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Anglican Primate Calls on CBC to Play Major Role in Constitutional Debate

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3185
Date
1980 November 20
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1980 November 20
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Nov. 20, 1980 -- For immediate release
As our country agonizes over the nature of our future, Archbishop E.W. Scott, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has written to Al Johnson, President of the CBC with "a degree of puzzlement concerning the absence of any discernable pattern in CBC programming indicating that the nature of these historic events calls for more from CBC that just news coverage."
The Archbishop questions, "Is it appropriate to cover these events as you might a coronation or state funeral,...requiring no more than passive participation as interested bystanders?"
The Primate declared that "in the face of an apparent choice by the national, elected government to forego extensive citizen involvement," the CBC should accept a "central role as catalyst and medium for a Canadian constitutional dialogue." He likened this role to that of the builders of CPR except that now it is "human barriers of prejudice, ignorance and isolation" which must be bridged.
Archbishop Scott calls for an immediate meeting of the Board of Directors of CBC, or decisive action by Mr. Johnson as Chief Executive Officer, to institute "a policy of informational, cultural and citizen access programming."
The full text of the Archbishop's letter is enclosed.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
Richard J. Berryman
Media Officer
600 Jarvis St., Toronto
Tel. (416) 924-9192 ext. 286
Notes
November 13th, 1980
Mr. Al Johnson
President
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
1500 Bronson Ave.
Box 8478
Ottawa, Ont. K1G 3J5
Dear Mr. Johnson:
We recall with appreciation CBC's balanced and informative coverage of the Quebec referendum campaign. Careful advance planning, combined with a true sense of the significance of the occasion for the country, enabled the Corporation to involved people in the debate while still avoiding the clear risk of Radio Canada becoming a matter of controversy. We recognize that the direction and tone set by the Board of Directors of the CBC, chaired by yourself, was instrumental in providing a most positive example to Canadians of what is so unique about good public broadcasting.
We are writing now to ask members of the CBC Board, through their Chairman, whether an analogous role for CBC has been considered and planned during the present constitutional process? Hearings of the Special Parliamentary Committee are almost upon us and we admit to a degree of puzzlement concerning the absence of any discernable pattern in CBC programming indicating that the nature of these historic events calls for more from CBC than just news coverage.
We ask members of the CBC Board, as trustees of the public interest, to reflect upon how CBC can best serve Canadian needs in a period of active constitutional revision. Can there be any higher priority for CBC than to maximize opportunities for informed citizen participation in the process? Is it appropriate to cover these events as you might a coronation or state funeral, events of great significance to the population but requiring no more than their passive participation as interested bystanders ?
As the most fundamental symbol of Canadian nationhood, patriation of our constitution is an occasion of great moment, the collective, irrevocable assertion of our political independence and freedom. What is currently proposed is indeed even more than patriation, an essentially new constitution in which basic rules of Parliamentary government and rights of citizens are altered, basic approaches to citizens' relations with government are changed, basic understandings of the country are revised.
The right of each citizen to become involved in such a process requires no defence. The opportunity presented to the nation by the fullest participation of our citizens ought to be equally evident. For what value is there to elaborating a new blueprint for interactions among the regions, the language groups, the heritages or beliefs of Canadians, and even between the sexes, when our citizens are not themselves committed to the spirit of accommodation? By leaving citizens as bystanders, we lose the precious opportunity to involve them in a process which begins with exchange, grows into understanding, and should ultimately ripen to tolerance and/or acceptance. It is equally an opportunity to create a constitution which captures, to the best of our abilities, Canadians' collective self-image of the heritage, life and aspirations we share as a country.
We understand that members of CBC's Board -- in the face of an apparent choice by the national, elected government to forego extensive citizen involvement -- cannot lightly set a course for the corporation which might conceivably be perceived as a challenge to federal policy. There is no reason to believe that the same broad support would be forthcoming, as it was from two administrations during the referendum debate, for a CBC policy of greatly expanded public affairs programming and of extensive freetime, citizen access in order to animate participation by Canadians in the constitutional process. At least, on the positive side, the Board does not (yet) have to contend with Cabinet-level accusations of CBC being riddled with Western separatists. We ask members of the Board of CBC to consider most carefully the distinction between the federal interest and the national or public interest, for where the two are not synonymous, it is the latter which forms their ultimate mandate.
Should the Corporation accept what would be obviously a central role, as catalyst and medium for a Canadian constitutional dialogue, it would undertake a task in the electronic 1980's equivalent to the work of the railroad nation-builders a century ago. Only it is the human barriers or prejudice, ignorance, and isolation which the CBC must bridge, as the CPR once spanned the mountains, gorges and swamps of the Canadian terrain. In response to the most disheartening observation of the Task Force on Canadian Unity, that:
"Sometimes the country seemed to us to be composed of a multiplicity of solitudes, islands of self-contained activity and discourse disconnected from their neighbour and tragically unaware of the whole which contained them all. When one speaks, the others did not listen..."
We look to this nation's electronic media as the prime instrument of exchange and contact among our "multiplicity of solitudes", as you did yourself earlier this year before a committee of the CRTC:
"It is by radio and television, more than any other means, that Canadians live together, the events of their country -- that we experience together what we are and what we can do -- in drama and sport, in music and film, in community and individual endeavour. It is by radio and television that we are enriched by our heritages and by different identities -- the triumphs and the troubles of this country".
Unlike the Quebec referendum debate, the present constitutional process has no fixed ending, no compelling occasion for citizen involvement such as a vote, and no clear dichotomy of "oui" and "non"; but there are some datelines if not deadlines for decision. Fair balance in programming will be most difficult to achieve given the diversity of Canadian voices on constitutional issues, compounded by the absence of any one or two clearcut themes in a debate which is too infant to have yet developed a focus. This underlines for us the urgency of planning within CBC for such a complex enterprise. A special, immediate meeting of the Board of Directors of CBC, solely on the matter of CBC's role in the constitutional process, would be in our opinion justified by present circumstances. Canadians may never have been in such need as now of their national broadcasting service. If for some reason this is not possible, we would assume you make the necessary decision as the Chief Executive Officer.
We look to CBC for a policy of informational, cultural and citizen access programming which will inform, sensitize, and challenge Canadians regarding constitutional renewal. We trust we are not mistaken in our understanding of what national public broadcasting is all about for Canada during this critical period.
This letter comes to you following discussion with a number of concerned Canadians in many parts of Canada -- some active in the Church and others not. It also has the general endorsation of the National Executive Council of the Anglican Church of Canada which spent several hours sharing concerns and views about the constitutional situation at its recent meeting held from November 5th to 7th, 1980.
Yours faithfully,
The Most Reverend Edward W. Scott, Primate.
Subjects
Canada. Constitutional history
Canada - Constitution - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Political activity
Political participation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Quebec (Province) - Politics and government - 1976-1985
Quebec (Province) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Referendum - Quebec (Province)
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Television broadcasting - Canada
Television broadcasting - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Mass media - Influence - Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglican bishop defines church's role in politics and "justice" issues

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7127
Date
1998 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 25
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
MONTREAL (May 25) -- Anglican Bishop of Montreal Andrew Hutchison has given members of the church's chief governing body a vision of the church in Quebec that would see it stay out of partisan politics while pursuing goals of reconciliation, justice and peace.
Speaking on the theme of "nation and identity", Bishop Hutchison told 300 members of the Anglican General Synod meeting here this week that the church has no mandate to advocate one form of government over another.
"How we choose to organize ourselves for collective security and well being is a political question that must be settled by voters at the ballot box, be they Christian or not," he said.
But the bishop added: "We do, on the other hand, have a mandate ... to strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.
"It is my view that the church has no business aligning itself with the Yes or the No side of a referendum on such issues. It must, however, be vigilant in safeguarding the fundamental rights and well being of its citizens. It is not acceptable to achieve a political agenda at the cost of the just and core values of a society".
Bishop Hutchison admitted that as a leader of an overwhelmingly anglophone diocese in a francophone province, his refusal to take political sides has at times been uncomfortable both for him and for members of the church who look to him for leadership.
On the other hand, he said he has not hesitated to speak passionately on political issues, both in private and in public, where he feels that questions of justice are involved.
He noted that he has spoken out on the question of native self-determination and on the "scandalous" removal of Passover foods from store shelves because they lacked French language packaging. "These are matters that for me touch our baptismal commitment," he explained. "Political organization, on the other hand, does not in such an obvious way".
Bishop Hutchison's address was an introduction to a session later in the day in which an invited panel was to engage General Synod in a discussion on "nation and identity" . The bishop told the gathering that in the context of his views on church and politics, it "is important to say that we do not intend a debate on the issue of the aspirations of Quebec or any group".
Rather, he added, it was important that General Synod members be exposed to an exchange of information, to the realization that concerns about issues of nation and identity are common among many groups across the country and to the exploration of ways in which these diverse groups can help each other.
