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Anglican Church Women - The Commission on Women

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3401
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Suffragan Bishop Appleyard of Huron
Seconder
Bishop of Nova Scotia
Text
Whereas Resolution 35 of the Lambeth Conference 1968 "requests every national and regional Church or Province to give careful study to the question of the ordination of women to the priesthood and to report its findings to the Lambeth Consultative Council (or Lambeth Consultative Body) which will make them available to the Anglican Communion."
Be it resolved
That this General Synod respectfully request the Primate to initiate, through a task force or commission, a study of the question of the ordination of women to the priesthood, for report to the next session of General Synod.
This was in substitution of Resolution 1, page 264. The motion was CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Ordination of women - Anglican Church of Canada
Ordination of women - Anglican Communion
Lambeth Conference, 1968
Anglican Consultative Council
Less detail

Anglican Consultative Council

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3418
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Huron
Seconder
Bishop of Cariboo
Text
That we approve the formation of the Anglican Consultative Council as recommended by the Lambeth Conference and ask the National Executive Council to provide our share for its support from the National Budget and to elect members to represent the Canadian Church in the Council. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council
Anglican Consultative Council - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Anglican Consultative Council
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Anglican Communion
Less detail

Anglican Consultative Council

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2916
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1976 November 10-12
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Graham
Seconder
Peers
Prologue
Archbishop Scott, Dean Peers and Dr. Betty Graham reported on the meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council held in Trinidad, March 1976.
Text
That the request for appointments for Correspondents and Consultants be referred to the Nominating Committee of the National Executive Council for their action and submission of names to the Anglican Consultative Council. CARRIED
Notes
Regarding the engaging of a Communications Officer for the Anglican Consultative Council, the Primate reported that budget provision has been made for this, subject to further study by the Standing Committee.
The members of the National Executive Council were urged to use the Cycle of Prayer produced by the Anglican Consultative Council, and it was agreed that it should be used at meetings of the National Executive Council.
Resolutions which require action by the Anglican Church of Canada were reviewed.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (3rd : 1976 : Trinidad)
Anglican Consultative Council. Communications Officer
Anglican Consultative Council - Resolutions
Anglican Cycle of Prayer
Less detail

Anglican world body appoints new leader

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article23
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
News Service [Anglican Church of Canada]
Date
1982 November 2

Anglican World Body Appoints New Leader

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3194
Date
1982 November 2
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1982 November 2
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Nov. 02, 1982 -- For immediate release
The Anglican Consultative Council (A.C.C.) is a representative body of bishops, clergy and laity from the 28 self-governing Provinces of the 64 million member Anglican Communion. Its tasks include planning international mission policy, ecumenical initiatives and fostering cooperation and communication amongst parts of the world-wide Anglican family.
The Archbishop of Canterbury is President of the Council. He and its Chairman, Mr. John G. Denton, have announced the appointment of a new Secretary-General of the A.C.C. He is the Rev. Dr. Samuel Van Culin of New York City. At present Dr. Van Culin is Executive for World Mission for the Episcopal Church, U.S.A. The fifty-one year old native of Honolulu has been involved in the mission of the Church in the U.S.A. for over 20 years.
He succeeds Bishop John Howe who is retiring after 14 years as Secretary-General.
The Archbishop of Canterbury welcomed the appointment of Dr. Van Culin, "He is known and respected all over the world for the warmth of his friendship and the range of his abilities. He will bring to his new work a rare blend of imaginative Christian sympathies and outstanding administrative competence."
The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop E.W. Scott noted that there had been real efforts to bring a third world person into this position. "Sam was conscious of that effort," he declared, "and wholeheartedly supported it. When it proved impossible he accepted the challenge. He brings extensive personal knowledge of all the major areas of the world. I am confident that he will do a very good job, but we in the Communion must give him adequate support for an extremely demanding task."
In addition to his duties as chief administrative officer of the ACC, the Secretary-General is Chairman of the Council of the Anglican Centre in Rome, the focus of Anglican relations with the Vatican and Europe. He also assists the Archbishop of Canterbury in the organization and planning of meetings of the Lambeth Conference, and of separate meetings of the Primates of the Anglican Communion.
Dr. Van Culin's appointment is the culmination of a 13 month selection process by a panel made up of representatives from Australia, East Asia, Scotland and Uganda. Laity and clergy from all over the world were considered. The final interviews and appointment were carried out by the ACC Standing Committee which also had persons from Australia, Canada, England, Tanzania, the USA and the West Indies, with the Archbishop of Canterbury.
The appointment is effective on January 1st, 1983. Dr. Van Culin will live in London, England, but his work will take him to virtually every part of the world.
- 30 -
For further information, please contact:
R.J. Berryman
Media Officer
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council
Anglican Consultative Council. General Secretary
Van Culin, Samuel, 1930-
Less detail

