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B.C. grief recovery program helps families of AIDS victims

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41464
Author
Purden, Carolyn, 1941-
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 December
Author
Purden, Carolyn, 1941-
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 December
Volume
116
Issue
10
Page
18
Notes
"People who have lost a family member, a friend or a partner to AIDS are finding support in an Anglican grief recovery program. The program operates out of Vancouver's Christ Church Cathedral under the auspices of the Anglican diocese of New Westminster and the downtown Anglican churches."
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the bereaved - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

B.C. grief recovery program helps families of AIDS victims

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article4548
Author
Purden, Carolyn, 1941-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 December
Author
Purden, Carolyn, 1941-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1990 December
Volume
116
Issue
10
Page
18
Notes
"People who have lost a family member, a friend or a partner to AIDS are finding support in an Anglican grief recovery program. The program operates out of Vancouver's Christ Church Cathedral under the auspices of the Anglican diocese of New Westminster and the downtown Anglican churches."
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the bereaved - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

The dreaded knock : What can possible be worth a soldier's life ? : Reflection

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36337
Author
Lambert, Lee
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 September
Author
Lambert, Lee
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2010 September
Volume
135
Issue
7
Page
5
Notes
The author, an Anglican military chaplain, describes his feelings as he goes out to inform a family that their loved one, a young soldier with a wife and child, has been killed in Afghanistan. "We get sidetracked en route, giving this woman an extra two minutes of not knowing that her husband is dead. She might be lying awake thinking of him at this very moment, wondering how he is and what he is doing, thinking of a brighter future: birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, grandchildren that they will enjoy together. All those things are about to be taken away. By me."
Author "has been a Canadian Forces chaplain for seven years ... and is the rector of St. Mary's Anglican Church in Russell, Ont."
Subjects
Military chaplains - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Armed Forces - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Afghan War, 2001 - Participation, Canadian
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Grief - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the bereaved - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Dying - Considerations Concerning the Passage from Life to Death

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1174
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 70
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 70
Mover
Mr. P.J. Andrewes
Seconder
The Rev. P.C. Jefferson
Text
That
a) the report be sent back to the Task Force or a successor group for re-writing in the light of the total discussion on the floor of Synod, with a clear emphasis on the Christian concern for the sanctity of human life; such re-written report to be published for distribution and study on the authority of the National Executive Council.
b) the Task Force be encouraged to receive submissions from all interested bodies and individuals such as other churches, The Canadian Association for the Mentally Retarded, the Address of Mr. Justice Lamer of the Canadian Law Reform Commission, etc.; and
c) in the meantime Recommendations 2 and 3 on pages 18 and 19 of the interim Report be accepted as a basis for ecumenical action from the present time.
After extensive discussion and debate the Motion was put and CARRIED ACT 70
Notes
The Recommendations referred to in paragraph (c) of the Resolution are:
2) Education
A) That the Church recognize its responsibility to provide educational programmes to effect a better understanding of the needs of the dying patient, of those responsible for the patient's welfare and of the next of kin. We believe that these programmes should focus on a number of specific areas.
a) The delineation, in the continuing education of clergy, of their special role with the dying patient and with their immediate families.
b) The inclusion of similar training and experience within the academic and pastoral programmes of theological colleges.
c) To equip church people for effective ministry to the terminally ill in conjunction with the medical team and for service in volunteer Home Care programmes of hospitals.
d) The establishment of Grief Recovery groups to enable the bereaved to identify and reconcile their feeling of guilt and grief.
e) The development in the Church and in society at large of a more realistic and wholesome attitude to and acceptance of the dying process and of death itself.
B) a) That the Church urge local professional associations to initiate programmes of continuing education for doctors and nurses to develop more skillful and compassionate care of the dying and bereaved.
b) That the Church emphasize the importance of similar training in the curricula of all health care teaching institutions.
3. Patient Care
A) That the Church actively support and encourage all persons and institutions which provide effective care for the terminally ill especially the Palliative Care Units at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal and at St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, working toward the establishment of similar units in other hospitals.
B) That the Church make continuing representations to provincial governments for the provision on a growing scale of small, independent units for the care of terminal patients in which conditions allow the development of close relations between patients, their families and those who care for them.
C) That the Church urge hospitals to expand Home Care programmes in the community with the support of visiting nurses, physician home visits and ancillary services so that dying patients may have the option of remaining at home in the care of their families (see Malkin, S.: "Care of the terminally ill at home", "Canadian Medical Association Journal" 115 (July 17, 1976), p.129
D) That the Church cooperate at the local level with appropriate Medical Boards, District Health Councils, professional societies, provincial associations and other agencies to initiate feasibility studies for improving further the care of dying patients and that findings be forwarded to provincial and the federal governments.
Subjects
Euthanasia - Canada
Euthanasia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Death - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Terminal care - Canada
Terminal care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palliative care - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the bereaved - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail