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ACC: stop navel-gazing

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article26238
Journal
Church Times
Date
1999 September 24
Journal
Church Times
Date
1999 September 24
Issue
7128
Page
7
Notes
Delegates to the Anglican Consultative Council complained that too much time was being spent on navel-gazing instead of dealing with the real problems in the world.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (11th : 1999 : Dundee, Scotland)
Anglican Communion - Government
Authority - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Beresford, Eric B. (Eric Brian), 1957-
Less detail
Publication Date
1963
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BV 2500 A96 no. 4
Corporate Author
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Place
[Saffron Walden, Eng.]
Publisher
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Publication Date
1963
Physical_Description
12 p. ; 21.5 x 14 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
Cover title.
At head of cover: confidential.
"In this report -- more accurately a 'working paper' -- I make proposals for the next stage of development of the Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy. Although I take full and personal responsibility for the proposals, I want to acknowledge with great gratitude the counsel and help given by a number of colleagues. .... To my thanks, let me add a few preliminary comments. First, these proposals are complementary to others which deal specifically with the Executive Officer's office and staff. .... The fact that the Executive Officer serves two bodies, and that separate groups of interest are involved, should however be kept in mind. A number of suggestions have been made, for example, which really relate to the Lambeth Consultative Body rather than the ACMS. .... Second, there have been -- indeed there still are -- some troubling misconceptions about my own office, and about the ACMS. I mention now four of these, because I think it is useful to clear away as much of the underbrush as possible before we tackle the main issues. The first has to do with 'authority' or 'power' of the ACMS and its Executive Officer. As I wrote to Archbishop Fisher in 1959, when we were exploring all this, it is essential in my view, that the Executive Officer have no constitutional or coercive authority. .... A second apprehension is related to this -- it has to do with money. .... Then, third, there has been a tendency to think of the ACMS as a means by which something is to be done for somebody else. .... Finally (and no doubt in large part because membership of the ACMS is by churches), there had been a measure of apprehension lest it represent a decision by the Anglican Communion against the 'society' principle of missionary support. .... So much by way of clearing the ground. Now I should like to speak about the four main principles which seem to me to be the determining elements in any planning for the ACMS". -- Intro.
Contents: Introduction / Stephen F. Bayne, Jr. -- I: Principles -- II: Practical Necessities -- III: Specific Proposals / Stephen F. Bayne, Jr.
Note printed on verso of t.-p.: "N.B. This document is confidential, until released by the Executive Officer. It is intended for circulation and discussion by the members of the Lambeth Consultative Body and the Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy, and such advisory and other persons only as are designated to receive it. It has no official standing or authority save as may be given it by appropriate action. Its use for general public discussion is not authorized".
Series
ACMS 63/4
Added Entry
Bayne, Stephen F. (Stephen Fielding), 1908-1974
Subjects
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Anglican Communion - Structure
Anglican Communion - Government
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy. Executive Officer
Lambeth Consultative Body. Executive Officer
Anglican Consultative Council. Executive Officer - History
Call Number
BV 2500 A96 no. 4
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Agenda for Anglicans

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog7076
Author
Morgan, Dewi (Dewi Lewis), 1916-1993
Publication Date
1963
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 5005 M65 1963
Author
Morgan, Dewi (Dewi Lewis), 1916-1993
Place
London
Publisher
SCM Press
Publication Date
1963
Physical_Description
167 p. ; 18.2 x 12 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Dewi Morgan, Rector of St. Bride's, Fleet Street, London, formerly Editorial Secretary, Society for the Propagation of the Gospel".
"With a Preface by Bishop Stephen Bayne, Executive Officer of the Anglican Communion".
"First Published 1963. Copyright Dewi Morgan 1963. Published simultaneously by SCM Press Ltd., London and Morehouse-Barlow Co., New York". -- verso of t.-p.
Includes bibliographical references.
"The background of this book is the turbulent world of the 1960s, and the ecumenical revolution within the Christian churches. Amid so much change, what is the role of the Anglican Communion ? To put it better: what use has God for Anglicans. The author frankly examines the source of authority for Anglicans, the administration of the mission in principle and practice, and the prayer and conversation that unite this curious family of 40 millions. .... This book ... is being published simultaneously by Morehouse-Barlow, New York, in connection with the international Anglican Congress in Toronto, August 1963. But it is a book which will keep its value until the next Lambeth Conference, to which it looks forward". -- back cover.
Contents: Preface / Stephen F. Bayne, Jr. -- Author's Foreword -- Authority and Freedom -- Regional and National Churches -- Is Anglicanism a 'Confession' ? -- The Administration of Mission: In Principle -- The Administration of Mission: Day by Day -- The Family Which Prays Together -- Family Ties -- Epilogue.
OTCH Note. The author makes particular mention of the Anglican Church of Canada in the Foreword, saying: "My indebtedness to others will be obvious and my inability to make acknowledgements manifest. But one act of recognition must be recorded. It is to the Missionary Society of the Anglican Church in Canada. It was the deep privilege of an invitation to lecture to a seminar in London, Ontario, which proved the final stimulus to put down on paper thoughts which for years had clamoured inside me for expression but which, aware of a sense of my own incompetence, I had so often decided to leave to others more capable (p. 12)".
Series
Living church books
Subjects
Anglican Communion - 20th century
Authority - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Government
Anglican Communion - Structure
Missions - Anglican Communion
Missions - Societies, etc. - Anglican Communion
Book of Common Prayer
Liturgical movement - Anglican Communion
Liturgical renewal - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Liturgy
Call Number
BX 5005 M65 1963
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

