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Bringing message of hope in prison cells

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article35002
Author
Towstego, Lon
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 December
Author
Towstego, Lon
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2007 December
Volume
133
Issue
10
Page
9
Notes
Author is chaplain at Nanaimo Correctional Centre.
Part of Living the Christmas Story.
Subjects
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Christmas - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1335
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 13-2-87
Resolution 14-2-87
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Brown
Seconder
Bishop Conlin
Prologue
Moved by: Bishop Brown
Seconded by: Bishop Lawrence
That the Pastoral be considered and edited as necessary. CARRIED
It was agreed that the Reverend Don Brown should be requested to prepare a list of all Members of Parliament and distribute copies of the list to all the Bishops.
Text
That we accept this Pastoral on Capital Punishment. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL : TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
Violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society is shocked by the murder of police in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the person will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of us there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing execution where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- despite the common assumption that the death penalty functions as a deterrent, Canadian experience has shown that there has been no increase in the murder rate following the abolition of capital punishment, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be re-introduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual person before God.
Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our police and staff of correctional institutions we put them under almost overwhelming stress and this in turn may contribute to citizens feeling the need to take the law into their own hands. This could only lead to an increase in the spiral of violence.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God, a God of love who cares infinitely for every person.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
FEBRUARY, 1987.
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

Capital Punishment

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1396
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Date
1984 October - November
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-10-84
Pastoral Letter
Mover
Bishop Lackey
Seconder
Bishop Hannen
Text
That this Pastoral Letter be issued to the members of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Citizens of Canada. CARRIED. ONE OPPOSITION #7-10-84
Notes
It was agreed that copies of the Pastoral Letter on Capital Punishment should be sent to the leaders of the three Federal political parties. The Primate said that a mailing would go to all the clergy following the meeting of the National Executive Council, but that the Bishops are free to use the letter immediately and to release it to local papers.
It was agreed that clergy should be encouraged to read the letter in the Churches on a Sunday that is appropriate. The Diocesan Bishop may indicate what date he wishes to designate for the reading of the letter.
APPENDIX A
PASTORAL LETTER
TO THE PEOPLE OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA AND THE CITIZENS OF CANADA
The violence that marks our society is a cause of great concern, for violence often begets violence. There is a streak in human nature which out of greed, or in order to attain revenge, or to cover inadequacies, hits out violently. Inequities in society at large also lead to actions arising from frustration and anger. Such violence strikes at the very heart of society. People cannot live together unless this tendency is controlled.
Society has developed mechanisms to keep violence under control. Law and order are necessary if citizens are to live in safety and be free to come and go. Our police forces and justice system are designed to curb destructive forces and to make Canada a safe place to live.
An increase in violence has brought great strains to our police and judicial system. Recent criminal acts have led to police being more heavily armed. Society has been shocked by the rash of murders of policemen in the course of duty. Prisons are over crowded and prison guards have a thankless and dangerous job.
It does not surprise us that there has been a renewed call for the re-institution of the death penalty for murder. We understand the feelings that have led to this and have sympathy with those who have been deeply hurt by criminal activity. However, we cannot be content with an answer that responds to violence with even more violence. An answer which destroys human life cannot enhance the respect for, and quality of, life in our society. On the contrary, an important Christian conviction is that anything that increases a general recognition within society of the infinite worth of the individual will be a powerful agent in the ultimate protection of that society.
We believe in the sacredness of human life. Life is God's gift and the Bible teaches us that men and women are made in the image of God. The distortion of that image that is reflected in a person committing a murder does not make that person any less important in God's eyes. In all of use there is some distortion of the image, but the Lord died for all of us.
We urge our people and members of Parliament that they consider seriously the implications of re-introducing the death penalty and not give in to a hasty response to recent violence. These implications include such things as:
- the impossibility of reversing the hanging where there has been a miscarriage of justice;
- the ignoring of evidence concerning the ineffectiveness of the death penalty as a deterrent, and
- a belief that the murderer is beyond being changed by God's grace to be a creative member of society.
We are convinced that it is in the best interests of Canadian society as a whole that Capital Punishment not be reintroduced, but that as Christians we need to seek alternatives that recognize the infinite worth of the individual before God.
Mere incarceration without rehabilitation will not change the murderer. Reform of our correctional systems needs to become a priority of our Government. The parole system needs continuing review so that no one who continues to be a danger is released into society. Experiments which are taking place for renewal of penal institutions and programmes should be encouraged and extended.
We must give support to police forces and prison guards by providing sufficient personnel and adequate training. If society does not give the necessary support to our law reform officers we put them under almost overwhelming pressure to take the law into their own hands.
We encourage members of our parishes to be supportive to the victims of crime and their families. Feelings of fear and anger can become destructive and will only be healed by others reaching out lovingly. The Christian community also needs to be a support to families of guards who often have to cope with the pressures involved in this work.
Prison chaplains have a difficult role and need the support and prayers of the wider Church. The chaplain has the task of sharing by word, and by friendship, the news of a God who in his love both forgives us and calls us to live the new life.
For all of us that new standard includes a personal struggle against violence. Societal controls on violence are not enough. Each one of us is called to reflect the image of God. He is a God of love who cares infinitely for every individual.
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA, NOVEMBER 1984
Subjects
Capital punishment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Violence - Canada
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Victims of crimes - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail

Chaplains - Contract - In the Federal Corrections Service

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1336
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 15-2-87
Date
1987 February 16-20
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 15-2-87
Mover
Archbishop Hambidge
Seconder
Bishop Clarke
Prologue
The draft Guidelines which were presented by the Reverend Richard Johns were discussed.
Text
That the Guidelines be accepted with the proviso that Section II C(i) include, as well as the license, that the individual be accepted into the diocese. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX B
GUIDELINES - CONTRACT CHAPLAINS SERVING IN CORRECTIONAL SERVICE CANADA
I. Canon XVII - Section 4a
Bishops, Priests and Deacons who are engaged in specialized ministries outside the Diocese where they are registered, shall be considered to be on leave of absence from that Diocese, and subject to the general supervision of the Bishop of the Diocese in which the specialized ministry is exercised.
II. Appointment Procedures
A. Upon receiving an application for appointment from Anglican clergy, the Correctional Service will seek endorsation from the Diocesan Bishop of the applicant. This endorsation is a necessary prerequisite for all candidates.
B. The Office of Personnel Resources will also be notified of any Anglican applications, for information.
C. If, after screening for a specific position, an applicant is placed on a short list for further consideration, the Correctional Service will notify the Office of Personnel Resources, requesting that the Office confirm that, if the applicant is chosen, the Bishop of the Diocese where the position is located would either (i) receive Letters Benedecessit [sic i.e. Bene Decessot] for the individual and license him/her or (ii) accept general supervision as per Canon XVII, Section 4a.
D. The Office of Personnel Resources will seek confirmation from the appropriate Bishop as a prerequisite for further consideration of the applicant by Correctional Service Canada.
III. Transfer Procedures
In the event that a contract chaplain is considered for transfer to an institution located in another Diocese, the procedures in II C and D above will be followed as a prerequisite for such a transfer.
IV. Diocesan Registration
A. At time of appointment as a chaplain in Correctional Service Canada, a decision shall be made by the Diocesan Bishop of the Diocese where the chaplain is registered as to whether the priest's registration is: (i) to be maintained in the Diocese; (ii) to be transferred to the Diocese where the priest is to serve as chaplain; (iii) transferred to the Primatial List of Clergy on the basis of the following criteria:
1. The feasibility of a continuing pastoral relationship between Bishop and priest.
2. The reasonable probability of the priest's return to service in the Diocese within a period of five to ten years.
3. The desire of the Bishop of the Diocese where the priest is to serve as chaplain to receive the priest into that Diocese.
B. If the decision is reached that the priest's registration should continue in the Diocese, the Bishop of the Diocese shall enter into a contractual agreement with Correctional Service Canada regarding the priest's service as a correctional chaplain, and shall continue as the contracting party so long as the priest remains a chaplain in the Correctional Service Canada.
C. If the decision is reached that the priest is to be transferred to the Diocese where he/she is to service as a chaplain, the Bishop of the receiving Diocese shall enter into a contractual relationship with Correctional Service Canada regarding the priest's service as a correctional chaplain and shall continue as the contracting party so long as the priest continues to serve as a chaplain within the Diocese. In the event that the priest is transferred to another Diocese by Correctional Service Canada, the options in III above are once again considered.
D. If the decision is reached that the priest's registration should be transferred to the Primatial List of Clergy, the Primate or his designate shall enter into contractual agreement with Correctional Service Canada regarding the priest's service as a correctional chaplain, and shall continue as the contracting party so long as the priest remains a chaplain in Correctional Service Canada.
E. It shall be the responsibility of each chaplain in Correctional Service Canada to be in personal contact or correspondence at least twice each year with his/her Diocesan Bishop or the Primate, describing the major dimensions of his/her ministry, and any areas where the Bishop's support may be appropriate.
F. In cases where a Diocesan Bishop is the contracting party with Correctional Service Canada, a copy of the contract will be forwarded to the Personnel Resources Officer for information.
G. In every case, a chaplain in Correctional Service Canada shall be subject to the general supervision of the Bishop of the Diocese in which his/her ministry is exercised, pursuant to Canon XVII, Section 4a.
H. The Personnel Resources Officer will provide a continuing relationship of support and contact for all chaplains in the Correctional Service Canada on behalf of their Diocesan Bishop or the Primate, and will monitor all contracts on their behalf.
I. The Personnel Resources Officer will be available to provide assistance to priests seeking a church appointment at the conclusion of the contractual term of chaplaincy service.
V. Annual Appraisal
A. Wherever possible, the appropriate Bishop or his/her designate will participate in a chaplain's annual performance appraisal.
B. If such participation is not possible, the Personnel Resources Officer will be asked to either participate in the appraisal process, or arrange for an appropriate representative of the Church to participate.
The above guidelines were approved by the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada on February 19, 1987.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Constitution. Canon XVII
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Correctional institutions - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Clergy - Licensing
Less detail

