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Care for the dying : with reference to Hospice King, a Canadian prototype of volunteer homecare

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog21
Author
Hall, Beverly A.
Publication Date
c1988
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
R 726.8 H34 1988
Author
Hall, Beverly A.
Place
Toronto ON
Publisher
Anglican Book Centre
Publication Date
c1988
Physical_Description
80 p. ; 21 x 13 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Beverly Hall".
Includes bibliographical references and bibliography: p. [79]-80.
"Ours is a death-denying society. Fifty years ago sex was the taboo subject; now its death. Society pretends that death is not there and hides it away in dimly lit, solitary rooms in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. The dying person is often an embarrassment to medical staff who are oriented to cure, and unendurable to family members who want to avoid unpleasantness. .... Terminal care, when all active treatment of a patient's disease becomes ineffective and irrelevant to his needs, becomes palliative care. Palliative care is not a medical speciality. It is a concept and philosophy of care. Palliative care tries to alleviate distress in any of its forms, keeps patients as free from pain as possible without drugging them into insensibility, and provides medical, psychological, social, and spiritual support for the family as well as the patient." -- Intro.
"This book has evolved from [Beverly Hall's] working experience with terminally ill people through St. Mary's Anglican Church, Richmond Hill, and Hospice King (the prototype of community homecare in Canada)." -- back cover.
Contents: Introduction -- Learning from the Dying -- Physical-Medical Needs -- Psychological-Social Needs -- Spiritual Needs -- Understanding the Needs of AIDS Patients -- Care of the Caregiver -- The Hospice Concept -- Epilogue -- Endnotes -- Bibliography.
Author is an Anglican priest.
Subjects
Terminal care - Canada
Terminally ill - Pastoral counseling of
Terminally ill - Psychology
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospice King (King City, Ont.)
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Canada
Church work with AIDS patients - Anglican Church of Canada
Caregivers
ISBN
0-919891-87-X
Call Number
R 726.8 H34 1988
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Chaplains take pragmatic approach to Supreme Court ruling

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39525
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 April
Author
Forget, André
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 April
Volume
141
Issue
4
Page
8
Notes
The Journal spoke with three chaplains and ministers who work closely with the dying and their families about the recent Supreme Court decision to strike down the ban on physician-assisted suicide. The Very Rev. Iain Luke, in the diocese of Athabasca, "expressed a theological concern that the statement suggests that 'dying and suffering around death, have no value', [but] he was also cautiously optimistic that the court's decision might actually provide a boost to palliative care". "For Luke, the church's most important role in response to assisted dying is to continue showing care and support for the dying and their families". The Rev. Keirstan Wells, co-ordinating diocesan health care chaplain for the diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, "said she thinks the court ruling is a 'positive development' because if will give people that autonomy, should they desire it. But she also believes that the church must provide guidance for those who are thinking through such end-of-life decisions". The Rev. Joanne Davies, a chaplain with the diocese of Toronto, "does think that the ruling has a positive side, in addition to the challenges. 'It means that we're actually going to talk about death and dying and actually name it', she said. 'As I begin to look at, that's the best part .. that people will actually start to think about it, and that passage to death is one form of care'".
Subjects
Canada. Supreme Court
Euthanasia - Law and legislation - Canada
Assisted suicide - Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palliative treatment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Hospital - Anglican Church of Canada
Luke, Iain
Wells, Keirstan
Davies, Joanne
Less detail

Dying yet we live : our spiritual care of the dying

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog109
Author
Chidwick, Paul
Publication Date
1988
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
R 726.8 C48 1988
Author
Chidwick, Paul
Place
Toronto ON
Publisher
Anglican Book Centre
Publication Date
1988
Physical_Description
109 p ; 20.9 x 13.4 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Paul Chidwick".
Includes bibliography, p. 107-109.
"The book was conceived out of a sense of frustration. During my twenty-eight years as a parish priest and teacher in pastoral theology, and the last ten years working with the terminally ill through the parish of St. Mary's and the Hospice of Windsor. I discovered that there was a great deal of misunderstanding about what spirituality involved and who might be called upon to offer spiritual care. The parameters of spiritual care were often limited to things ecclesiastical and circumscribed within the role description of a particular professional group. The main thesis of this book is that our concept of spirituality needs to be broadened, and that this will greatly affect the identity of the caregivers." -- Preface.
Contents: Preface -- Introduction -- What is Spirituality ? -- Spiritual Issues -- The Responsibility to Care -- Phenomenal Experiences: Spiritual, Psychological or Both ? -- Practising Pastoral Care -- Spirituality and the Future of Palliative Care -- Select Bibliography.
Author is a priest in the Anglican Church of Canada. "He is the founder of Hospice of Windsor and has served on many national and provincial palliative-care committees. While acting as chairman of the Primate's Task Force on Human Life he was co-editor of the book 'Dying, Considerations Concerning Passage from Life to Death'." -- back cover.
Subjects
Terminally ill - Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Christianity
Death - Psychological aspects
Death - Religious aspects - Christianity
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Caregivers - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
ISBN
0-919891-91-8
Call Number
R 726.8 C48 1988
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