'A mirror for the life of our church' : The history and role of the primacy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42061
Author
Gardner, Matt
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 March
Author
Gardner, Matt
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 March
Volume
145
Issue
3
Page
8-9
Notes
"The primacy has evolved throughout the history of the church. In 1893, the church's first primate was a diocesan bishop chosen from among the metropolitans whose only specific duties were to serve as president of General Synod and of the House of Bishops. Since that time, the office of primate has steadily grown to encompass a national episcopal ministry, in which the primate serves as a figure of unity and a reflection of the diversity, challenges and ministries of the church" (p. 8). "Misunderstandings about the primate's role are common, according to Archdeacon Paul Feheley, who has served as principal secretary to the last two primates. Anglicans on different sides of various debates will often send letters to [the Primate Archbishop] Hiltz asking for him to intervene in order to resolve an issue. But, Feheley notes, metropolitans actually have far more influence over matters than the primate. ... 'If you're looking for a whole ton of power, it's not the position to go for', he adds" (p. 8). "'Many of our early primates died from overwork', says [retired Bishop Michael] Ingham. 'The job is just too large for an incumbent to exercise responsibilities as a diocesan bishop as well. This has only become more true over time, rather than less. In 1969, General Synod adopted the model of a detached primacy, in which primates were no longer burdened by the responsibilities of a diocesan bishop" (p. 9). "[Former Primate Michael] Peers traces the seeds of reform to the 1830s, when Thomas Fuller proposed a synodical model of church government, in which dioceses would be led by a synod, or governing body of licensed clergy, lay representatives from the diocese's parishes, ex officio members, and the bishops. Over the following decades, this became the model the church follows today" (p. 9). "An 1893 [Solemn] Declaration which established the Church of England in Canada as a separate and independent body described the church as being 'in full communion' with the Church of England (as opposed to 'an integral portion'), Peers noted. ... 'In a time when there has been pressure to make the Communion more monolithic, more a single entity presided over by primates, I continue to look to this foundational document'" (p. 9). "'Our primates have been and are people of exemplary faith and integrity, asked to hold together the wide diversity of our Anglican Church of Canada with its challenges of geography, cultural and theological differences', [Bishop Linda] Nicholls says. 'Our primate is a mirror for the life of our church, and deserves our deepest commitment of prayer and support'" (p. 9).
Article includes a large colour photo of the primatial cross with caption: "The primatial cross is the only official symbol of the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. It was presented to General Synod in 1937 after the submission of numerous designs. The cross is made of silver gilt and features the arms of General Synod and of the four original dioceses of the Canadian church".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate - Office
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - History
Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Archbishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada - Government
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Solemn Declaration
Anglican Communion - Government
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Feheley, Paul (Allan Paul)
Ingham, Michael (Michael Colin), 1949-
Nicholls, Linda (Linda Carol), 1954-
Less detail

The Anglican Communion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5147
Date
1973 July 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1973 July 6
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
The Anglican Consultative Council reports that 65.4 million people in the world profess to be Anglican (or Episcopalian) and 2,877,000 of them live in Canada.
The total number of Anglicans is growing about one million a year. One in four of its members is a communicant. They are served by 560 bishops and more than 40,000 clergymen. The Anglican communion is a world-wide family which includes 22 autonomous "national" churches in which 93 principal countries are represented. Each member of this catholic church makes its own rules and appoints its own officers. In 1971-72, for the first time, the number of Anglicans outside England (32.9 million) was greater than the number in England (32.5 million).
As the proportion of English Anglicans decreases that of African Anglicans increases.
This international and inter-racial family shares common attitudes and inherited traditions, has a mutual recognition of ministers and a "mutual responsibility and interdependence in the Body of Christ."
The Anglican Church of Canada's general policy states that "the church is the Body of Christ and as such is concerned with the totality of human existence and man's eternal destiny. It is called to proclaim the Gospel of God's redeeming love through Christ, and deliverance from sin and from all that mars human life."
The habit of family consultation was started over 100 years ago with bishops meeting at Lambeth Conferences every 10 years. During the 1960's it was recognized that in the fast-changing world there was need for more frequent discussion and exchange of information.
This resulted in the formation of the Anglican Consultative Council, a non-legislative body which brings clerical and lay delegates from each member church together. Its first meeting was in Limuru, Kenya in 1971. It meets for the second time this year, in Dublin, Ireland.
Secretary-General of the Council and formerly Executive Officer of the Anglican Communion, Rt. Rev. John W.A. Howe, says, "We live is a world where social and political situations can and do tear apart families and separate friends." He sees the Council as continuing the tradition of consultation which is of the essence of Anglican cohesion and the Anglican life style and serves as "an instrument of common action."
The two basic units of the Anglican Communion are the diocese and the parish. In the beginning, probably only one church existed in a city under the direction and control of a Bishop, seen as the successor to the Apostles. The Bishop was assisted by a number of presbyters (or priests) and deacons. The latter were chiefly concerned with works of charity. As the church spread out, and more than one church was established in a city, the Bishop left priests in charge of various congregations. When a congregation was small, two or more churches came under the care of one priest. This unit was called a parish. The parish then became a geographical area consisting of one or more churches. A diocese looked after by a Bishop is an area consisting of a number of parishes. Each diocese is in some ways, though not entirely, autonomous. Several dioceses are grouped together to form an ecclesiastical province which is in the care of an Archbishop known as a Metropolitan.
Dioceses, provinces and national churches all have their synods. In almost all cases, bishops, clergy and laity consult together in the interests of the church. The Bishop works in partnership with the people of his diocese (clergy and lay) and the priest works in partnership with his congregation, always conscious of Christ's dictum: "He who would be greatest among you must be as one that serves."
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
5 Archbishops - The Primate and the 4 Metropolitans
37 Bishops
1,822 clergy
Parish membership - 1.2 million
4 ecclesiastical provinces - Canada, which covers the maritime region, Montreal and part of Quebec; Rupert's Land, including northern Quebec, northern Ontario, the prairies and the Arctic; Ontario, covers parts of Ontario and Quebec; British Columbia (and the Yukon)
28 dioceses and an additional area known as the "episcopal district" of Mackenzie.
- 30 -
July 6, 1973
For more information contact:
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
924-9192
Subjects
Anglican Communion - History
Anglican Communion - Statistics
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Consultative Council - History
Anglican Communion - Government
Less detail

Anglican Communion must be distinct from Church of England: Ndungane

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article26743
Author
McAteer, Michael R., 1933-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 October
Author
McAteer, Michael R., 1933-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 October
Volume
125
Issue
8
Page
9
Notes
Archbishop Ndungane believes that the Anglican Communion needs reforming and that the head of the Communion should be chosen from among the primates or even all bishops. He also said that "the Church of England needs to be `liberated' from the notion that it is the Anglican Communion. "His experience at last year's Lambeth Conference reinforced his view that the conference needs reforming. `We (almost) live in the 21st century and you cannot bring 750 bishops to a conference as if it were a tea party with a host and hostess marshalling us around,' Archbishop Ndungane said. `It's got to have structures in place for doing business if we want the mind of the communion to be expressed'."
Subjects
Ndungane, W.H. Njongonkulu (Winston Hugh Njongonkulu), 1941-
Anglican Communion - Africa
Anglican Communion - Government
Lambeth Conference
Church of England - Relations - Anglican Communion
Church of England. Archbishop of Canterbury
Less detail

