anglican Church of Canada
Called to Full Communion
Less detail

Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission #025-01-02-05 : Guidelines for Clergy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8195
Date
2002 May 3-5
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-05-02
Date
2002 May 3-5
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-05-02
Mover
Archdeacon James Cowan
Seconder
Mrs. Betty Livingston
Prologue
The Rev. Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan presented the report of the Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission.
Text
That the Council of General Synod adopt the "Guidelines for Anglican and Lutheran Clergy Serving Term Appointments in Each Other's Churches" and request appropriate bodies to implement them. CARRIED #16-05-02
Notes
Note: "appropriate bodies" would include the bishops, dioceses, chancellors, human resources personnel, the pension departments of both churches and theological colleges.
Guidelines for Anglican and Lutheran Priests and Pastors Serving Term Appointments in Each Other's Churches
When a term appointment is contemplated the following process shall be followed with the Terms of Appointment defined:
Eligibility
Only clergy in good standing with their own church are eligible for term appointments.
Initiative
When a term appointment of priest or pastor to a congregation of the other church is contemplated, it must have the approval of both bishops concerned. The initiative may come from an ordained person, the local ministry setting, or the bishop.
Process
1. If priest or pastor wishes to be available for a term appointment in the other church, that person should contact his/her own bishop who then consults with the counterpart bishop.
2. If the initiative is from the congregation or other ministry setting, the responsible persons contact their own bishop, who then consults with the counterpart bishop.
3. If the bishop of a synod/diocese wishes to appoint a pastor/priest of the other church, that bishop contacts the appropriate bishop of the other church.
4. A full curriculum vitae of ministry and ordination history shall be provided to the receiving bishop.
5. A police letter of record and a child abuse registry check shall be provided to the receiving bishop.
6. The receiving bishop issues a letter of appointment setting out the terms of the appointment.
7. The appointment shall be marked liturgically as soon as possible to the beginning date of the term using appropriate forms, e.g. "Installation of a Pastor" or "Celebration of a New Ministry", and adapting as necessary for the circumstances.
Terms of Appointment
Terms of appointment shall include:
1. Length of the term
2. Remuneration, including housing, travel, pension and benefits
3. Salary/stipend shall be according to the scale of the receiving synod/diocese. The salary source is responsible for provision of housing or an allowance in lieu thereof, and travel reimbursement, both according to the scale of the receiving church.
4. Pension, Long Term Disability and Continuing Education contributions will be paid into the plan(s) of the originating church. Other benefits (e.g. group health) will normally be according to the plan(s) of the receiving church but may be negotiated between the two bodies, as these plans vary from one synod/diocese to another.
5. Vacation, days off, educational leave and sabbatical leave shall be in accordance with the policy of the receiving church.
6. Provision for review after one year under the polity and practice of the receiving diocese/synod.
Accountability
1. All persons appointed under this guideline are subject to the discipline of the receiving church and shall be required to comply with all applicable regulations in effect in that church, including canons/constitutions, policies and guidelines. If matters of discipline arise the receiving bishop shall not institute proceedings until notice has been given to the bishop of the sending church and that bishop has given consent for proceedings to be instituted. The sending bishop shall either give consent or institute proceedings in the sending church. Deposition/removal from roster may only be imposed by the sending church.
2. Process for early termination will be according to the regulations in force in the receiving church, with a report made to the originating church. Consultation between the two bishops is encouraged throughout such a process.
Orientation
1. The receiving bishop shall appoint a mentor to assist the clergy person in acquiring a working knowledge of the polity and practice of the receiving church, and to be available as a resource during the course of the term.
2. Items to be included in orientation shall include at least (as appropriate):
a. Constitutions/canons of congregation, synod/diocese and national church
b. ELCIC Statement on Sacramental Practices
c. Any guidelines presently in effect in the synod/diocese and national church
d. Conduct of worship and pastoral care in that church
e. Introduction to the theological emphases of the receiving church
3. The mentor shall conduct an exit interview at the end of the term and ensure that appropriate parish records have been kept.
Resources
Anglican
Handbook of General Synod Canon XVIII on Discipline
Sexual Harassment Policy
House of Bishops Guidelines
Applicable provincial and diocesan policies
Lutheran
ELCIC Constitution, Article 7; By-laws Part 3
ELCIC Manual for Discipline of Ministers
Applicable synodical policies
Please send comments to:
Rev'd Cindy Halmarson, ELCIC National Office, 302-393 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6, chalmar@elcic.ca 204-984-9156
Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, General Synod, 600 Jarvis St., Toronto ON M4Y 2J6, abarnettcowan@national.anglican.ca 416-924-9199 ext. 281
Subjects
Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Clergy
Shared ministry - Canada
Less detail

Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission #025-01-02-05 : Guidelines for Common Worship

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8196
Date
2002 May 3-5
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 17-05-02
Date
2002 May 3-5
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 17-05-02
Mover
Archdeacon James Cowan
Seconder
Canon Grant Hyslop
Prologue
The Rev. Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan presented the report of the Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission.