On the question of Quebec, however, Bishop Hutchison said it is a myth that Canada consists of "two solitudes". Politicians and others, he said, have been quick to exploit this myth of a nation based on a duality for their own purposes.
"It is a myth that does not take into account societies that have evolved clear across this land over thousands of years prior to European immigration. It takes no notice ... of any countries other than France and Great Britain." The myth as exploited by politicians "has effectively re-enforced a victim mentality among French Quebecois," he said.
Rather than a nation of two solitudes, Bishop Hutchison argued, Canada is, in fact, based on a notion of partnership, an area, he added, where the Anglican church has a great deal to teach the rest of the country.
The Anglican concept of partnership, he said, consists of listening to others, understanding their aspirations and sharing resources required for them to achieve their dreams."
"I believe that the partnership principle that has become so respected internationally and in the affairs of our church in Canada could have a wider application within our land and serve us well in the future," Bishop Hutchison said.
- 30 -
NOTE TO EDITORS: The plenary sessions of General Synod are held in the Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium at 475 Pine Avenue at McGill University. This evening's panel begins at 7:15 p.m.
Members of the panel are former Quebec Liberal leader Claude Ryan, Grand Chief Matthew Coon-Come of the Grand Council of the Cree, the Hon. Brian Smith, former Attorney General of British Columbia and current chairman of BC Hydro and Power Authority, Archdeacon Rod Gillis of Cape Breton; and Joan Fraser, Director General of the Centre for Research and Information on Canada and a former editor of the Montreal Gazette. The moderator will be Senator Ann [i.e. Anne] Cools.
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Nationalism - Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Quebec (Province) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Quebec (Province) - Politics and government - 1994-
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
Multiculturalism - Canada
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Anglican gathering to focus on "nation and identity"

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7124
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 24
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
MONTREAL, May 24 -- National identity will be the focus of a special panel discussion to be held May 25 at 7:15 p.m. at the General Synod meeting of the Anglican Church of Canada.
The panelists, who represent a wide variety of regional and cultural views, include: The Hon. Claude Ryan, former Liberal leader, Assemblee Nationale du Quebec and a former editor of le Devoir; Grand Chief Matthew Coon-Come of the Grand Council of the Cree; the Hon. Brian Smith, former Attorney General of British Columbia and current chairman of BC Hydro and Power Authority; the Ven. Rod Gillis, Anglican archdeacon of Cape Breton; and Joan Fraser, Director General of the Centre for Research and Information on Canada. Moderating the panel will be the Hon. Senator Ann [i.e. Anne] Cools.
Earlier in the day, as part of the same event, Anglican Bishop of Montreal Andrew Hutchison will address General Synod on the theme of "nation and identity". His speech will look at these issues from a theological as well as a political perspective.
Each panelist will make a statement, with particular focus on the needs and concerns of their region or constituency. This will be followed by a discussion among the panelists and questions from members of General Synod. General Synod, the Anglican Church's chief governing body, consists of more than 300 Anglican bishops, clergy and laity from across Canada.
- 30 -
NOTE TO EDITORS: The plenary sessions of General Synod are held in the Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium at 475 Pine Avenue at McGill University. Bishop Hutchison's speech is at 4 p.m.; the evening panel begins at 7:15 p.m.
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Nationalism - Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ryan, Claude, 1925-2004
Coon-Come, Matthew
Smith, Brian
Gillis, Rod
Fraser, Joan
Cools, Anne
Hutchison, Andrew
Less detail

General Synod 1998 : Seek greater political role, church leaders told

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7128
Date
1998 May 26
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1998 May 26
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
MONTREAL (May 26) -- Church leaders ought to play a greater role in speaking out on issues of the day, especially when matters of principle and social justice are concerned, a panel of public figures has told members of the Anglican Church of Canada's General Synod.
The strongest plea for a more pro-active social role by the church and its leaders came from Quebec elder statesman Claude Ryan, a former Liberal leader in the Assemblee Nationale and the spokesman for the No side during Quebec's first referendum on independence in 1980.
"I would like to see religious leaders intervene in debates more clearly and more forcibly where matters of principle are involved", Mr. Ryan told the 300 General Synod members meeting here this week. "I would like to see them participate more in the formation of young people. ... The church must play a more active role in helping us solve our problems."
His comments were echoed by Senator Ann [i.e. Anne] Cools, moderator of the five-person panel, who agreed that the church "must intervene more forcibly in the problems of our country", and by former attorney general of British Columbia Brian Smith, who described churches as "important vehicles of national understanding and reconciliation".
