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Algoma, parish celebrate

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article1570
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1989 September

Anger over abuse must be transformed into useful energy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article26680
Author
Harris, David
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 October
Author
Harris, David
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 October
Volume
125
Issue
8
Page
4
Notes
Editorial examines the judgement on the Lytton case and peoples' reaction to it. Author also looks at some peoples' response to sexual abuse by church workers.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Employers' liability - Canada
Bauman, Lynn C. (Lynn Charles), 1942-
Less detail

Anglican diocese ponders uncertain future, as government lawsuits drain assets

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7562
Date
2000 October 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2000 October 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
QUESNEL, Friday, October 13, 2000 -- What may be the final synod, or annual meeting, of the Diocese of Cariboo began this afternoon in the usual way, with worship.
Approximately 85 members of the diocese represent its 17 parishes, which stretch along the Fraser and Thompson Rivers from Merritt to Prince George. Over the next three days, gathered in a community recreation center in Quesnel, they will consider the unprecedented possibility of winding up the diocese as a result of lawsuits arising from abuse that took place more than 30 years ago at St. George's School, Lytton.
St. George's was founded by the New England Company, an independent mission agency based in England, and eventually sold to the Government of Canada. Under the terms of the sale, the Bishop of Cariboo could nominate an Anglican priest as principal. The federal department of Indian Affairs had authority to accept or reject this nomination. The government operated St. George's until the early 1970s.
Derek Clarke, a former dormitory supervisor at St. George's, has been convicted of sexual abuse. Following the conviction a number of Clarke's victims launched lawsuits for damages against the Government of Canada and, in some cases, against the church.
Only one case has come to judgment, and it is now under appeal. The Diocese of Cariboo is a defendant in an additional 14 cases. Twelve of these cases are third-party actions brought by the federal Department of Justice. According to the audited financial statements to be presented to this synod, Cariboo's legal fees in respect of these actions totaled approximately $350,000 from 1998 until August 2, 2000 (the date of the Auditor's report).
The diocese has informed the court that it can no longer afford to be represented in the continuing legal actions.
During the opening session of the synod, Indigenous members of the diocese enacted a story "jumping off the cradle board", representing the way in which Indigenous peoples are restricted by poverty and cultural loss. The play generated a deep emotional response as all members of the synod eventually became drawn into "freeing" a young person who had been symbolically bound.
Earlier, in the opening worship, Archbishop David Crawley drew a parallel between the Diocese of Cariboo, facing possible bankruptcy, and the biblical story of the people of Israel, crossing the wilderness. "Crossing the wilderness is a common theme in the Old Testament," Archbishop Crawley said. It was in the wilderness that the people had their most direct encounters with God.
"If it is true that our church is entering a wilderness, will we also encounter God ? The answer depends on whether we make [the] same mistakes the Israelites made," Archbishop Crawley said. "If we rebuild the temple for our own purposes, and turn it into a kind of club, then we will not meet God and all our building will be in vain. But if we understand that we are going through the wilderness in order to rebuild ourselves as a place of service, a center of reconciliation, then we will meet God."
This evening the diocesan Chancellor, Bud Smith, is scheduled to give the synod an overview of its legal and financial situation. He will present three resolutions (which will be discussed beginning Saturday morning) intended to give the bishop and diocesan executive the ability to respond to changing circumstances over the next few months.
One authorizes the bishop and executive to formally wind up the affairs of the diocese during the next 12 months. Another would allow the diocese to negotiate a settlement with the Government of Canada "provided that any such proposal must be sustainable from resources within the Diocese of Cariboo or its successor and must be of direct benefit to victims of abuse at St. George's Residential School."
The third authorizes the use of an arbitration procedure between the diocese and the government to determine whether parish buildings are owned by the diocese or held in trust for the parish. Government lawyers have claimed that parish buildings are assets of the diocese and should be turned over to the government.
The Right Reverend James Cruickshank, bishop of the diocese since 1992, will give "he bishop's charge" Saturday morning. The synod continues through Saturday afternoon.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Rt. Rev. Jim Cruickshank, Bishop of Cariboo 250-376-0112; Most Rev. David Crawley, Archbishop of Kootenay and Metropolitan of British Columbia and Yukon 250-762-3306; During the Synod, Bishop Cruickshank and Archbishop Crawley may be reached care of Doug Tindal, 416-540-3653
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence); www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
St. George's Indian Residential School (Lytton, B.C.)
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo - Finance
Bankruptcy - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Third parties (Law) - Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Appeal a chance to correct doubtful decisions

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article26935
Author
Harris, David
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 December
Author
Harris, David
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1999 December
Volume
125
Issue
10
Page
4
Notes
Editorial supports the church's decision to appeal the first decision in the residential schools litigation.
Also comments on the ethics involved in the request that the church sell its shares in Talisman.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Disinvestment - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Talisman Energy Inc.
Less detail

B.C. YUKON/ANGLICAN PARISHES OF THE CENTRAL INTERIOR

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official10523
Date
2015 November 13-15
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 10-15-11 [sic i.e. 10-11-15]
Date
2015 November 13-15
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 10-15-11 [sic i.e. 10-11-15]
Mover
Canon David Jones, Chancellor
Seconder
The Very Rev. Peter Wall
Prologue
Canon David Jones brought forward a motion for the creation of the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior (APCI) with the status of a diocese, the ability to elect its own bishop and delegates to the General Synod in its own name. Resulting from this amendment,
Text
Be it resolved that
a) pursuant to Section 7 b) iii) of the Declaration of Principles consent to the decision by the Synod of the ecclesiastical Province of British Columbia and Yukon to rearrange boundaries to transfer the territory of the diocese of Cariboo to the Anglican Parishes of the central Interior, and
b) confirm that the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior has the status of a diocese, and as such is entitled to membership in the General Synod pursuant to section 8 of the constitution.
CARRIED #10-15-11 [sic i.e. 10-11-15]
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada - Dioceses - Boundaries
Anglican Church of Canada. Ecclesiastical Province of British Columbia and Yukon
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Declaration of Principles
Less detail

