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'A time of crisis and opportunity'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38769
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 February
Author
Folkins, Tali
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2016 February
Volume
142
Issue
2
Page
1, 7
Notes
"In the wake of the climate change agreement reached in Paris December 12 [2015], Anglican and ecumenical leaders in Canada say they're looking to the future with new hope -- as well as concern that the deal will be translated into action. While in action to meet Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, travelled by train to Paris to take part in a special climate change-themed ecumenical service. The occasion gave him a change to talk with people involved in the Paris conference, he said, and hope was a big theme of these discussions" (p. 1). "In Paris on behalf of the Canadian Council of Churches (CCC) was Joy Kennedy, chair of the CCC's commission on justice and peace" (p. 7). "In each country, the onus may be on people and organizations to keep up the pressure to make sure their leaders stay on track, Thompson [Henriette Thompson, director, public witness for social and ecological justice, Anglican Church of Canada] said. It may also require some personal sacrifices, and one important role for the church in the time to come, she said, will be to allay people's anxiety, 'especially as members of our own church in Canada will be suffering directly the economic impact in the form of the loss of jobs' that is likely to follow in this country's energy sector" (p. 7).
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Christianity
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Climatic changes - Government policy
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Conference of the Parties (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) (21st : 2015 : Paris, France)
Hiltz, Fred (Frederick James), 1953-
Kennedy, Joy, 1948-
Thompson, Henriette
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'Between the flood and the rainbow'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33914
Author
Babbitt, Bruce
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1996 August
Author
Babbitt, Bruce
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1996 August
Volume
3
Issue
2
Page
22
Notes
"The following is excerpted from the keynote address last spring by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to the annual convention of the Associated Church Press, of which the Anglican Journal is a member. Mr. Babbitt's speech, entitled 'Leading America closer to the promise of God's covenant' was about the role that spirituality and church members can play in maintaining, or all too frequently, restoring the integrity of the environment -- God's creation. Though set in a U.S. context, the address, especially its conclusion, which is reprinted here below [not included in electronic database], contained enough practical advice by a seasoned civil servant to be of interest to Canadian church members".
"Finally, we can remember that conservation did not begin as a partisan, or even a political issue. Nor did it begin on Earth Day. It began in the time between the flood and the rainbow, a time that begins with the break of each new day. You can help by asking your leaders, your congregations, and yourselves to transcend the narrow partisan differences, which can only drive us back towards destruction, and instead uphold our moral obligation as stewards of God's creation, which can only bring us closer to the hope and renewal that was and is the promise of His covenant".
Subjects
Ecology - United States
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Christianity
Conservation of natural resources
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Earth Prayers : From Around the World, 365 Prayers, Poems, and Invocations for Honoring the Earth

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog1542
Publication Date
c1991
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BL 438.2 E29 1991
Edition
1st ed.
Place
San Francisco CA
Publisher
HarperCollins
Publication Date
c1991
Physical_Description
xxiv, 452 p.
Material Type
Book
Notes
Edited by Elizabeth Roberts and Elias Amidon.
Includes "Index of First Lines": pp. 428-439.
Added Entry
Roberts, Elizabeth, ed.
Amidon, Elias, ed.
Subjects
Earth - Religious aspects
Earth - Prayer-books and devotions - English
Nature - Religious aspects
Nature - Prayer-books and devotions - English
Devotional calendars
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Prayer-books and devotions - English
Environmental Sabbath - Prayer-books and devotions - English
ISBN
0-06-250746-X
Call Number
BL 438.2 E29 1991
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
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First Nations faith and ecology

