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[1966 Allocations From PWRF]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5321
Date
1967 February 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1967 February 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Famine-stricken peoples of India and Africa and earthquake victims in Turkey received a major portion of $200,724 contributed last year by Canadian Anglicans to the Primate's World Relief Fund.
Since the fund was established in 1960 a total of $1,422,358 has been disbursed through the World Council of Churches and other agencies for the alleviation of distress in the world's disaster areas.
Responding to an appeal by the Christian Council of India which has undertaken the emergency feeding of 1,000,000 persons daily, the Primate's fund made a grant of $35,000 in 1966. One phase of the council's plan involves the increasing of water supplies and another seeks to improve farming methods to prevent recurring famines.
An additional grant of $20,000 went to the Canada-Mysore project, an cooperative scheme in food technology in which the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the Canadian Hunger Foundation and India's Technological Research Institute are among the participants. The total disbursement of $62,621 in India included also $5,000 to aid rehabilitation work following the Madras cyclone and floods and $2,500 for tuberculosis control in the sub-continent.
Famine sufferers in Africa were helped to the extent of $10,000 while a similar grant was made to Turkey for housing victims of the severe earthquake in Eastern Anatolia.
Other grants included $19,000 for refugees in Kenya, Rwanda and the Sudan, while a total of $33,000 went for agricultural projects in Burma, Rhodesia, Tanzania, Tunisia, Greece, West Pakistan and Chile.
The Primate, Most Rev. Howard H. Clark, appeals to Anglicans to mark Centennial Year by making a substantial birthday gift to the world's needy people through the World Relief Fund.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief Fund (PWRF) - Grants
Disaster relief - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and development - Anglican Church of Canada
Canada - Centennial celebrations, etc. - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Less detail

Across Canada: Young Anglican chosen

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article38155
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 November
Author
Sison, Marites N.
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2012 November
Volume
138
Issue
9
Page
6
Notes
"Alexandra (Allie) Colp, 22, was chosen from more than 250 applicants to serve as a steward at the meeting of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Central Committee, Aug. 28 to Sept. 5 [2012]. She was one of two stewards from North America at the meeting of the WCC's governing body at the Orthodox Academy of Crete in Kolympari, Greece. 'Being involved in such a rich ecumenical gathering was really a great experience', said Colp, who is a parishioner at St. John's in the Wilderness Anglican Church in New Germany, N.S. The discussions underscored that differences among Christians are 'an asset rather than a limitation', said Colp, who is in her final year of an undergraduate degree in environmental biology at Guelph University in Guelph, Ont. 'That is something that will definitely stick with me', she added". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
Colp, Allie (Alexandra)
World Council of Churches. Central Committee Meeting (2012 : Kolympari, Greece)
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Ecumenical movement - 21st century
Difference (Philosophy) - Religious aspects - Christianity
Less detail

[Anglican Church of Canada Complaint Against CTV's W5]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3164
Date
1978 November 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1978 November 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto, Nov. 12, 1978
For immediate release
The trustworthiness of CTV's flagship public affairs program, W5, has been called into question in a Complaint lodged with the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) by the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada.
The Complaint concerns CTV's coverage of grants to combat racism by the World Council of Churches and the Anglican Church's contribution to those grants. The segment, entitled "A House Divided," was broadcast by W5 on October 29th.
The Complaint charges that there was a strong personal bias on the part of the reporter, Henry Champ, that critical spokesmen were unrepresentative of the views of church members and that manipulative film selection and editing techniques were used.
In a 20-page document (which included a complete transcript) signed by Archdeacon E.S. Light, General Secretary of the General Synod, the Complaint cites five major errors of fact and says the segment gave biased and distorted impressions which few in the audience would have the knowledge to challenge. It says an open, public hearing at which the videotape of the segment could be shown should be ordered by the CRTC.
"The fact that the Broadcasting Act requires the broadcasting system as a whole to provide balance in matters of public concern does not relieve the individual licencee of its obligation to approach controversial issues carefully, fairly and professionally," it states.
"If these criteria are not adhered to by each broadcaster, then the Act can do nothing to ensure for Canadians the trustworthiness of their broadcast journalism," it states.
The program segment dealt with grants made for humanitarian purposes by the Special Fund to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches to African movements, particularly to Zimbabwe Patriotic Front. It included interviews with Archbishop E.W. Scott, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and moderator of the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches, and persons critical of the grants.
The Complaint also carries the signatures of 15 other church officials from United, Presbyterian, Lutheran and Roman Catholic Churches or their organizations, supporting the contents of the brief and its request for a special public hearing.
In addition, the Anglican House of Bishops last week passed a motion unanimously supporting Archbishop Scott in his leadership of the church and in his role as moderator of the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches. It said it regrets the distortion by some media of his position on the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches.
- 30 -
For further information:
Rev. William E. Lowe
Director of Communication
Anglican Church of Canada
Office: 924-9192 ext. 252
home: 961-0000
Douglas Barrett
Turner and Barrett
Barristers and Solicitors
Office: 362-1951
home: 485-0382
Notes
Background
On October 29th, 1978, at 10 p.m., the CTV Television Network aired, on its program W5, a 13-minute segment entitled "A House Divided."
The reporter was Henry Champ; the producer, Ian McLeod.
The documentary segment dealt with contributions by the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund of the Anglican Church of Canada to the World Council of Churches' Programme to Combat Racism.
Donations to the Primate's Fund are made specifically by individuals, both directly and through their parishes, as the result of a special appeal for that purpose. Money does not come from general weekly revenues. The Fund is administered by a board comprised of clergy and laity, chaired by the Primate, Archbishop Edward Scott.
The Programme to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches receives funds for its grants directly and specifically from member churches (including the Anglican Church of Canada) and others who wish to participate in the Programme. Participation is purely voluntary. Among contributors are the governments of Sweden, Holland and Norway.
In 1978, the Special Fund of the Programme disbursed grants in the amount of $434,500 to twenty-nine agencies throughout the world, including two Canadian native groups.
The grant at issue in the W5 segment was for $85,000 for food, medicine, clothing and other humanitarian needs of over 100,000 Rhodesian refugees in camps operated by the Patriotic Front in Mozambique and Zambia. The Programme's contribution was a very small part of the multi-million dollar budget for the operation of these camps. The Programme is, in essence, a partner with other humanitarian agencies such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.
Calculated on an annual basis, less than one-quarter of one percent (approximately $2500) of the total Primate's Fund went to aid these refugees.
Subjects
Television broadcasting - Canada
Mass media - Influence
W5 (Television program)
Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Grants
Refugees - Zambia
Rhodesia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
National liberation movements
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Less detail