Faith and healing : Helping the dying find peace

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36792
Author
Gaitskell, Victoria
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 April
Author
Gaitskell, Victoria
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 April
Volume
138
Issue
4
Page
6
Notes
Brenda Garvey is an honorary lay pastoral assistant at St. Cuthbert's, Oakville, Ontario. She is also multifaith chaplain at Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga, and a licensed lay anointer. "In 2006, Trillium hired Garvey to assist patients with cancer and other terminal illnesses and their families. 'Death is as much a sacred miracle as birth', says Garvey, who notes that when she anoints Anglicans with the same oil with which they've been baptized, 'they feel they have come full circle and been touched by God again'. As Garvey sees it, her job is to help people of different faith, or of no faith, have 'a good death experience'. By offering comfort and meaning, Garvey helps them 'to be present in each precious last moment'."
Author "is a journalist and parishioner at St. Cuthbert's, Oakville, Ont."
Subjects
Spiritual healing - Anglican Church of Canada
Healing - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Imposition of hands - Anglican Church of Canada
Unction - Anglican Church of Canada
Garvey, Brenda
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the dying - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglicans approve report opposing euthanasia, assisted suicide

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7129
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 28, 1998 -- The Anglican Church of Canada's chief governing body has endorsed a report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The 300 members of the Anglican General Synod meeting here this week, commended the report which states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community". The report will now go to Anglican churches across the country for study and response.
Bishop Victoria Matthews of Edmonton who proposed the motion, said the report was created to engage Christians in ethical and theological reflection relating to euthanasia and assisted suicide. Our purpose is not to try and tell the government how to act, but to help Anglicans become aware of the concerns surrounding these practices".
Bishop Matthews said Christians view life as a gift that is not ours to discard", and noted that every life must be considered in relation to those in the wider society.
The report states that the Christian response is always one of hope. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
The resolution approved by General Synod asks that the report and supporting documents be circulated throughout the Canadian Anglican community and that responses be considered by next year by the Council of General Synod. The council meets in years when General Synod does not.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Euthanasia and assisted suicide a "failure of human community" Anglican report says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7125
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
(MONTREAL ) May 24, 1998 -- Anglicans across the country will be asked to respond to a new report which says the church cannot support euthanasia or assisted suicide.
The report, which will be presented to the 300 members gathered for the Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod meeting here this week, states that such practices represent a "serious failure of human community".
"The Christian response is always one of hope," the report says. "From this hope there arises the commitment to give all members of society, especially the most vulnerable, the assurance that they will be supported in all circumstances of their lives, that they will not have dehumanizing medical interventions forced upon them, and that they will not be abandoned in their suffering."
Although the report acknowledges that individuals on both sides of this issue hold genuine concern for the protection of human dignity, it states that euthanasia is likely to have different impact on different parts of society. "We are concerned about the impact that making euthanasia available would have on the elderly and the disabled. We are also concerned that women may be more severely impacted than men."
The report goes on "We would further urge that the attempt to change the law and practice at a time when health services are being cut back and costs downloaded onto patients and their families is inappropriate."
The report notes the Anglican church's long history of providing many forms of care and support for the dying, including palliative care and hospices which attempt to alleviate pain and maintain the dignity of life.
"Good medical practice sustains the commitment to care even when it is no longer possible to cure," the report says. "Such care may involve the removal of therapies that are ineffective and/or intolerably burdensome, in favor of palliative measures. We do not support the idea that care can include an act or omission whose primary intention is to end a person's life."
The report adds: "Our underlying commitment is that health care delivery as a whole should reflect the desire of Canadians to be a community that sustains the dignity and worth of all its members".
General Synod delegates are to debate the report in the next few days.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Hospices (Terminal care) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Public health - Canada
Less detail