Authority in the Anglican Communion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1505
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-2-88
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 7-2-88
Mover
Bishop Bothwell
Seconder
Archbishop Hambidge
Prologue
In response to the request of the Anglican Consultative Council that each Province in the Anglican Communion examine authority in the Anglican Communion, a task force was established in Canada. The members are: Bishop John Baycroft representing the House of Bishops; The Reverend Michael Ingham representing the National Executive Council; and Mrs. Patricia Bays who is a member of the Anglican Consultative Council. The report of the Canadian Church is to go to the Anglican Consultative Council before the end of March.
Mrs. Bays, Bishop Baycroft and Mr. Ingham each addressed the House.
Appendix A [Appendix A consisting of 7 pages of text is NOT included in the electronic database.]
Mrs. Bays distributed a summary of the Bishops' discussions of the previous day. Questions and discussion followed on what should be done with the document.
These centred on the following issues:
1. Economic considerations - if the structures are increased, then increased costs will ensue. What then, can be subtracted from the structures and still maintain the work that has to be done ?
2. Some discomfort was felt about the possibility of "drifting into Primacy".
3. Should we increase the complexity of our structures ? Could areas use their own moderator ?
4. Where does this document go ?
It was pointed out that National Executive Council asked the House of Bishops to look at this issue, and the Anglican Consultative Council asked the same of Synods and Standing Committees.
Text
That we receive the document "Authority in the Anglican Communion" developed through discussion and consideration, and offered as an expression of the opinion of the House of Bishops on this subject;
That it be forwarded to the National Executive Council and, if appropriate, to Lambeth as a contribution to the continuing dialogue on the whole subject of authority. CARRIED
Notes
APPENDIX B
AUTHORITY IN THE ANGLICAN CHURCH
A. The issue of authority in the Church impinges on us as bishops in several ways. We are called upon to exercise authority in the ordering of ministry, in ordaining and licensing clergy, in the sacraments of Christian Initiation, in shaping the liturgical life of our dioceses, and in preaching and teaching the Gospel. The Church's authority has its source in God who calls us into unity with each other under the lordship of Christ. Episcopal authority is grounded in, and expressed through, the Koinonia of the Church.
B. If the true purpose of authority is to unify, in practice the exercise of it becomes the occasion for diverse reaction. The recent activity of some bishops within the Communion acting outside their diocesan jurisdiction has raised questions about episcopal collegiality. Liturgical renewal has generated hostility and fear of change in some quarters, resulting in a challenge to episcopal authority itself. Theological development which has evolved new images of the nature of God has produced new models of authority which challenge our present structures. Political and economic changes in society have generated individualistic concepts of authority which seem to be in conflict with the Church's understanding of Koinonia.
C. Within this context, we are compelled to ask about our identity as members of the Anglican Communion. The issue of authority raises the question of identity. Our tradition has been that of a family of autonomous Churches united by our common desire to belong to one another. We affirm that tradition precisely because it is conciliar rather than legislative. We would like to see the instruments of unity strengthened in the Communion, but in such a way that their authority remains consultative and persuasive. We have no desire to see an Anglican "Curia". The following are ways in which the centre of authority in the Communion might be developed.
D. We affirm the special role of the Archbishop of Canterbury as a personal symbol of unity with the Communion. Some of us wish to affirm the role as it presently is. But the office is developing into a more international role, with the Archbishop visiting other provinces and asked for comments on their situations. Some therefore would prefer to see the role enhanced in order to allow the effective functioning of the office. There is value in the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury as diocesan bishop, in rooting this office in the particulars of a place. A primacy of honour might be exercised by the Archbishop of Canterbury himself, but another person might serve as moderator of a conference or president of the Anglican Consultative Council.
E. The Lambeth Conference brings to the whole Communion a sense of unity and common purpose. We recognize that the Lambeth Conference is becoming unwieldy in size and cost, and we suggest that other structures, processes, and alternative venues be explored. We cannot describe at this time what these structures might be. Regional meetings, to include both affluent and less affluent provinces, would build better communication and mutual understanding.
F. We believe the meetings of Primates should be held in conjunction with those of another group -- either the Lambeth conference or the Anglican Consultative Council -- again in order to foster communication and interdependence.
G. The Anglican Consultative Council is an important vehicle of unity since it expresses the synodical model of the Church by its inclusion of priests and lay people as well as bishops. We are agreed that it is important to develop the representation of the laity on the Council, particularly in the area of women and youth. Regional meetings and the more frequent convening of an Anglican Congress could promote this greater involvement. It is important to provide adequate staff and financial support to the work of the Council. We are undecided, however, as to what authority the statements of the Council should have. There is an optimum size for Council and staff and it ought not to grow too large. There is a danger in building up structures. The demands on time and money are great, and the purpose of the structures needs to be remembered.
H. We recognize that our history and geography in Canada have helped us to understand the concept of unity in diversity. We affirm the necessity for interdependence in this large country. All dioceses have gifts to share, and needs which can be met by the gifts of others. In our Canadian experience a number of models have developed which illustrate this unity in diversity. The Council of the North is a good example of the concept of partnership expressed through transparency and mutual accountability. The ecumenical coalitions provide a model of effective planning for social concerns. Decision making by consensus in the House of Bishops requires a high level of trust. We have learned a great deal about regional consultation through our experience in ACNAC [Anglican Council of North America and the Caribbean].
I. We recognize the importance of giving assent to structures of authority. We choose to remain in communion with each other. As issues arise in the Communion on which we have differing views, it will be important for provinces to commit themselves to work together to seek ways of expressing our unity in diversity. We need to listen to each other prayerfully and with sensitivity, recognizing that there must be in the Anglican Communion a tolerance for diversity and a reluctance to define every issue too closely. Our involvement in international structures needs to be communicated clearly to the local congregations, so that they can be aware of the importance of maintaining these links within the Communion.
Subjects
Authority (Religion) - Anglican Church of Canada
Authority (Religion) - Anglican Communion
Authority in the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Government
Church of England. Archbishop of Canterbury
Anglican Consultative Council
Decision-making - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Decision-making - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Bishops - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Bishops
Lambeth Conference
Anglican Communion. Primates Meeting
Less detail