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog3523
Author
Rajotte, Freda
Publication Date
1998
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
GF 80 R3 F5 1998
Author
Rajotte, Freda
Place
Toronto ON and London
Publisher
Anglican Book Centre; United Church Publishing House; Cassell
Publication Date
1998
Physical_Description
x, 117 p. : ill., map ; 23.3 x 15.2 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Freda Rajotte".
Includes bibliographical endnotes and bibliography: pp. 113-116.
"This book began several years ago during discussions in a publishing house in London, England. A series of books had been produced on major world faiths and ecology. We in CCEER (Canadian Coalition for Ecology, Ethics and Religion) felt very strongly that any such series would only be appropriate in North America if it began with a volume on First Nations Faith and Ecology." -- Preface, p. vii.
"For the First Nations peoples of North America, the natural world of mountains, prairies, seas and lakes is their primary source of spiritual nourishment and revelation. People understand themselves as living within, and being part of the balanced ecology of creation. This book illustrates, in stories, prayers, art and teaching, the close and symbolic relationship that First Nations share with places and creatures around them. [Contains] new ideas and ways of relating to creation [and] a resource for storytelling, artwork and discussion in schools, colleges, and churches." -- back cover.
Contents: Preface -- Living the Sacred Story -- Creation -- The Sacred Circle of Life -- Animals are Sacred -- The Broken Hoop -- Mending the Hoop -- Healing the Spirit -- The Land: Ravage, Repatriation and Resurrection -- Faith and Vision -- Chief Seattle's Speech -- Notes -- References -- Bannock: A Traditional First Nations Food.
Series
World religions and ecology
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects
Human ecology - Religious aspects
Nature - Religious aspects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Religion
Environmental protection - Moral and ethical aspects
Indigenous peoples - Attitudes
Indigenous peoples in conservation of natural resources - Canada
ISBN
0-304-70312-5 (Cassell)
Call Number
GF 80 R3 F5 1998
Location
General Synod Archives
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First Nations Faith and Ecology

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/2589
Author
Rajotte, Freda
Publication Date
1998
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
MM29.7 .R34
Author
Rajotte, Freda
Place
Toronto
Publisher
Anglican Book Centre
Publication Date
1998
Physical_Description
x, 117 p. : illus.
Material Type
Book
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Religion
Ecology - Religious aspects
Nature - Religious aspects
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
MM29.7 .R34
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New moral-based social movement to tackle environment, climate change issues

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39851
Author
Babych, Art
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 November
Author
Babych, Art
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 November
Volume
136
Issue
9
Page
6
Notes
"With little fanfare and scant media attention, a new social movement appears to be evolving in Canada to address issues of environmental decline and climate change from a moral, ethical and justice perspective. Headed by an Anglican priest, the Rev. Dr. Mishka Lysack, the first 'retreat' was held in Calgary last October and video-linked to Edmonton. Since then, a series of events have taken place in Toronto and Ottawa, the latest being an evening panel session at Saint Paul University on Oct. 1 [2010] followed by a workshop aimed at building leadership". "'What we're developing is a moral-based social movement which involves different religious and faith-based communities and very deliberately including those that are not just Christian but of other faith traditions', Lysack told the 'Anglican Journal' at the leadership retreat". "The movement is unique in what it has to offer because all the issues have a moral framework, he said. 'What does it mean to live a good life ? ... What does it mean to care for the earth, to worship God in ways that are faithful, respectful of each other and respectful of creation that God has created with us ?"
Subjects
Ecology - Canada
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecology - Moral and ethical aspects
Lysack, Mishka (Michael David), 1954-
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One body breathing one air

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39445
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 September
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2008 September
Volume
134
Issue
7
Page
10
Notes
"Faith groups need to 'dismantle the culture of feat that discourages civic encounters', says Rev. Giorgio Di Cecco, poet laureate of Toronto. The Roman Catholic priest believes that the environment can only be saved if people care about each other and surrender to the common good. 'We tend to treat the environment as an object and see nature as a thing that needs to be saved .. But as (environmentalist) David Suzuki says, "We are one body that breathes one air". Like it or not, we are dependent on each other', said Mr. Di Cecco". "Mr. Di Cecco, who has authored some 20 volumes of poetry and a book of manifestos on creative cities, spoke about 'The ecology of heart' at a forum on Greening Sacred Spaces sponsored in the spring [2008] in Toronto by Faith and the Common Good, a national group that encourages inter-faith action on social and environmental concerns". "Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada, also spoke at the conference and touched on issues of leadership, politics and faith". "Ms. May challenged the 200 people who attended the conference to vote and become more engaged in society's affairs. 'Imagine what's at stake if you don't', she said. She also lamented that religion is being 'demonized' in the media, when at its core, it is 'about being altruistic, connecting for the common good'."
Subjects
Ecology - Canada
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Greening Sacred Spaces
Faith and the Common Good
Di Cecco, Giorgio (Pier Giorgio), 1949-
May, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Evans) 1954-
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A Reflection on Creation Stories in Maori Tradition

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31480
Author
Callaghan, Moeawa
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2001 September
Author
Callaghan, Moeawa
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2001 September
Volume
2
Issue
1
Page
77-83
Notes
"This article looks at the popular versions of the Maori creation stories of the cosmos, the gods and humanity as recorded by the late 19th and early 20th century Maori scholar, Te Rangi Hiroa, Sir Peter Buck, and in the form that they have come to the present day" (p. 77). "In the popular Maori creation stories recorded by Buck there is no supreme deity. The concern in these stories is not creator and creation but the ancestral link through time from the beginning .... In the popular creation stories something is consistently emerging out of something. The cosmological argument that all natural things are dependent for their existence on something else rings true in Maori philosophy. Therefore essentially there is no difference between creator and creation" (p. 79). There is however a less well-known and more debatably authentic creation story about a creator "Io". "If the theory of a post-Christian construct is correct then the efforts of the theological Te Matorohanga, a converted Christian, and his school must me congratulated for successfully interpolating a new story into the older. Although in parts confusing, this version has had an incredible impact on the Maori theological standpoint. The theological implications of the Io version validate the emphasis on a creator god and creator god's creation. Creation does not take place without a creator god. The parallel to biblical theology places this theology within the bounds of the Christian concept of God" (p. 82). "In light of past discrepancies, the unification in theological thought of God and God's creation is indeed of central importance in Christian theology today. Unification of creator and creation is totally consistent with traditional Maori thought. The task of unification theological thought has been the endeavour of many late 20th century Christian theologians world-wide and I believe that it is to early indigenous theologies that we are indebted in this discussion. Genealogy reminds us that creation us of God and from God, not in the sense of ownership but in the sense of `whanau' relationship. Traditionally, `whanau' principles (humanity, reciprocity, sharing, caring, service, fulfilling one's social obligations, compassion, all under the umbrella of `aroha') have been central to the Maori world view. When we deny any person or other life form the right to fully express the life-giving attributes of `whanau' we deny our heritage and when we deny our heritage we deny God. The ability of humans to deny these principles is disturbingly reflected in our societies today" (pp. 82-83).
The author is Maori and an Anglican lay woman.
Subjects
Maori (New Zealand people) - Religion
Creation - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia
Indigenous peoples - Religion
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Religious leaders blow whistle on climate change : 'We take and take and give nothing back'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36291
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 September
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 September
Volume
135
Issue
7
Page
1, 3
Notes
"World religious leaders, meeting at the recent 2010 World Religious Summit in Winnipeg, sent up a big red flag on the issue of climate change. Whether Christian, Jew, Muslim, Hindu, Shinto, Buddhist, Indigenous or Bahai'i, they all agreed that climate change is a 'moral, ethical and spiritual' issue that has reached a time of great crisis". "In a statement, religious leaders called on government to take 'bold action' to address climate change, calling it 'an urgent manifestation of our collective abuse of the very environment that sustains the fullness of life'. Concrete actions must be implemented 'to ensure global average temperatures do not exceed a two degree centigrade increase from pre-industrial levels', the statement said." "In late July [2010], in what observers said was another example of the impact of climate change, Pakistan was hit by a devastating flood, which the Red Cross said was the worst to hit the country in 80 years. More than 1,500 people were killed and nearly three million displaced." "The poor are the most vulnerable to the drought, flooding and loss of crops that result from climate change, said the Rev. Francois Pihaate, of the Pacific Conference of Churches in his presentation to the world religions summit." "His Holiness Aram I, Catholicos of the Armenian Catholicosate of Cilicia, said 'Human beings have no right to possess and master creation', and called for 'a new economic paradigm .. that is compatible with nature's reproductive abilities'."
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Christianity
Climatic changes - Religious aspects
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - Christianity
World Religions Summit (2010 : Winnipeg, Man.)
Floods - Pakistan
Climatic changes - Environmental aspects
Aram I (Aram Keshishian), Catholicos of Cilicia, 1947-
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13 records – page 1 of 2.