The Church and Penal Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article549
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Author
Church of England in Canada. Council for Social Service
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1946 March 20
Issue
125
Page
1-8 p.
Notes
"Some Church people, and others, are not aware of the interest which the Church has taken in the general agitation for penal reform in Canada.. Since the inception of the Department of Christian Social Service of our General Synod, in 1917, we have steadily pressed for constructive reforms in the administration of justice, of punishment and rehabilitation, on Federal, Provincial and Municipal levels. .... In February, 1937, this Council presented a Brief to the Royal Commission then investigating the whole matter. .... The Brief is still up to date as few of the Recommendation of the Royal Commission have been implemented. What is needed, therefore, is public agitation to urge and to enable Government to proceed with reform. .... First, some co-ordination of the Federal and the various Provincial systems and institutions, looking to the establishment of Borstal Institutions and a Borstal `system'. The latter is necessary if the institutions are to function properly. We must be clear about this. The name `Borstal' ought to signify to the public not only a certain type of institution (in itself far different and far removed from the present Federal Penitentiaries and/or Provincial Reformatories) but also a whole new system -- one which would deal with offenders, or delinquents, from the moment they come into conflict with law until they are `rehabilitated'. Most, probably, of such persons should never seen the inside of institutions such as we have today. .... Second, the Canadian people may have to spend something more in order to accomplish the desired end. Our people will have to be willing to pay the initial price. In the end, however, we shall save -- in actual hard cash; much more in salvaged human beings and in the prevention of crime and the avoidance of degradation. Are we willing to meet these requirements ? The two documents below, the Council's brief to the Royal Commission, and a statement prepared by a committee of Toronto Diocese and presented to their Synod last year (1945), are published here in order to give our people, as citizens, and in their various Church Synods and subsidiary bodies, a lead. The Toronto Diocesan document is typical (though a bit fuller) of similar statements issued from time to time by other Synods or Church groups." -- [Foreword].
Contents: [Foreword] / W.W. Judd -- Penal Reform : Report to the Toronto Diocesan Synod by a special Committee of the Diocesan Council for Social Service, 1945 -- Brief presented to The Royal Commission on Penal Reform, February, 1937 from The Council for Social Service of the Church of England in Canada / Most Rev. Derwyn T. Owen, Primate, Chairman [and] Rev. W.W. Judd, General Secretary -- Part 2, Additional Notes : General Church Action -- Pertinent Books In The Council's Library.
The document entitled "Penal Reform" was signed by the three members of the special committee i.e. E.J. Tucker, F.J. Nicholson and John Frank. "Editorial Note: This Report was only received by Toronto synod, not adopted, and commended for study and consideration by Church people and the public generally. It was not regarded a an official statement of the Synod".
Brief divided into five sections: Introductory -- Psychiatry and Custodial Observation -- Segregation and Probation -- Personnel -- Re-habilitation.
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Prisoners - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada. Royal Commission to Investigate the Penal System of Canada
Prison reform - Canada
Borstal system
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Committee on Ministry

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5239
Date
1971 November 12-13
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1971 November 12-13
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Somerville
Seconder
Smith
Prologue
In presenting the Report of the Committee on Ministry, the Bishop of New Westminster noted, with gratitude, the fine contribution made by the Venerable D.P. Watney as National Consultant on Theological Education. The Primate added, on behalf of the whole Canadian Church, his thanks, and wished Dr. Watney a happy and fulfilling retirement.
Text
That we express strong support of the Inter-Faith Committee on Chaplaincy in the Canadian Penitentiary Service and reappoint as our representatives to that Committee, the Reverend R.D. MacRae and Miss Phyllis Haslam, and ask that they report to the Committee on Ministry. CARRIED
Subjects
Inter-Faith Committee on Chaplaincy
Prisons - Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Committee on Ministry
Watney, Douglas P. (Douglas Percy), 1905-1987
Less detail