The Anglican Executive Officer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6190
Publication Date
1963
Material Type
Book : Paper
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BV 2500 A96 no. 5
Corporate Author
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Place
[Saffron Walden, Eng.]
Publisher
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Publication Date
1963
Physical_Description
11 p. ; 21.5 x 14 cm.
Material Type
Book : Paper
Notes
Cover title.
At head of cover: confidential.
"An important sector of my work, these three and a half years, has been the exploration of this new office, its usefulness and its needs. I'm sure that none who supported the proposal at Lambeth, 1958, would have felt able to give more than a partial job description, at best. .... It was understood, I felt, that one of my first duties must be to explore what was required and what was appropriate, if the hopes of the bishops were to be fulfilled. What I now present is is the result of that exploration, at least as far as specific recommendations for the next stage in the development of this office, and the reasons for them. I add four prefatory notes. First, this paper should be read in conjunction with the parallel proposals on the structure of the Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy. Second I would hope that it might be read as having the least possible personal reference to myself. .... The third comment is really only to underline the word 'appropriate' as used two paragraphs before. .... Finally, I believe it is not yet possible to think of the Executive Officer as a position rather than a person." -- Intro.
Contents: Introduction / Stephen F. Bayne, Jr. -- I: Questions -- II: Summary / Stephen F. Bayne, Jr.
Note printed on verso of t.-p.: "N.B. This document is confidential, until released by the Executive Officer. It is intended for circulation and discussion by the members of the Lambeth Consultative Body and the Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy, and such advisory and other persons only as are designated to receive it. It has no official standing or authority save as may be given it by appropriate action. Its use for general public discussion is not authorized".
Series
ACMS 63/5
Added Entry
Bayne, Stephen F. (Stephen Fielding), 1908-1974
Subjects
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy
Anglican Communion - Structure
Anglican Communion - Government
Advisory Council on Missionary Strategy. Executive Officer
Lambeth Consultative Body. Executive Officer
Anglican Consultative Council. Executive Officer - History
Call Number
BV 2500 A96 no. 5
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

An Introduction to Anglican polity

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog3509
Author
Ervin, Spencer, 1886-1967
Publication Date
c1964
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 5150 E78 1964
Author
Ervin, Spencer, 1886-1967
Place
Ambler, Pa.
Publisher
Trinity Press
Publication Date
c1964
Physical_Description
xiii, 83, 8, 12, 21, 2 p. ; 21 x 13.6 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[B]y Spencer Ervin".
"Copyright 1964 by Spencer Ervin". -- verso of t.-p.
"Vol. 1 of a series on the government of the Churches of the Anglican Communion". -- p. [vi].
"The series to which this brochure is the introduction presents to Anglicans, in separate brochures, an account of the history of each self-governing national Church or province of the Anglican Communion, followed in each case by an account of its polity, with references to the canonical and other sources. The history is ancillary, its object being only to further an understanding of the polity to which it relates. The purpose of the series is to give to each main component of the Anglican Communion a better knowledge and understanding of the others, and by discovery of excellences and deficiencies in governmental structures and practices to facilitate improvement. Brochures on The Church of the Province of South Africa, The Episcopal Church in Scotland, and the Church of Ireland have been written and will be published in rapid sequence after the appearance of this Introduction. The account of the Anglican Church of Canada is in preparation. Those of other provinces will appear as rapidly as possible". -- Preface, p. ix.
"Polity is a general term which refers equally to the general form of a government, secular or ecclesiastical, to its framework, or to its administration. In this series it will refer, with one exception, only to the structure and processes of government, that is, to the framework and administration: a limited part of the whole field, for the polity of the Church extends to the ordering and regulation of all matters with which the Church as a society is concerned. Holy Matrimony has been exceptionally included as of vital importance". -- p. 1.
Includes bibliographical references but NO index.
Errata slip laid in.
Contents: Preface dated Bala, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., February 1964 / Spencer Ervin -- I: Polity, Its Nature and Problems -- II: The Limitations of Polity -- III: Orders and Jurisdiction -- IV: Agents and Agencies of Church Government -- V: Marriage -- VI: Discipline -- VII: Authority -- Appendix I: Some Solutions of the Problem of Patronage -- Appendix II: The Marriage Legislation of the American Episcopal Church -- Appendix III: The Committee Reports, A to G, of the Lambeth Conference of 1867, with the Resolutions on Which the Reports are Based, and Resolution I of the Adjourned Conference -- Appendix IV: Some References on the Subject of Authority.
Chapter IV: Agents and Agencies of Church Government divided into sections: A: The Provincial Synod -- B: The Episcopal Synod -- C: The Diocesan Synod -- D: Metropolitans -- E: The Metropolitical See -- F: Archbishops -- G: Primates and Primacies -- H: Bishops -- I: Bishops, continued -- J: Bishops, continued -- K: Assistant Bishops (Coadjutors and Suffragans) -- L: Diocesan Bishops: Powers and Duties -- M: Dioceses -- N: Cathedrals and Cathedral Chapters -- O: Pastoral Charges -- P: Parish Government.
Chapter V: Marriage divided into sections: Traditional Rules -- The Pauline Privilege -- Some Questions -- Current Problems.
Chapter VI: Discipline divided into sections: 1. Tribunals -- 2. Offences -- 3. Accusations -- 4. Trial -- 5. Penalties -- 6. Judgment, Sentence and Review.
Series
Churches of the Anglican Communion ; 1
Subjects
Anglican Communion - Government
Canon law - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Structure
Marriage (Canon law) - Anglican Communion
Marriage - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Marriage - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Divorce - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Divorce - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Church discipline - Anglican Communion
Authority - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Call Number
BX 5150 E78 1964
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