Text
That the Council of General Synod adopt the "Guidelines for Common Worship" and request appropriate bodies to implement them. CARRIED #17-05-02
Notes
Guidelines for Common Worship
for Lutherans and Anglicans in Canada
Introduction
In July, 2001, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada signed the Waterloo Declaration establishing a relationship of full communion between them. These guidelines have been prepared by the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission of Canada to assist those who are preparing for occasions when Lutherans and Anglicans are worshipping together in this new relationship of full communion.
Principles of Common Planning
As both of our churches are rooted in the liturgical heritage of the West and in the Reformation, and are active participants in the liturgical movement, there is a great deal which we have in common in our present worship patterns. We both stress the centrality of both Word and Sacrament. There is a common shape to our eucharistic liturgies. We both use the Revised Common Lectionary. Nevertheless, we do have different traditions, and it will be important for worship planners to be sensitive to these differences. What is comfortable and familiar to one community may feel uncomfortable and unfamiliar to another.
It is important that a spirit of graciousness and mutuality mark the planning of shared worship. Planning should take place well in advance and should include both lay and ordained leadership from both churches. Ample time should be given to build community in the group so that people are comfortable naming their concerns and seeking to understand the tradition of the other. Similarly, resources prepared for the congregation should enable everyone to feel at home in the liturgy. A spirit of hospitality should prevail.
Proclamation of the Word of God is at the heart of our full communion. Ample opportunity to read, sing, preach and hear the Gospel should be included in every experience of shared worship. Proclamation through preaching on biblical texts shall be central.
According to the definition of full communion "communicant members of each church [are] able freely to communicate at the altar of the other, and there [is] freedom of ordained ministers to officiate sacramentally in either church." (1) There is also "freedom to use each other's liturgies (2) ", subject to normal approval processes in each church. Thus, from now on, there is general approval of both churches for the standard worship books of each to be used in the other (Book of Common Prayer, Book of Alternative Services and Supplementary Eucharistic Prayers; Lutheran Book of Worship and With One Voice. Each church will consult with the other before authorizing future standard liturgical texts.
In the Anglican Church of Canada, standard texts which will be used for the whole church are normally prepared by the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee, vetted by the House of Bishops, and brought to the General Synod for approval. Eucharistic liturgies used on particular occasions would need approval from the diocesan bishop, but even texts approved by the General Synod need to be authorized by the diocesan bishop for use in that diocese. Thus, while there is general approval for the ELCIC standard worship books, in Anglican practice the diocesan bishop reserves the right of approval in their diocese. In the ELCIC, the national church has responsibility for developing the worship life of the church, providing or recommending service books and other material for congregational and personal use, while pastors have primary responsibility for liturgy at the local level.
There will be several different contexts for this joint worship. There will be local, regional, or national services which are held in common. There will be special occasions when one congregation hosts another, and there will be some congregations in which Lutherans and Anglicans worship together all the time ('shared ministries'). Each of these situations raises particular questions for worship planners. Suggestions for these contexts, and for particular kinds of rites (services of word and prayer, Eucharist, Baptism, and the renewal of baptismal vows) are given below.
Contexts and Occasions
A. In a parish context
There are many occasions in the year when common worship in a parish setting may be appropriate. At the parish level, one congregation may invite another to join them for worship at any time. The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity has already become a traditional opportunity, but there are many others. Congregations may celebrate some of the Holy Week liturgies together. They may share in Advent or Lent mid-week services and in Advent or Christmas carol services. They may jointly celebrate All Saints' Day, with its emphasis on one communion and fellowship in the Body of Christ. In some places they share all or part of the Easter Vigil, the ancient Easter Eve liturgy of light, word, baptism, and eucharist. Some congregations may worship together when one of them is without its usual leadership, for instance during the summer or holiday season. Sometimes the opportunity is suggested by the visit of a delegation from another church or country. Worship together may also take place in situations of pastoral care, when members of the two churches are to be married, or at the funeral of a member of one congregation whose spouse belongs to another. Sometimes, in isolated areas, the ordained leader of one church may provide such ministry for members of the other.
When a congregation of one tradition invites a congregation of the other tradition to worship, normally the liturgy of the host church shall be used. Leaders from both congregations shall participate as an expression of mutuality and full communion.
B. Special Joint Worship
During conferences, study days, and special celebrations involving members of both churches, worship together is encouraged as a sign of full communion.
At regional worship events or special joint worship services, planners shall take great care to adapt existing liturgies in a way that reflects the common structure of the eucharist and also respects the integrity and sensibilities of each tradition. The service used in Waterloo on July 2001, "A Celebration of Full Communion for Anglicans and Lutherans", is commended as a model for such a joint service.
C. Shared Ministries
In shared ministries, where Lutherans and Anglicans form one congregation or share a minister, there will be agreement between the two bishops as to which liturgies are normally permitted. New liturgies that may be developed shall reflect the common structure of the eucharist and the integrity and sensibilities of each tradition and are subject to the approval of the diocesan and synodical bishop as required. Further guidelines may be developed for such situations by the Joint Commission.
Roles of Leadership
When Anglicans and Lutherans worship together:
All services should have full active participation of a variety of ministers, lay and ordained. All should vest according to their own tradition.
Ministers shall exercise their liturgical function according to the rubrics of the liturgy being used. When there is a joint liturgy, ministers from each tradition shall exercise their ministries according to the role they have in their own tradition.
There shall be one presider, who at eucharistic services must be an ordained pastor, priest or bishop. Normally the preacher will be from the other tradition.
When bishops of both churches are present, it is only appropriate for one bishop from each church (the one who has jurisdiction) to use a pastoral staff. An Anglican and a Lutheran bishop may give the closing benediction together.
Guidelines for Specific Liturgical Celebrations
a) Celebrations of the Eucharist
In most cases it is appropriate to use the liturgy of one or other of the churches involved in the celebration of the eucharist. In a few cases it may be better to develop a rite based on existing liturgical forms, reflecting the traditional structure of the eucharist. (3)
Gathering
- Greeting
- (Hymn of Praise)
- Prayer of the Day
The Word of God (4)
- (Old Testament Reading)
- (Psalm)
- (New Testament Reading)
- Gospel
(Apostles' or Nicene Creed)
The Prayers
- Intercessions, Thanksgiving, Petitions
- The Exchange of the Peace
The Holy Communion
- Preparation of the Table
- The Great Thanksgiving
- The Lord's Prayer
- Breaking of the Bread
- Communion
Commissioning
- Thanksgiving for Communion and Prayer for Mission
- (Blessing)
- Dismissal
The two churches have different traditions on confession and absolution. A penitential rite may precede the service or may precede the exchange of the peace. Alternatively, confession and prayer for forgiveness may be included in the intercessions. (5)
Local worship planners should determine the recipient of the offering, giving particular consideration to shared mission possibilities. The offering may include money and other gifts such as food for a local pantry or blankets for a shelter. (6)
Sufficient quantities of the eucharistic elements shall be brought to the table, either by placing them on the table or by having assisting ministers, lay and ordained, standing in close proximity to the table, hold the elements to be consecrated.
Regarding the elements themselves, "Lutherans traditionally use bread and wine in the celebration of the Lord's Supper. In certain circumstances grape juice is used." (7) It is not, however, the practice of the Anglican Church to use grape juice as an alternative to wine in the eucharistic celebration: "The Bread shall be the best and purest wheat bread, whether leavened or unleavened, and the Wine pure grape wine, wherewith a little water may be mingled." (8) While communicants in both churches normally receive from the loaf and the cup, both traditions affirm that under certain circumstances "the reception of only one element is acceptable." (9)
While practices vary in our churches, "a loaf of bread and the common cup are rich biblical symbols of the unity of the church." (10)
Assisting ministers (ordained or lay) may stand with the presider during the eucharistic prayer but should not participate in the recitation of the words of the Great Thanksgiving or in gestures related to the blessing of the elements.
When the eucharist is celebrated together, the sacrament is offered to all the baptized present. All those welcome at the table in their own churches should be welcomed in a shared service, subject to the eucharistic practices of the churches from which visitors may come. (11)
"The elements are offered for the celebration of the Lord's Supper have been set aside for a special purpose. Leftover elements are consumed by those present, or disposed of in an appropriate manner." (12) "Any remaining consecrated bread and wine, (unless reserved for communing of persons not present) is consumed at the end of the distribution. This is appropriately done at the credence table or in the sacristy." (13)
b) Celebrations of the Word and Prayer (14)
When Congregations join for celebrations of the Word and prayer, normally the rite of the host church is used. If, however, the occasion warrants the use of a common rite, a structure such as the following may be used:
Gathering (15)
- Canticle or Hymn of Praise
The Word of God
- Psalm
- Reading
- (Hymn, Canticle, or Anthem)
- (Reading)
- Gospel Canticle or Hymn (16)
Prayers
- Intercessions, Thanksgivings, and Petitions
- Collect
- Lord's Prayer
Dismissal
- Hymn
- Blessing
The service books of both traditions contain material which may be used within this structure. Hymns should be drawn from the traditions of both churches. Liturgical material should be chosen which is suitable for the time of day and the season of the church's year. The prayers should reflect concern for the cultures and contexts of the participants, for their local communities and concerns, but also for the world context and for global issues of justice and peace.