"Concerning Chaplains"

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3843
Date
1955 August/September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1955 August/September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rev. L.F. Hatfield
Seconder
Rev. S.H. Prince
Text
Having in mind the progress made, though slowly, during recent years in Governmental policy regarding the appointment of Chaplains to Penal Institutions and Mental Hospitals, and the Council's interest therein, General Synod requests the Council for Social Service to set up a Committee from members of this Synod and the Council, with power to co-opt specially interested persons to study the whole matter of chaplaincy services in such institutions and to impress governments with the necessity for such a programme. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Chaplains, Hospital - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the mentally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Council for Social Service - Penal Reform

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5904
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1934 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Archbishop of Ottawa
Seconder
Magistrate Jones
Prologue
In 1933 various articles appeared in the daily papers asking for an investigation of conditions in the penitentiaries and citing various abuses. The matter was taken up by the late General Secretary, who carried on correspondence with the various chaplains, with the Prisoners' Aid and Welfare Association in Montreal and interviewed personally several discharged prisoners in an endeavour to get some information on the subject. The late Canon Vernon headed a delegation from the Social Service Council of Canada to wait on the Premier and the Minister of Justice with recommendations on penal reform. He obtained permission from the Minister of Justice to visit the various penitentiaries in the autumn of 1933. At the last annual meeting of the Council for Social Service the following resolutions were passed:
1. There ought to be a thorough investigation and study by an independent and representative commission of all our penal and reformatory institutions, whether dominion, provincial or local, and of the entire system of dealing with delinquents and criminals.
2. Careful consideration should be given to the findings of the Royal Commission of 1914, and of the committee of 1921.
3. That the English Adult Probation System, and the so-called Borstal System, should be carefully considered with a view to their adoption in Canada.
4. And that copies of the foregoing recommendations be sent to the Premier of the Dominion, and the Minister of Justice, to the Premier and attorney-generals of the various provinces, to the Social Service Council of Canada, and to the Canadian Prisoners' Welfare Association.
We understand that conditions have improved very much in the last year, and various reforms have been instituted. The restrictions that formerly hampered the chaplains in the discharge of their duties have been lessened, and it is felt that in future a greater effort will be made to help the men to get such training and education, both mental and spiritual, while they are in the penitentiary, that will enable them to re-establish themselves when they are released.
Text
That in the tenth and following lines all the words following "1933" down to and including "Welfare Association" be not printed in the published Report. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Prisons - Canada
Prisons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Criminal justice, Administration of - Canada
Juvenile justice, Administration of - Canada
Juvenile detention homes - Canada
Less detail

FAITH, WORSHIP AND MINISTRY COMMITTEE continued : Prison Chaplaincies/Support of the Primate’s Letter to Minister Vic Toews

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9927
Date
2012 November 15-18
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 17-11-12
Date
2012 November 15-18
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 17-11-12
Mover
Dr. Lela Zimmer
Seconder
The Most Rev. Colin Johnson
Prologue
Ms. Henriette Thompson provided detailed background information regarding the following motion.
Text
That this Council of General Synod express its support of the Primate's letter to Minister Toews, and express its deep concern over the removal of part time chaplaincies from prison services, recognizing that this move will have a disproportionately negative effect on the provision of much needed chaplaincy services to non-Christian inmates.
ADOPTED #17-11-12
Notes
The Primate suggested that the Rev. Laurette Glasgow, Special Advisor for Government Relations, be invited to attend a future COGS meeting. This suggestion was noted.
Subjects
Chaplains, Prison - Canada
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Toews, Vic (Victor), 1952-
Less detail

Institutional Chaplains

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4213
Date
1973 May
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 98
Date
1973 May
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 98
Mover
Chancellor H.R.S. Ryan
Seconder
Bishop H.V.R. Short
Text
THAT General Synod instruct the Committee on Ministry to make provision in the agenda of each session of General Synod for a report on the work of chaplains ministering in penitentiaries and other prisons and correctional institutions and in psychiatric institutions.
CARRIED IN BOTH ORDERS Act 98
Subjects
Chaplains, Prison - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with prisoners - Anglican Church of Canada
Chaplains, Hospital - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with the mentally ill - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.