An introduction to world Anglicanism

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog6300
Author
Kaye, Bruce (Bruce Norman), 1939-
Publication Date
2008
Material Type
Book
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Call Number
BX 5005 K39 2008
Author
Kaye, Bruce (Bruce Norman), 1939-
Edition
1st ed.
Place
Cambridge
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
2008
Physical_Description
ix, 276 p. ; 22.5 x 15 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"[By] Bruce Kaye".
Includes bibliographical references (p. 260-271) and index.
"What is the nature of world Anglicanism in a postcolonial, global age ? With talk of fragmentation constantly in the media, what does it mean to be 'Anglican' ? This book presents Anglicanism as a conversation over time amongst a community of people held together by sets of practice and beliefs. The first part describes the emergence of Anglicanism and its foundations in older Christian traditions. The second [part] looks at Anglican practices within the framework of changing understandings of mission, and focuses on liturgy, patterns of engagement with others, organisation and power in the church, and ministerial offices. There are two separate chapters on the ordination of women and homosexuality in the public life of the church. The third part, on beliefs, addresses the central question of knowledge and authority in Anglicanism, as well as ecclesiology, the nature of the church itself. A final chapter looks to the future". -- back cover,
Contents divided into three main parts: Part I: Foundations -- Part II: The Practices of Mission -- Part III: Beliefs.
Contents: Acknowledgements -- List of abbreviations and sources -- The nature of the story as tradition -- Forming an Anglican nation in England -- Forming Anglican churches around the world -- Changing outlooks -- Liturgical formation -- Patterns of engagement: political -- Patterns of engagement: relating to other traditions -- Influence, organisation and power in the church -- Ministerial offices: ordination -- Ministerial offices: ordination of women -- Ministerial offices: homosexuality and the public life of the church -- Knowledge and authority in the conversation -- Ecclesiology -- Other themes in the contemporary agenda -- Quo vadis ? -- Bibliography -- Index.
Contents include "Time line of 'official' organisations of the Anglican Communion" p.134-135.
Author is a priest in the Anglican Church of Australia and former provincial General Secretary (1994-2004).
Series
Introduction to religion
Subjects
Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - History
Liturgy - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Liturgy
Church and state - Anglican Communion
Church and the world - Anglican Communion
Christianity and politics - Anglican Communion - 20th century
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Communion
Bilateral dialogues
Anglican Communion - Government
Anglican Communion - Structure
Power - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Ministry - Anglican Communion
Ordination - Anglican Communion
Ordination of women - Anglican Communion
Ordination of women - Anglican Communion - History
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Same sex unions - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Doctrines
Theology - Anglican Communion - 20th century
Inter-Anglican Theological and Doctrinal Commission
Church - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Forecasting
ISBN
978-0-521-61866-3 (pbk.)
Call Number
BX 5005 K39 2008
Location
Trinity College (Graham Library)
Less detail

Archbishop Carey : Ecce sacerdos magnus : five years on

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article20933
Author
Rosenthal, James M. (James Milton), 1951-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1996 Pentecost
Author
Rosenthal, James M. (James Milton), 1951-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1996 Pentecost
Issue
82
Page
20-21
Notes
"In April 1996, the Archbishop of Canterbury celebrated the fifth anniversary of his enthronement as spiritual leader of the Anglican Communion. His travels, with his wife Eileen and various staff members and colleagues, have taken him around the globe to see the work, witness and worship of Anglican Christians. He has given hundreds of sermons, addresses and talks, and indeed, much has been said about many things. However, as someone who has had the privilege of being on some of these pastoral visits, I can heartily say that the effectiveness of much of the visits comes from what I will call the ministry of `presence'."
Subjects
Carey, George L. (George Leonard), 1935-
Anglican Communion - 20th century
Anglican Communion - Government
Less detail

82 records – page 1 of 9.