Guidelines for Baptism, Renewal of Baptismal Vows, Marriage, and Funerals, installations/celebrations of new ministry, and other occasions will be developed later by the Joint Commission. Until further guidelines are developed, it is recommended that the liturgy of the host church or the presider be used.
Resources
Anglican
Book of Common Prayer
Book of Alternative Services
Occasional Celebrations
Supplementary Eucharistic Prayers and Services of the Word
Common Praise
Book of Common Praise 1938
Lutheran
Lutheran Book of Worship
LBW Minister's Desk Edition
LBW Manual on the Liturgy
With One Voice
Occasional Services
ELCIC Statement on Sacramental Practices
Hymnal Supplement 1991
Conclusion
These guidelines are subject to approval by the ELCIC National Church Council and the ACC Council of the General Synod.
Please send comments to:
Rev'd Cindy Halmarson, ELCIC National Office, 302-393 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6 chalmar@elcic.ca 204-984-9156
Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, General Synod, 600 Jarvis St., Toronto ON M4Y 2J6 abarnettcowan@national.anglican.ca 416-924-9199 ext. 281
[Footnotes]
(1) `Waterloo Declaration' Preface para. 7
(2) `Ibid'.
(3) The structure in this section is based on The Anglican-Lutheran International Commission, `Guidelines for Anglican-Lutheran Worship' (London, UK: The Anglican Communion Office of Communication, 1993), §6.2.
(4) Readings may be taken from the lectionaries of the two churches or chosen for the occasion. While both traditions expect at least a reading from the gospels to accompany the celebration of the eucharist, it is appropriate to precede the reading of the gospel by another reading.
(5) The Anglican-Lutheran International Commission, `Guidelines for Anglican-Lutheran Worship' (London, UK: The Anglican Communion Office of Communication, 1993), §6.2.
(6) `www.elca.org/ea/Relationships/episcopalian/guidelines.html' (accessed 4 February 2002).
(7) `Statement on Sacramental Practices' (Winnipeg, MB: Division for Parish Life of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, 1991), §6.15.
(8) `Book of Common Prayer', Anglican Church of Canada (Toronto, The Anglican Book Centre, 1959).
(9) `Statement on Sacramental Practices' (Winnipeg, MB: Division for Parish Life of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, 1991), §6.16.
(10) `Statement on Sacramental Practices' (Winnipeg, MB: Division for Parish Life of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, 1991), §6.17.
(11) `www.elca.org/ea/Relationships/episcopalian/guidelines.html' (accessed 4 February 2002).
(12) `Statement on Sacramental Practices' (Winnipeg, MB: Division for Parish Life of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, 1991), §6.22.
(13) `Book of Alternative Services', Anglican Church of Canada. Toronto: Anglican Book Centre, 1985, p. 184.
(14) The guidelines in this section are based on The Anglican-Lutheran International Commission, `Guidelines for Anglican-Lutheran Worship' (London, UK: The Anglican Communion Office of Communication, 1993), §6.1.
(15) The readings may be chosen from the lectionaries of one of the churches or chosen for their appropriateness to the occasion.
(16) The Gospel canticles are the Song of Zechariah (`Benedictus'), the Song of Mary (`Magnificat'), and the Song of Simeon (`Nunc dimittis').
Subjects
Anglican Lutheran Joint Commission
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Worship - Anglican Church of Canada
Worship - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Less detail

Anglican-Lutheran Joint Communion Agreement : Synod Highlight and Ecumenical Milestone

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7709
Date
2001 July 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2001 July 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Waterloo Ontario, 8 July 2001 -- An exuberant service of joint worship between Anglicans and Lutherans here today marked the capstone of celebrations concluding nearly two decades of discussions culminating in this week's historic entente between Canada's two largest episcopally-based protestant religious denominations.
The historic celebration of [the] Eucharist at Waterloo's civic stadium, bringing together more than 1,000 members of the two churches attending their respective national conventions, represented the first joint worship service following the successful passage, on July 6 [2001], of "The Waterloo Declaration", extending mutual recognition and full communion rights between the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC).
Throughout the week at adjacent university campus locations in this southwestern Ontario city for their respective national governing council meetings, Anglicans and Lutherans held simultaneous votes, with all but unanimous support, on the carefully-framed declaration of cooperation -- "The Waterloo Declaration : Called to Full Communion" -- which had been under extensive discussion and review by both churches since the mid-1980s.
"This marks a pivotal moment in the movement toward Christian ecumenism in Canada, and a landmark in the history of the Anglican Church," said Archbishop Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada following the all-but-unanimous vote at the 36th meeting of Anglican General Synod. "For me personally, it marks the climax of nearly 30 years of personal hopes and aspirations."
Bishop Telmor Sartison, ELCIC National Bishop and Lutheran counterpart to the Anglican Primate, said following the vote at the ELCIC convention, "it was so moving, it was hard to hold back the tears of happiness". In a sign of the times, the two bishops announced the outcome of their respective ballots in a cellphone conversation relayed to cheers and applause from more than 300 delegates attending both Anglican Synod and the Lutheran Convention.
The Waterloo Declaration -- so named because both ACC and ELCIC delegates held simultaneous national conferences in this namesake city in anticipation of a successful outcome on inter-church partnership -- sets out terms under which Anglicans and Lutherans acknowledge a broad range of parities between their respective denominations, both forged during the Reformation in 16th century Europe.
While stopping short of a "merger" or "union" between the two churches, "The Waterloo Declaration" formally acknowledges agreement on a wide range of liturgical issues, establishes full interchangeability between clergy of both churches and permits full "communion rights" among members of each denomination.
The agreement creates a religious fellowship numbering more than one million formally registered church members throughout Canada, linking the ACC's official parish membership of well over 700,000 with the ELCIC's membership of more than 200,000. Official statistics of church membership are difficult to assess accurately. In the case of the ACC, official Census Canada statistics list the number of Anglicans at more than 2.2 million while parish membership of regular attendees produces the smaller statistic.
This week's Anglican-Lutheran cooperation agreement mirrors similar ecumenical partnerships already forged between Anglicans in Great Britain and Lutherans in Scandinavian countries, as well, between the two denominations in the United States.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Anthony Whittingham, ACC Communications, 416-924-9199 ext. 324; 6416-738-8909 (Mobile)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (36th : 2001 : Waterloo, Ont.)
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Full communion
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecumenical movement - Canada
Waterloo Declaration
Anglican Church of Canada - Statistics
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Statistics
Less detail

Anglican-Lutheran ministries thrive and offer diversity

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33242
Author
Mikelic, Peter
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2006 January
Author
Mikelic, Peter
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2006 January
Volume
132
Issue
1
Page
5
Notes
Article outlines some of the two dozen co-operative Anglican-Lutheran ministries currently operating as a result of the Waterloo Declaration. Among these is the "newly amalgamated Anglican-Lutheran congregation known as Trinity Church ... formed March 28, 2004 in Port Alberni Valley, B.C. Formerly All Saints Anglican and St. Alban/Christ the King (already a previously combined Anglican/Lutheran parish in 2000) .... Served by Anglican Minister Dianne Tomalin". "Jim Halmarson, a Lutheran, serves as the rector of Christ Church Anglican in Saskatoon, a congregation that will be celebrating its centenary in 2007." "Another joint ministry is Holy Cross Lutheran Mission in Orillia, Ont., which utilizes space at the Orillia South parishes of St. Athanasius and St. David's." "The last mutual venture highlighted here is at Zion Lutheran Church in Beausejour, Man., where Anglican priest Hugh Laidlaw is the pastor since August 2003".
Subjects
Waterloo Declaration
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Shared ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Shared ministry - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Trinity Anglican Lutheran Church (Port Alberni, B.C.)
St. David's Anglican Church (Orillia, Ont.)
Holy Cross Lutheran Church (Orillia, Ont.)
Christ Church Anglican (Saskatoon, Sask.)
Zion Lutheran Church (Beausejour, Man.)
Tomalin, Dianne
Halmarson, Jim
Harrington, Pam
Laidlaw, Hugh
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Anglican serves at Luther College

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30930
Author
De Santis, Solange
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2003 November
Author
De Santis, Solange
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2003 November
Volume
129
Issue
9
Page
15
Notes
The Rev. Cheryl Kristolaitis became the first Anglican cleric to be officially called to a position in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada when she became chaplain at Luther College in Regina.
Part of Focus on Education Supplement.
Subjects
Toth, Cheryl (Cheryl Still Kristolaitis)
College chaplains - Anglican Church of Canada
College chaplains - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Luther College (Regina, Sask.)
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112 records – page 1 of 12.