Cariboo bishop retires after 16 years

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article41493
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1991 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1991 March
Volume
117
Issue
3
Page
3
Notes
"Bishop John Snowden, sixth bishop of Cariboo, is retiring after more than 16 years as leader of this British Columbia diocese." "The bishop's retirement takes effect May 31 [1991]. No date has yet been chosen for the election of his successor".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Snowden, John Samuel Philip, 1928-1996
Less detail

Cariboo bishop retires after 16 years

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article6969
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1991 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
1991 March
Volume
117
Issue
3
Page
3
Notes
"Bishop John Snowden, sixth bishop of Cariboo, is retiring after more than 16 years as leader of this British Columbia diocese." "The bishop's retirement takes effect May 31 [1991]. No date has yet been chosen for the election of his successor".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Snowden, John Samuel Philip, 1928-1996
Less detail

Cariboo diocese will wind up affairs in next 12 months; arbitration may determine who owns church buildings

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7576
Date
2000 October 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
2000 October 15
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
QUESNEL, Sunday, October 15, 2000 -- Barring a miracle, the Anglican Diocese of Cariboo will pass into history sometime in the next 12 months.
Faced with crippling lawsuits brought trial by Canada's Department of Justice, the diocesan synod has approved a resolution authorizing its bishop, James Cruickshank, and its executive council to formally wind up the affairs of the diocese during the next 12 months.
It has also asked for a binding arbitration procedure to determine what assets are owned by the diocese and available for settlement of the lawsuits.
Government lawyers have argued that all church properties in the diocese are subject to seizure. But the diocesan chancellor, Bud Smith, said the diocese may hold properties in trust for the parishes, and may not have the legal authority to surrender them.
Government officials, including the Minister of Indian Affairs, Robert Nault, the Minister of Justice, Anne McLellan, and the Deputy Prime Minister, Herb Gray, have said it is not the government's intention to force any church to bankruptcy. But the Department of Justice has launched 12 of 14 legal actions currently facing the diocese, and its legal costs, more than $350,000 to date, have drained all its assets.
"The land and the buildings are the only remaining assets in the diocese," Mr. Smith told the synod, "but before we can offer any of them in settlement, we have to be clear who owns them," The diocese has proposed that the question of ownership be resolved by a process of binding arbitration, but he has not yet had a response from the government.
If it is determined that the diocese owns the buildings, Mr. Smith said, they will be turned over to the government.
A third resolution was characterized by Archbishop David Crawley, the senior bishop of the church's western region, as "a kind of faint hope clause." It authorizes the bishop and executive committee to negotiate a settlement with the government, provided that any such settlement must be sustainable from resources within the Diocese of Cariboo and "must be deemed by the bishop and the executive, in consultation with victims of abuse and survivors of St. George's Residential School, to be of direct benefit to those victims and survivors."
The Diocese of Cariboo straddles the Thompson and Fraser Rivers in interior British Columbia and runs from the small community of Spuzzum, south of Lytton, north to Prince George. Its 17 parishes include only nine that are self-supporting. Many church buildings are small and relatively poorly equipped. Relatively few have washrooms, for example. Priests are paid a basic living expense, or stipend, of approximately $27,000 a year, plus a housing allowance.
It is a point of great pride in the diocese that it has steadily increased its self-reliance over the past nine years. There was spontaneous applause when the synod heard that this year, for the first time, parishes have contributed more money to ministry beyond their borders than the diocese has received in external grants from the national Anglican Church.
But finances remain a struggle. So the members of the synod reacted first with disbelief, then with laughter, when told that a government lawyer had demanded a list of the diocese's "paintings and jewellery." Later, one of the members suggested, to general hilarity, "Maybe we should ask the Sunday school kids to do a lot of paintings and send them in."
The synod had also expected to deal with a resolution allowing clergy in the diocese to bless same-sex marriages. In view of the likely dissolution of the diocese, that motion was withdrawn. Members said it would not be responsible to take such an action when they could not be sure they would be able to follow through on it.
Instead, the synod has requested its churches to "continue to secure open and full participation and membership to all seekers," and to "respond appropriately" to the pastoral and sacramental needs of gay and lesbian persons.
In other business, the synod acted to ensure support for four meetings of the diocese's Council of Indigenous People, and support their participation at the Lytton healing gathering in July next year.
- 30 -
Indian residential schools - Anglican Church of Canada
St. George's Indian Residential School (Lytton, B.C.)
Contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence); www.anglican.ca
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo - Finance
Bankruptcy - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church buildings - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Trials, litigation, etc.
St. George's Indian Residential School (Lytton, B.C.)
Anglican Church of Canada - Residential schools
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and state - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Same sex unions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Cariboo funds redirected

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article29352
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2002 March
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2002 March
Volume
128
Issue
3
Page
7
Notes
Money previously to go to the Diocese of Cariboo will go to the Parishes of the Central Interior. Brief.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Cariboo
Anglican Church of Canada. Council of the North
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 5.