Another panelist, Joan Fraser, Director General of the Centre for Research and Information on Canada and a former editor of the Montreal Gazette, asked: "If you, the church, don't go to the heart of things, then who will ?"
The panel was convened to address General Synod members on the theme of "nation and identity" but comments covered the gamut of social and political issue[s] with the place of Quebec in the Canadian Confederation at the forefront.
The General Synod theme -- "Lift every voice / Faisons entendre nos voix" -- is meant to invite members to reflect on diversity, inclusiveness and minority voices in Canadian society.
Earlier in the day, Anglican Bishop of Montreal Andrew Hutchison, speaking to General Synod on the same theme, drew a sharp distinction between partisan politics, where he said the church had no mandate to intervene, and issues of principle, such as peace, justice and reconciliation, where, he argued, it is bound to speak out.
Another evening panelist, Grand Chief Matthew Coon-Come of the Grand Council of the Cree, said that churches today are to be commended for the role they seek to play in fostering social wrongs, but that in the past, they have been complicit in fostering social conditions that have lead to the plight of aboriginal peoples in Canada today. "I challenge members of all faith communities to be witness to these injustices," he said, referring to the social problems his people struggle against.
Speaking to the evening's theme, Chief Coon-Come said that "national and identity" are more than political concepts. In the case of Canada's aboriginal peoples, he argued, "it is self evident that we are a people and a nation".
Chief Coon-Come said there has, in fact, been little evolution in the way that Canadian society treats aboriginal peoples from the days of imposed or fraudulent treaties to today. A new policy to deal with aboriginal peoples formulated by the Quebec government is a perpetuation of the same "fraud and hoax", he said.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, General Synod News Room (514) 398-5192; Cell phones: (514) 953-7981 (Carriere) or (514) 953-8091 (Chortyk)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.)
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (35th : 1998 : Montreal, Que.) - Theme
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Quebec (Province) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Quebec (Province) - Politics and government - 1994-
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Native peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indians of North America - Canada
Indians of North America - Quebec (Province)
Ryan, Claude, 1925-2004
Cools, Anne
Smith, Brian
Fraser, Joan
Coon-Come, Matthew
Less detail

Meech Lake Accord

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1942
Date
1987 October 19-21
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 45-10-87
Date
1987 October 19-21
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 45-10-87
Mover
Mrs. P. McBeth
Seconder
Mrs. H. Woolley
Text
That the National Executive Council ask the Primate to encourage all Anglicans whenever praying for provinces or provincial governments, to include territories or territorial governments. CARRIED #45-10-87
Subjects
Northwest Territories
Yukon Territory
Intercessory prayer - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 92
Mover
The Rev. Canon J.B. Peever
Seconder
Mrs. D.J. Maybee
Text
That this twenty-eighth session of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada affirms its belief in Canada as a nation and urges that future General synods sing the National Anthem along with the Royal Anthem. CARRIED ACT 92
Subjects
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Canada
National songs - Canada
O Canada
God Save the Queen
God Save the King
Less detail
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 75
Date
1977 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 75
Mover
The Rt. Rev. R. Hollis
Seconder
Mr. M.J. Holden
Text
That the Motion be amended by changing Section 1 to read:
"Recognizes the imperative to search for a true Canadian unity which recognizes both the needs of major cultural groupings to exist within our nation and the rights of minority groups within these cultures. CARRIED
The Motion as amended now reads
That the twenty-eighth Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, meeting in session:
1) Recognize the imperative to search for a true Canadian unity which recognizes both the needs of major cultural groupings to exist within our nation and the rights of minority groups within these cultures;
2) Convey a message to the Prime Minister of Canada and the First Ministers of the Provinces and Territories, declaring our concern that the just language cultural and identity rights of all citizens be recognized throughout the country;
3) Appoint a task force to continue consideration and clarification of the ways by which the Anglican Church of Canada can contribute to national unity.
the Motion as amended was put and CARRIED ACT 75
Subjects
Multiculturalism - Canada
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Minorities - Canada
Minorities - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nationalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of The Primate's Proposals Committee on the Church's Observance of Canada's Centennial (see p.292) - Resolution III [re manner of observance]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3938
Date
1962 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1962 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Canon E.W. Scott
Seconder
Rev. Canon A.E. Thain
Prologue
Moved by Bishop Hunt, seconded by the General Secretary G.S.,
That Resolution III be received.
Text
That subsection 1 of Resolution III be deleted. CARRIED in both Houses.
Moved by Bishop Hunt, seconded by the General Secretary G.S.,
That Resolution III as amended be adopted. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
That the following proposals for the Church's observance of Canada's Centennial be received and placed before the Centenary Committee, to be authorized by General Synod, for consideration and appropriate action:
1. (Deleted by General Synod).
