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0.7% Development Goal

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8948
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 28
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 28
Mover
Archdeacon Dennis Drainville
Seconder
Bishop Jim Njegovan
Text
That this General Synod
1. Affirm the Development Goal of the United Nations for each developed country to contribute 0.7% of its gross national product to Official Development Assistance (ODA) in developing countries.
2. Request the General Secretary to write to the Government of Canada by June 30, 2004, urging it to act on the 0.7% Development Goal, using the proposal of the Canadian Council of International Cooperation for reaching this goal by 2015:
- To increase foreign aid by 12% annually between 2009 -- an additional $750 million over the next three years to increases already planned
- To increase foreign aid by 15% between 2009-2015.
3. Affirm the challenge of the 1998 Lambeth Conference to dioceses and provinces of the Anglican Communion to provide 0.7% of their own resources to fight global poverty.
4. Request the Primate
- to encourage Anglicans to give their generous support to the PWRDF and Anglican Appeal, which together with the Partnerships budget of General Synod, represent the Anglican Church of Canada's financial commitment to supporting international development programs, fighting poverty, and strengthening international and intra-Anglican partnerships.
- to report to the Anglican Communion by August 31, 2004, through the Task Team on Poverty and Trade, on the Anglican Church of Canada's contributions to development and poverty work to help give a complete picture of the Anglican Communion's efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. CARRIED WITHOUT DEBATE Act 28
Subjects
Economic assistance - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic assistance - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Economic assistance, Canadian
Church and development - Anglican Church of Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Millennium Development Goals
Less detail

21. The Church and Public Social Responsibility

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2875
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Berry
Seconder
Garnsworthy
Text
That the National Executive Council recognizes the widespread concern of the Church about social and economic problems in Canada and abroad, requests the Primate to convene a three-day seminar to include such members as the corporate and business community, members of the Unit of Public Social Responsibility, Native people, Labour leaders, Third World representatives and members of the National Executive Council and requests that costs be shared by participating groups. CARRIED
Subjects
Economic justice - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
Social justice - Canada
Corporate social responsibility - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and social problems - Canada
Less detail

22. Pension Committee

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2878
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1977 May 3-6
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
McPherrin
Seconder
Huggill
Text
That the National Executive Council approve in principle the following statement and refer it to the Resolutions Committee of General Synod for inclusion into the discussion of the report of the Task Force "For the Elimination of Poverty and Social Injustice":
- 'Any program to support income levels in Canada should specifically differentiate between those Canadians who are a part of the work force and those who are retired. In particular such a program should:
- 1) ensure that the retirement income of those who contributed to a private pension plan or any similar retirement program normally would exceed the income of those who did not.
- 2) ensure that there are clear financial incentives to all those who prepare for their financial security in retirement by participating in any pension or other retirement program.' CARRIED
Notes
The Primate expressed gratitude to the Pension Committee for its excellent and competent work.
Archdeacon Hobson took this opportunity to thank the members of the Pension staff and stated that much credit should go to them for their work.
Subjects
Pensions - Anglican Church of Canada
Pensions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poverty - Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Guaranteed annual income - Canada
Guaranteed annual income - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Bishops Express Concern Over Economy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3191
Date
1981 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1981 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Nov. 10, 1981 -- For immediate release
"The very real suffering being endured by large numbers of Canadians" has moved the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada to "call for justice and a sharing of our resources."
In a statement sent today to the Prime Minister, Mr. Clark and Mr. Broadbent the Bishops expressed concern not only about inflation and high interest rates, but also about "Government restraints imposed on schools and universities."
The Bishops represent thirty dioceses of the Church in Canada, from coast to coast. They were meeting last week in Pierrefonds, Quebec.
The full text of their statement is enclosed.
- 30 -
R.J. Berryman
600 Jarvis St.
Toronto, Ont. M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192
Notes
The House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada feels a deep concern for the welfare of Canadians at this period in our history.
We commend Federal and Provincial leaders for the new initiative to strengthen our unity as a people. However, we are increasingly disturbed by the very real suffering being endured by large numbers of Canadians who are losing their homes because of high mortgage rates. The daily struggle with inflation and high interest rates affects those least able to cope - our senior citizens and families on low income. We share a deep concern over high unemployment especially of young Canadians who are our future. Coupled with this, Government restraints imposed on schools and universities mean that fewer young people will receive the benefits of educational opportunity to prepare them for a complex society in which they will need more education, not less.
The bishops do not pretend to have answers which Parliamentarians and economists have not discovered but we do claim that the Christian gospel has insights for such a time as this; our faith predicates that Christians have the obligation to be involved in society and the Church has the duty to call for justice and a sharing of our resources in order that the greatest good for the greatest number may be secured.
We believe that we live in a fortunate land and that Christians should be foremost in supporting the unity of Canada and in sensitivity to our differences which can offer us strength and a rich mosaic of life.
We hold that every Canadian has the right to be employed and to be decently housed and that Christian people have the duty to press government to that necessary goal.
We hold the thesis that our young people are one of our greatest assets and that all of us must share the struggle to ensure the best future possible for them.
We realise the cost involved but would commend the Christian imperative to share for the general good of all.
Subjects
Canada - Economic conditions - 1971-
Economics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Unemployment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Less detail