Bishop John Paterson : Face to Face

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30144
Author
Soto, Onell A. (Onell Asiselo), 1932-2015
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2003 Easter
Author
Soto, Onell A. (Onell Asiselo), 1932-2015
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2003 Easter
Issue
109
Page
41
Notes
Bishop Onell Soto interviewed Bishop John Paterson, Primate of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, and new Chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, about the role of the Anglican Consultative Council and his role within it.
Subjects
Paterson, John (John Campbell), 1945-
Anglican Consultative Council
Social networks - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Communication - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Less detail

[Bishop of Huron Recommends Unified Plan for Anglican Communion]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5258
Date
1968 April 30
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1968 April 30
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Taking his cue from the climate of reform in Roman Catholicism and the developing ecumenical movement, Rt. Rev. G.N. Luxton, Bishop of Huron, says the Anglican Communion's 19 independent churches should adopt a unified plan to stimulate its work of world mission.
In an article entitled "A Blueprint for the Anglican Communion" in the May issue of Canadian Churchman, the London, Ontario bishop suggests the creation of a central council which he believes could plan and act without seriously disturbing the autonomy of the various churches. Canadian Churchman is the national publication of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Bishop Luxton calls on the 500 bishops of the communion who will meet this summer in London, England, for the 10th Lambeth Conference, to take preliminary steps and set up provisional committees in preparation for a revised and representative Anglican Congress. The congress, he says, should sponsor the central council and be the administrative forum for the communion with a modest legislative responsibility.
The Lambeth Conference - the first was held in 1867 - is held normally every 10 years on the invitation of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Delegates are restricted to bishops of the Anglican Communion. The first Anglican Congress was held in Minneapolis in 1954, the second in Toronto in 1963 and the next is planned for 1973. Delegates include bishops, priests and members of the laity from all over the world. Neither the conference nor the congress has any legislative authority, but their recommendations carry considerable weight both inside and outside religious circles.
"The Toronto Congress went part way toward achieving representative status," says Bishop Luxton. "Most of the new world dioceses elected their representatives by ballot or similar procedures. For 1973 we would, I hope, widen their representative function and authorize them to speak and act for us in the following fields: world mission; study, research and planning for mission; and support, administration and financing of the congress, its duly elected communion council, and the united work of world mission accepted as the responsibility of a united Anglican Communion."
Chairmanship of the central council, he suggests, should be an elective and rotating post with occupants chosen from among the bishops, clergy or laity of the Anglican body and serving for not more than five years. He believes Anglicans would oppose the erection of "another hierarchical throne at the centre of our communion." Council members could be elected in the same way, with each serving for a three-year period. Biannual meetings of the council are suggested.
The Canadian bishop says he is appealing for an aggiornamento, or renewal, in Anglicanism comparable to that now stirring the Roman Catholic Church.
"It is one that will give us unity, democratic decisions, modern research and competent administration on the Anglican Communion level, which already most of us enjoy on the parish, diocesan, provincial and national levels."
- 30 -
Subjects
Luxton, George N.
Anglican Communion - 20th century
Anglican Communion - Government
Anglican Consultative Council
Anglican Consultative Council - History
Anglican Congress (1963 : Toronto, Ont.)
Anglican Communion - Congresses
Less detail

Church joins call to write off poor countries' debt

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article24368
Author
Larmondin, Leanne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1997 December
Author
Larmondin, Leanne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1997 December
Volume
123
Issue
10
Page
7
Notes
The Anglican Church of Canada will join churches around the world in the Call for Jubilee.
Stephen Toope was elected as lay representative to the Anglican Consultative Council.
Subjects
Debts, External - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Jubilee 2000
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of General Synod
Toope, Stephen J., 1958-
Anglican Consultative Council
Less detail

Committee on Ministry

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4519
Date
1972 November 8-10
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1972 November 8-10
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Somerville
Seconder
Soward
Prologue
It was stated that the Committee on Ministry is recommending: that General Synod accept the principle of the Ordination of Women to the priesthood, and that this decision be communicated to the Anglican Consultative Council.
Text
That this NEC approve co-operation with the Episcopal Church in their study of the sociological aspects of the possible deployment of women priests. CARRIED
Subjects
Ordination of women - Anglican Church of Canada
Women clergy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Consultative Council
Ordination of women - Anglican Communion
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.