2. The opportunity to all church members in Canada for "thanksgiving and reaffirmation" in an 8 a.m. celebration of Holy Communion on July 1, 1967, under the authority of the Bishops in their respective dioceses, such services from coast to coast to be preceded where possible by a peal of bells. Special Centennial Day prayers and/or a Service Form, prepared under the authority of the House of Bishops, may be issued for use on this day and the Sunday following.
3. The thankoffering at the Centennial Communion Services will form the nucleus of a Centennial Fund which, augmented from other sources, will be used for various Centennial projects, such as:
(i) The establishment of gymnasia and/or community halls for the use of Indian and Eskimo young people; provision also being made for post-graduate study for Indian and Eskimo Christian leaders.
(ii) The establishment of travel grants whereby two (or more) Canadians will receive funds for a year's study abroad, and two (or more) students, chosen in successive years from Asia, Africa, Japan, etc., will come to Canada. Such grants will not be for students in Divinity alone, but also for those in the various Arts, Science, Humanities, Medicine, etc.
(iii) The provision of scholarships for the cultivation of Christian leadership in Africa, Asia and the West Indies with the hope that graduates of exceptional promise might be brought to large centres of learning for post-graduate study.
(iv) The building of a school or hospital in a new dominion (ie: a member of the British Commonwealth of Nations).
(v) The creation of a stained-glass window in memory of Canada's pioneers to be installed in a central place in Canada, possibly a cathedral. This might be done in consultation with the Canadian National Committee on Canada's Centennial.
(vi) The erection in a suitable location in Western Canada (possibly an Indian reservation in Saskatchewan) of an Anglican Church, in native design, which by its architecture would contribute to a recognition of Indian culture and tradition.
4. The formation, under the authority of the Bishops, in each Diocese of a consultant group to:
(a) obtain ideas.
(b) correlate them and pass on the best suggestions to the National Centennial Year Committee for consideration.
(c) assist, where deemed advisable, the National Committee to carry out approved Canada-wide plans at the Diocesan level.
(d) (i) develop at diocesan level a Diocesan project which will benefit, if possible, many people, and would meet an urgent need.
(ii) Project could be in the field of:
. Social Service - Hospital
. - Rehabilitation Centre for men released from prison, Alcoholics, Drug Addicts.
. Education - Local college or school
. Theological Education - Expansion of area school
. - Bursaries
. Christian Education - Development of programme, Conference Centre.
(iii) Each diocesan project would be keyed for formal opening or inauguration on July 1st, 1967.
5. The publication of a Centenary Edition of the Prayer Book following the pattern set on previous national occasions.
6. A Centennial year programme, as developed by the G.B.R.E., for the attention and participation of children and young people.
7. In recognition of the importance of the contribution of Christianity to the development of Canada's history during the past hundred years and the fact that all Communions bear witness to the Saviourhood and Lordship of Jesus Christ, it is recommended that the Anglican Church of Canada, through its Centenary Committee, assert its willingness to cooperate with other Christian bodies in Canada in such projects as are suggested by the Canadian Council of Churches' Committee on the Canadian Centenary and which are approved by the General Synod Committee.
Subjects
Canada - Centennial celebrations, etc.
Canada - Centennial celebrations, etc. - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Religion
Indians of North America - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Native peoples - Canada
Nationalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of The Primate's Proposals Committee on the Church's Observance of Canada's Centennial (see p.292) - Resolution I [re Special Programme]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3936
Date
1962 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1962 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop Hunt
Seconder
General Secretary G.S.
Text
That Resolution I be adopted. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
That the Anglican Church of Canada develop a special programme for observing the year of Canada's Centenary, emphasizing the opportunity for thanksgiving and reaffirmation and urging Anglicans to witness to their contribution to Canada's Christian's life; and that this programme be considered apart from the proposed Anglican National Crusade.
Subjects
Canada - Centennial celebrations, etc.
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican National Crusade
Evangelism - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1983 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 111
Date
1983 June
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 111
Mover
Canon Wm. Portman
Seconder
Dr. J. Archer
Text
"That this General Synod request the Public Social Responsibility Unit to examine the changes proposed by the federal government in grain handling and transportation policies in Western Canada as an issue affecting national unity, and, if it thinks it appropriate, request the National Executive Council to issue a statement on the matter." CARRIED Act 111
Subjects
Transportation - Canada
Canada, Western
Wheat - Canada
Canada - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.