Anglicans in Seattle

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article27384
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2000 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2000 March
Volume
126
Issue
3
Page
7
Notes
Three Anglican priests from British Columbia attended protests and an interfaith service in Seattle.
Subjects
Marquardt, Margaret
World Trade Organization
Anglican Church of Canada. Eco-Justice Committee
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

APEC Forum fails Christian criteria for just and moral economy -- Anglicans

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7017
Date
1997 November 18
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1997 November 18
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
VANCOUVER, November 18, 1997 -- The Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum falls far short of Christian criteria for just development and a moral economy, according to members of the Anglican Church's EcoJustice Committee.
Canada will host the next round of APEC talks in Vancouver next week (November 23-25). The stated intention of the forum is admirable. According to the leaders statement after the 1996 forum, in Manila, it is: "to enrich the lives and improve the standards of living of all citizens on a substantial basis." However, the nature of the forum belies this goal in several important ways:
- its definition of "standard of living" is rigidly limited to a strictly economic understanding. Member countries are referred to as "economies" and political representatives as "economic leaders". In this perspective, "citizens" are reduced to "consumers";
- business leaders are given a privileged consultative status in the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC), but the voices of other citizens are absent. The perspectives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), labour and social groups are specifically excluded;
- even by APEC's limited definition, many topics with enormous economic significance are specifically excluded. For example, the environmental consequences of economic activity are never discussed with reference to minimum environmental standards. Similarly, labour standards and even basic human rights have been excluded from the talks;
- fundamental political issues, including questions of the rights of indigenous peoples, are excluded. Two recent Canadian court decisions have shown that indigenous rights to natural resources can have dramatic economic impacts;
- in keeping with objectives stated after last year's APEC forum, the Vancouver discussions are expected to lead to further privatization, deregulation and reduction of "costs of doing business". In the past, this has been achieved by reducing minimum wages, reducing or eliminating social programs and safety nets, and removing policies for environmental protection;
- the discussions take place behind closed doors, and no actual legislation or proposal is ever presented to Parliament for public debate. Since APEC is not accountable to any Canadian public institution, it represents a fundamentally undemocratic process.
"The economy is a faith issue," says the Reverent Margaret Marquardt, chair of the EcoJustice Committee. "The economy is a major governing factor in the lives of all peoples, regardless of what part of the planet we occupy. The priorities and objectives of any economic initiative are therefore faith concerns.
"As Christians we are called to put the dignity and sacredness of human life at the centre of all our actions. As Christians we are called to share the earth's riches, while caring for creation itself. As Christians we are motivated by an ethic of cooperation. It is the assessment of this committee that APEC's aims and methods are contrary to these goals.
"How can we talk about economics apart from its relationship with a people, a nation, a land ? From a Christian perspective -- and, we would have thought, a political one -- it is impossible to separate economic investment from its impact on communities. It is impossible to separate economic activity from its effect on those who work in it."
Marquardt suggests it is fair to ask elected political leaders how their participation in APEC will "advance the standard of living of all citizens," and particularly:
- what will happen to workers in Canada and elsewhere as liberalized trade tends increasingly to the reduction or elimination of minimum wages ?
- how will our standard of living be improved as standards of environmental protection are eliminated ?
- APEC systematically refuses to include, refer to, or advocate respect for basic human rights. As we deal more and more closely with repressive governments or regimes, what assurance do we have that Canada's human rights will not come to be viewed as an excessive cost of doing business ?
- how and when will the people whose lives are most affected be heard ?
"To view countries as economies and citizens as primarily consumers is to deny our humanity and to deny the web of mutuality in which we live, in communities which must be sustained," says Marquardt. "We believe there are fair trade and development alternatives. That is why we support Canadian churches and many other NGOs in their efforts to organize an effective People's Summit to do what the Government of Canada has failed to do: make the voices of citizens heard on these crucial issues."
The People's Summit, also in Vancouver, runs from November 17-24, 1997, with additional ecumenical events scheduled for November 25, 1997.
The EcoJustice Committee is a national committee of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada. It is mandated by General Synod to work on issues of economic and social justice, peace and the integrity of creation.
- 30 -
For further information, contact: The Rev. Margaret Marquardt, Chair, EcoJustice Committee Tel: (604) 874-5030
Joy Kennedy, Coordinator, EcoJustice Tel: (416) 924-9199 ext. 202 FAX: (416) 924-3483
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources: 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, Editor, Print Resources: 416-924-9199 ext. 256
Subjects
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)
Economics - Moral and ethical aspects
Economics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Human rights - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Conservation of natural resources - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Eco-Justice Committee
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Arctic bishop appeals to premier