How should we die ? : decision making at the end of life

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog8565
Publication Date
1999
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
R 726 H8 H6 1999
Corporate Author
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Huron. Doctrine and Worship Committee
Place
London ON
Publisher
The Doctrine and Worship Committee for the Diocese of Huron
Publication Date
1999
Physical_Description
76 p. ; 28 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Second Edition, February 1999". First edition published January 1998. -- verso of t.-p.
"Editors: John H. Chapman, Mark Gladding, Marion Jenkins, Dalice Sim." -- p. 3.
"Contributors: Cate McBurney, John Grant Morden, Dalice Sim, Alistair Weir". -- p. 3.
Includes bibliographical references.
"At our May 1996 Diocesan Synod, a motion was passed requesting the Doctrine and Worship Committee to prepare study materials to guide parish discussions on the issue of assisted suicide. The members of the committee have developed these materials as a response to this request as well as materials related to other issues that often arise at the end of life". -- p. 6.
Contents: Preface dated 19 January 1998 / John H. Chapman, Chair of the Doctrine and Worship Committee, Diocese of Huron -- A Message from the Archbishop / Percy [O'Driscoll] -- Notes for Facilitators -- How Should We Die ?: An Introduction to the Issues -- Session 1: What Decisions Can We Make ? : The Importance of Advanced Directives -- Session 2: How Do We Make Decisions for Others ? : Surrogate Decision Making -- Session 3: How Long Must We Continue ? : Making Decisions for and about Children -- Session 4: When Decisions Have to Be Made Now : The Emergency Situation -- Session 5: When Someone Asks for Help to Die : Assisted Suicide -- Additional Reading -- References -- Liturgical Resources.
Additional Reading section contains: Excerpts from the Special Senate Committee on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide -- Euthanasia, Suicide and Assisted-Suicide in Church Tradition and in View of the Church's Traditional Teachings about Life-after-Death / John Grant Morden -- The New Testament Scriptures and Euthanasia / Alistair Weir -- What the World is Saying about Euthanasia : Excerpts from a paper presented to the Diocese of Huron, Doctrine and Worship Committee 1996 / Cate McBurney -- Conversation about Ethics with Tom Mabey.
Added Entry
Chapman, John H. (John Holland), 1954-
Gladding, Mark
Jenkins, Marion
Sim, Dalice A. (Dalice Audrey)
Mabey, Tom
McBurney, Cate
Morden, John Grant, 1925-2009
Weir, Alistair
Subjects
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Life support systems (Critical care) - Moral and ethical aspects
Christian ethics - Anglican Church of Canada
Decision-making - Moral and ethical aspects
Decision-making - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Call Number
R 726 H8 H6 1999
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

How should we die ? : decision making at the end of life

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog4703
Publication Date
1999
Material Type
Book
Location
General Synod Archives
Call Number
R 726 H8 H6 1999
Corporate Author
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Huron. Doctrine and Worship Committee
Place
London ON
Publisher
The Doctrine and Worship Committee for the Diocese of Huron
Publication Date
1999
Physical_Description
76 p. ; 28 x 21 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Second Edition, February 1999". First edition published January 1998. -- verso of t.-p.
"Editors: John H. Chapman, Mark Gladding, Marion Jenkins, Dalice Sim." -- p. 3.
"Contributors: Cate McBurney, John Grant Morden, Dalice Sim, Alistair Weir". -- p. 3.
Includes bibliographical references.
"At our May 1996 Diocesan Synod, a motion was passed requesting the Doctrine and Worship Committee to prepare study materials to guide parish discussions on the issue of assisted suicide. The members of the committee have developed these materials as a response to this request as well as materials related to other issues that often arise at the end of life". -- p. 6.
Contents: Preface dated 19 January 1998 / John H. Chapman, Chair of the Doctrine and Worship Committee, Diocese of Huron -- A Message from the Archbishop / Percy [O'Driscoll] -- Notes for Facilitators -- How Should We Die ?: An Introduction to the Issues -- Session 1: What Decisions Can We Make ? : The Importance of Advanced Directives -- Session 2: How Do We Make Decisions for Others ? : Surrogate Decision Making -- Session 3: How Long Must We Continue ? : Making Decisions for and about Children -- Session 4: When Decisions Have to Be Made Now : The Emergency Situation -- Session 5: When Someone Asks for Help to Die : Assisted Suicide -- Additional Reading -- References -- Liturgical Resources.
Additional Reading section contains: Excerpts from the Special Senate Committee on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide -- Euthanasia, Suicide and Assisted-Suicide in Church Tradition and in View of the Church's Traditional Teachings about Life-after-Death / John Grant Morden -- The New Testament Scriptures and Euthanasia / Alistair Weir -- What the World is Saying about Euthanasia : Excerpts from a paper presented to the Diocese of Huron, Doctrine and Worship Committee 1996 / Cate McBurney -- Conversation about Ethics with Tom Mabey.
Added Entry
Chapman, John H. (John Holland), 1954-
Gladding, Mark
Jenkins, Marion
Sim, Dalice A. (Dalice Audrey)
Mabey, Tom
McBurney, Cate
Morden, John Grant, 1925-2009
Weir, Alistair
Subjects
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Assisted suicide - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Life support systems (Critical care) - Moral and ethical aspects
Christian ethics - Anglican Church of Canada
Decision making - Moral and ethical aspects
Decision making - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Call Number
R 726 H8 H6 1999
Location
General Synod Archives
Less detail

How to hear dying people

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article29889
Author
Holst, Wayne A. (Wayne Alfred)
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Winter
Author
Holst, Wayne A. (Wayne Alfred)
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Winter
Volume
10
Issue
1
Page
26
Notes
The author talks with Dr. David Kuhl, a Canadian Anglican physician who has written a book "What Dying People Want". "Effective physicians learn to focus their attention on the dying patient as a person, not a case." In addition to his writing, Kuhl "as helped to develop the palliative care program for people with cancer and AIDS at St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver. Teams he has trained have attended to thousands of people at the end of life". "Giving voice to humanity's voiceless is a time-honoured Christian value. From his experience and his studies this physician has learned an important lesson. Many dying people have for too long gone unheard. David Kuhl is doing all he can to break down the silence and the faulty communication."
Subjects
Kuhl, David
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the dying - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the terminally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.