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Anglican Bishops to have "Inside" Look at Corrections System

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1449
Date
1986 October 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1986 October 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Oct. 07, 1986 -- For immediate release
"What's a nice Bishop like you doing in a place like the Penitentiary?", may well be asked next month.
The members of the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada have a difficult task as chief Pastors in the face of the complexities of the moral issues of today's society. To assist them in this, the House meets periodically with experts in various fields, in what are known as Continuing Education events, to receive insight into the realities of many of the issues which confront the Church and society.
Two such areas of concern which have been the subjects of Continuing Education sessions of the House in the past were Bio-Medical Ethics and Human Sexuality.
In the first week of November the House will meet in Kingston, Ontario to consider the effects of the Canadian Corrections Service on its inmates, those who work in it and the society it is created to protect. A most impressive schedule of events and presentations has been planned to give the Bishops a personal in-depth experience of various aspects of the criminal justice and corrections system. A schedule of the three day session is enclosed.
The House reserves the right to declare any of its sessions in-camera. However, the Agenda and Continuing Education Committees of the House have suggested that all of these sessions should be open to the Media, subject to the concurrence of the House when it meets.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
The Rev. Canon Richard J. Berryman, Media Officer
Notes
HOUSE OF BISHOPS CONTINUING EDUCATION EVENT ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND CORRECTIONS
To be held at the Howard Johnson Motor Hotel, Kingston, Ont.
Tuesday, Nov. 04, 1986:
- 7:30 p.m. Reception to give the Bishops an opportunity to meet about 100 people from the John Howard Society, parole officers, prison guards, legal and judicial professions.
Wednesday, Nov. 05, 1986:
- 10:00 a.m. Presentation by Alex Himmelfard, Director of Research, Federal Justice Department, Ottawa -- An overview of the Justice System with special reference to Native People.
- 1:30 p.m. Simulated Court Case -- Trial on a Domestic Violence Case. Actual Proscuting Attorney, Defense Lawyers, etc.
-- Bishops will act as Judge -- decide guilt or innocence and sentence.
-- At conclusion a Judge will declare what his verdict would have been in the trial.
- 4:00 p.m. Theological Reflection on the day to that point.
- Evening The Bishops, in twos and threes, will visit the homes of families of prison guards, inmates, low income family housing, etc.
Thursday, Nov. o6, 1986:
- Morning -- The Bishops will visit six institutions in the Kingston area -- eg. Minimum, Medium and Maximum security facilities, Women's and Juvenile Detention Centres, etc.
- 1:30 p.m. Consideration (with panel of professionals) of Parole, Mandatory Release, etc. "How do inmates get out and what happens when they do ?"
- 7:30 p.m. Eucharist of Reconciliation in St. George's Cathedral.
-- Preacher: The Most Rev. Michael Peers, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - House of Bishops - Education (Continuing education)
Less detail

Anglicans join coalition on justice

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article15194
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 January
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1994 January
Volume
120
Issue
1
Page
7
Notes
The ACC has decided to join an ecumenical coalition dealing with criminal justice issues. CCJC analyzes justice policy and provides resources for congregations.
Subjects
Justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church Council on Justice and Corrections (Canada)
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Fraser, Irene
Less detail

[Brief on Imprisonment From Anglican Church Social Service Department]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5348
Date
1967 August 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1967 August 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Greater use of parole and the erasing of past criminal records after a specified period of successful rehabilitation are recommended in a brief prepared by the Anglican Church of Canada to the federal government's Canadian Committee on Corrections.
It states that imprisonment is being used excessively and inappropriate use is being made of existing prisons in relation to the philosophy of respect for the dignity and worth of all men and women.
A primary problem in that prison industries do not provide useful work for pay and are not related to the kind of work obtainable in society, it states.
The brief, submitted by the church's social service department, was prepared by men and women from Ottawa, Kingston, Toronto, London and Winnipeg. It will be reported to the church's national synod which meets in Ottawa, August 22-31.
Present practices of arrest, jail and bail discriminate against the poor, the brief states. Release from custody pending trial should be based on character rather than financial considerations. It says professional bondsmen should not be recognized in Canada. It suggests some social problems such as chronic petty offences, vagrancy, suicide, alcoholism and drug addiction be removed from the criminal code and dealt with by appropriate health and welfare authorities.
Provision for legal counsel for those unable to pay for it should be the responsibility of the public purse, the brief states. It recommends again the abolition of the lash and paddle and capital punishment.
The Anglican Church also passed a resolution in support of the abolition of capital punishment in 1958. Two years ago it published a booklet "The Death Penalty," an argument in favor of abolition, which was mailed to members of parliament before the free vote in the House of Commons.
"The entire correctional process should be governed by the Judaeo-Christian philosophy of unfailing respect for the dignity and worth of each human being, of concern for those who have offended and of constant hope for change and moral and spiritual growth in man. The embodiment of such a philosophy in a program of action requires flexibility in the system and provision for continuing evaluation," the committee said.
Freedom, encouragement and resources should be provided both prison staff and those outside the system to undertake research and experimentation, the report recommends.
- 30 -
Subjects
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1335
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Brown
Seconder
Bishop Conlin
Prologue
Moved by: Bishop Brown
Seconded by: Bishop Lawrence
That the Pastoral be considered and edited as necessary. CARRIED
It was agreed that the Reverend Don Brown should be requested to prepare a list of all Members of Parliament and distribute copies of the list to all the Bishops.
Text
That we accept this Pastoral on Capital Punishment. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL : TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
Violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society is shocked by the murder of police in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the person will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of us there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing execution where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- despite the common assumption that the death penalty functions as a deterrent, Canadian experience has shown that there has been no increase in the murder rate following the abolition of capital punishment, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be re-introduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual person before God.
Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our police and staff of correctional institutions we put them under almost overwhelming stress and this in turn may contribute to citizens feeling the need to take the law into their own hands. This could only lead to an increase in the spiral of violence.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God, a God of love who cares infinitely for every person.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
FEBRUARY, 1987.
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1384
Date
1985 February
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 4-2-85
Date
1985 February
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 4-2-85
Mover
Bishop Short
Seconder
Bishop Stiff
Prologue
Bishop Leonard Hatfield and the Rev. Christopher Carr were welcomed.
Bishop Hatfield reviewed the Report and addendum, noting changes which had been made in the light of suggestions made at the last meeting of the House.
The Primate shared a letter dated November, 1984, from Mr. Clyne Harradence, Vice-Chancellor of General Synod in which Mr. Harradence commended the Bishops for the high quality of the document.
In the discussion of the paper, further comments and suggestions were noted. Bishop Brown reported that there was some anger on the part of police officers regarding the Pastoral Letter because no concern was expressed for police and their families.
It was recognized that the current push for the return of the death penalty is, in part, due to an increasing concern for the victims of crime and their families, and justice for the victims must be seen to be done. It was noted that a National Committee to help the victims of crime and their families had been formed recently in Toronto.
Archbishop Scott reported on his recent meeting with Commissioner Yeomans of the National Correctional Services, and suggested that it might be useful to arrange for some private meetings with representatives from various police departments.
The implications of the reinstatement of the death penalty in relation to the Human Rights Code and the Charter of Rights were discussed. It was felt that, if capital punishment were reinstated, the justice system would uphold the statute if it were very clearly defined when capital punishment was called for.
It was noted that documentation is available through the office of the Rev. Donald Brown, Church House, and could be made available upon request.
Archbishop Scott spoke of the meeting which he had with leaders of other Churches and the Prime Minister where capital punishment was discussed. He reported that he stressed at the meeting that he was not expressing the opinion of the whole Canadian Anglican constituency.
Text
That we authorize the release of this report to the Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada, as revised in the light of discussion, for use at their discretion, as a study resource. CARRIED #4-2-85
Notes
It was agreed that the Pastoral Letter from the House of Bishops should be printed at the beginning of the paper, and that a preface, carefully prepared by the House, should be included.
Subjects
Capital punishment - Canada
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Harradence, Clyne (J.H. Clyne), 1923-2012
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1396
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Lackey
Seconder
Bishop Hannen
Text
That this Pastoral Letter be issued to the members of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Citizens of Canada. CARRIED. ONE OPPOSITION #7-10-84
Notes
It was agreed that copies of the Pastoral Letter on Capital Punishment should be sent to the leaders of the three Federal political parties. The Primate said that a mailing would go to all the clergy following the meeting of the National Executive Council, but that the Bishops are free to use the letter immediately and to release it to local papers.
It was agreed that clergy should be encouraged to read the letter in the Churches on a Sunday that is appropriate. The Diocesan Bishop may indicate what date he wishes to designate for the reading of the letter.
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL LETTER
TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
An increase in violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Recent criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society has been shocked by the rash of murders of policemen in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the individual will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of use there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing the hanging where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- the ignoring of evidence concerning the ineffectiveness of the death penalty as a deterrent, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be reintroduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual before God.
Mere incarceration without rehabilitation will not change the murderer. Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our law reform officers we put them under almost overwhelming pressure to take the law into their own hands.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider Church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in his love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God. He is a God of love who cares infinitely for every individual.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA, NOVEMBER 1984
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