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article22313
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1997 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1997 March
Volume
123
Issue
3
Page
7
Notes
The executive committee of the Diocese of the Arctic passed a motion expressing its concern with the economic cutbacks of the Northwest Territories.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of the Arctic
Williams, Christopher (John Christopher Richard), 1936-
Poverty - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

'A vision of enough'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39932
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 December
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 December
Volume
142
Issue
10
Page
1, 10
Notes
"On October 18 [2016], an Anglican Church of Canada task force released 'On the Theology of Money', a report calling the faithful to embrace a 'vision of enough' when it comes to material wealth. Many Christians in the 21st century are torn between their faith, which teaches that hoarding wealth is wrong and that Christians should support each other, and an economic system that values individualism, limitless growth and commodification, says the Rev. Maggie Helwig, a priest in the diocese of Toronto and member of the task force. Using biblical texts, early church teaching, contemporary theology and political theory, Helwig's essay 'Non nobis, Domine' (Not to us, Lord) provides the main substance of the report, a result of two years of research, reflection and study" (p. 1, 10). "Helwig's essay acknowledges, however, that living outside the market is not feasible" (p. 10). Helwig urges Christians to change the current economic order "through small actions, like living less wasteful lives and being satisfied with fewer possessions, and more systematic changes, like 'declining to participate in interest-based investment profits, or at least investing in credit unions that support community initiative' (p. 10)". "The origins of the report go back to the 2010-2013 triennium, when the Occupy Wall Street movement drew attention to rising economic equality in Western nations" (p. 10) "A task force, chaired by the Rev. Jeff Metcalfe, of the diocese of Quebec, was set up to discuss what a Christian approach to money might look like" (p. 10).
The 33-page report can be downloaded from the Anglican Church of Canada website: http://www.anglican.ca/wp-content/uploads/On-the-theology-of-money.pdf.
Subjects
Money - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Wealth - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Capitalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Helwig, Maggie, 1961-
Metcalfe, Jeffrey
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on the Theology of Money
Less detail

Bishops Oppose Goods and Services Tax, Call for Progressive Tax Policy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1626
Date
1990 February 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1990 February 9
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Mississauga -- The House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada makes the following statement concerning the Goods and Services Tax (GST) based on the scriptural principle: "Much is required from the person to whom much is given; much more is required from the person to whom much more is given." (Luke 12:48)
The bishops reaffirm their statement of October 1989 on taxation policy:
That this House of Bishops, out of concern for the more vulnerable members of society, affirm the principle of progressive taxation, whereby those with greater wealth pay a higher proportionate amount of taxes than those with lesser means, and oppose the principle of regressive taxation, whereby those of lesser means are required to pay the same percentage tax as the wealthiest income earners...
Consequently the bishops oppose the proposed GST legislation because we believe the poor will pay a disproportionately large amount of their income; and the reverse will be true for affluent people.
We ask the Government of Canada to consider alternatives that, in our view, are more just, such as:
1. making personal income tax more progressive;
2. instituting a corporate income tax based on ability to pay;
3. considering an annual tax on net wealth such as is used in most European countries;
4. reconsidering its position on inheritance tax.
Notes
For further information, contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Communications, (416) 924-9192 (bus.), (416) 335-8349 (res.)
Subjects
Goods and services tax - Canada
Taxation - Canada
Taxation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada reviews
Economic justice - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Less detail

105 records – page 1 of 11.