The Church and Penal Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article549
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Issue
125
Page
1-8 p.
Notes
"Some Church people, and others, are not aware of the interest which the Church has taken in the general agitation for penal reform in Canada.. Since the inception of the Department of Christian Social Service of our General Synod, in 1917, we have steadily pressed for constructive reforms in the administration of justice, of punishment and rehabilitation, on Federal, Provincial and Municipal levels. .... In February, 1937, this Council presented a Brief to the Royal Commission then investigating the whole matter. .... The Brief is still up to date as few of the Recommendation of the Royal Commission have been implemented. What is needed, therefore, is public agitation to urge and to enable Government to proceed with reform. .... First, some co-ordination of the Federal and the various Provincial systems and institutions, looking to the establishment of Borstal Institutions and a Borstal `system'. The latter is necessary if the institutions are to function properly. We must be clear about this. The name `Borstal' ought to signify to the public not only a certain type of institution (in itself far different and far removed from the present Federal Penitentiaries and/or Provincial Reformatories) but also a whole new system -- one which would deal with offenders, or delinquents, from the moment they come into conflict with law until they are `rehabilitated'. Most, probably, of such persons should never seen the inside of institutions such as we have today. .... Second, the Canadian people may have to spend something more in order to accomplish the desired end. Our people will have to be willing to pay the initial price. In the end, however, we shall save -- in actual hard cash; much more in salvaged human beings and in the prevention of crime and the avoidance of degradation. Are we willing to meet these requirements ? The two documents below, the Council's brief to the Royal Commission, and a statement prepared by a committee of Toronto Diocese and presented to their Synod last year (1945), are published here in order to give our people, as citizens, and in their various Church Synods and subsidiary bodies, a lead. The Toronto Diocesan document is typical (though a bit fuller) of similar statements issued from time to time by other Synods or Church groups." -- [Foreword].
Contents: [Foreword] / W.W. Judd -- Penal Reform : Report to the Toronto Diocesan Synod by a special Committee of the Diocesan Council for Social Service, 1945 -- Brief presented to The Royal Commission on Penal Reform, February, 1937 from The Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada / Most Rev. Derwyn T. Owen, Primate, Chairman [and] Rev. W.W. Judd, General Secretary -- Part 2, Additional Notes : General Church Action -- Pertinent Books In The Council's Library.
The document entitled "Penal Reform" was signed by the three members of the special committee i.e. E.J. Tucker, F.J. Nicholson and John Frank. "Editorial Note: This Report was only received by Toronto synod, not adopted, and commended for study and consideration by Church people and the public generally. It was not regarded a an official statement of the Synod".
Brief divided into five sections: Introductory -- Psychiatry and Custodial Observation -- Segregation and Probation -- Personnel -- Re-habilitation.
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisoners - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Royal Commission to Investigate the Penal System of Canada
Prison reform - Canada
Borstal system
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Church Council on Justice and Corrections

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official720
Date
May 1988
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
May 1988
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Dr. L.L. Whytehead
Seconder
Rev. M.C. Ingham
Prologue
In view of the fact that Anglican representatives on the Church Council on Justice and Corrections, had tried to resolve problems with the Council, without success, it was felt that disengagement would be the best step.
Text
That the National Executive Council support the principle of disengagement of the Anglican Church of Canada from the Church Council on Justice and Corrections. CARRIED #06-05-88
Subjects
Church Council on Justice and Corrections (Canada)
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Continuing Education of Bishops

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1370
Date
1985 September
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 6-9-85
Date
1985 September
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 6-9-85
Mover
Bishop Lackey
Seconder
Bishop Allan
Text
That at the Fall, 1986 meeting of the House of Bishops, a major portion of the Continuing Education time be devoted to the death penalty and criminal justice, and that time be allotted to a study of retreats and meditations. CARRIED #6-9-85
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Education (Continuing education)
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Retreats - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Correspondence - Justice and Corrections

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1590
Date
1991 November 4-10
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1991 November 4-10
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop Bays
Seconder
Bishop Hannen
Prologue
That action be taken on the correspondence as follows:
Text
That this invitation be referred to the Agenda Committee with the recommendation that a continuing education event be planned for the Fall, 1994 meeting of the House, and that this meeting should take place in Prince Albert, Sask. CARRIED
Subjects
Justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Education (Continuing education)
Less detail

35 records – page 1 of 4.