[Anglican Church of Canada Support of World Council of Churches]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3154
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1977 October 12
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immediate release -- October 12, 1977
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" or "liberation movements" by still others.
In an effort to clarify the situation a lengthy position paper has been prepared by the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada and some of its staff members. We enclose the full text of the paper for your information and hope you will keep it on file should there be further interest on the part of your readers or audience.
We would point out several highlights of the paper. Much misunderstanding has been created because the Anglican Church of Canada supports the World Council of Churches which, in turn, makes grants to groups such as the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO). The paper points out that any such grants do not come from General WCC funds or even from the General Relief and Development Fund.
There is, in the WCC, a special Program to Combat Racism, which has a separate fund, maintained by special contributions from individuals, groups and churches given specifically for this purpose from which grants are made. No grant is given until strict criteria are met. These criteria are meant to insure that the grants are used for humanitarian purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided releases other funds for military purposes. Since the WCC knows what much of the money is used for - support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies - they are confident that it is being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purposes, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
In its first six years, the fund for the Programme to Combat Racism received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to groups on every continent. Roughly one-half of this went to Africa. There is one interesting facet of this for concerned Canadian Anglicans. The Anglican Church of Canada has contributed $10,000 annually to this Programme. Between 1970 and 1976, the Programme to Combat Racism has made amongst its grants, these:
The Inuit (Eskimo) Tapirisat of Canada - 1971 - $2,500.00
The National Indian Brotherhood (on behalf of the Cree) - 1973-4 - $12,500.00
The Indian Brotherhood of the N.W.T. - 1973 - $7,500.00
The Committee for Original Peoples Entitlement - 1976 - $10,000.00
For further information, please contact:
Richard J. Berryman
Media Consultant
The Anglican Church of Canada
600 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2J6
(416) 924-9192 ext. 253
Notes
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA POSITION PAPER ON THE WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES PROGRAM TO COMBAT RACISM
Statements made by the Reverend Canon Burgess Carr to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Calgary in August [1977] have prompted a number of media articles, comments and reports, and individual reactions by Canadians. Canon Carr, Secretary General of the All Africa Conference of Churches, was commenting on the Churches' support of liberation movements in Africa (through the World Council of Churches) and of Christian involvement with what is called "guerrilla warfare" by some, "freedom fighters" by others, as the struggle of "indigenous native peoples for basic rights" by others and "liberation movements" by others. These groups are all involved in a struggle against "racism."
The Churches because they believe that "God has created of one blood all nations of people," and because they believe human beings are made in the image of God, and are therefore of value and worth have, particularly in the last quarter century pressed for the recognition of the need for conversations between the aggrieved majorities of Southern Africa and their minority governments. This separation has in many instances, particularly in the cases of South Africa and Rhodesia, existed in extreme form because racism has been structured into law. The clear preference of the Churches and the vast majority of those involved in a search for a change has been to seek non-violent change. But within the broadly based groups seeking change there have been and are some elements which have come to believe that the necessary changes will not come about by non-violent means, and also some individuals and groups who under extreme provocation in particular instances have resorted to violence. Such groups and actions are also to be discovered in the historical development of Britain, Canada and the U.S.A. -- in fact of virtually every country in the world.
In Africa some black groups have resorted to war always against huge odds, only when other methods of achieving change have been exhausted -- when they have seen other methods have been increasingly restricted by such actions as banning of distribution of literature, of the right to meet together, and to organize, and now more and more they are suffering personal detention and harassment. The most recent example of this is the case of Steve Biko, a prominent young leader devoted to non-violence whose death occurred during imprisonment.
Stories of brutality by liberation movements have been publicized but these can be matched and perhaps exceeded by stories of brutality involving violent oppression, torture, and death on the part of ruling governments over many years. But trading of atrocity stories accomplishes very little, if anything. Three things need to be recognized.
1. Violence does exist.
2. Violence of itself cannot create a better or more just world, and all too often violence leaders to counter violence in an ascending scale.
3. Today it is recognized that very often there is a high level of violence in many institutionalized structures, particularly in Africa.
But violence has been and is a part of history and there have been times when violence has destroyed a repressive situation and provided an opportunity to develop something new in its place. There have also been times when violence has been used to destroy hopeful conditions and to bring about oppression and exploitation. The place of violence and non-violence in social change is a complex one and one which the World Council of Churches has been studying carefully and, I believe, responsibly (see attached document).
Even as this study has been progressing, the World Council, because of the Christian call to stand on the side of the oppressed and to work for liberation, which was the ter[m] in which Jesus described his ministry:
"And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he opened the book he found the place where it was written, The Spirit of the Lord in [i.e. is] upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord. And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears." (Luke 4:17-21)
The World Council has sought to take positive action to identify with those who are struggling against racism in many parts of the world through a special program designed to combat racism. This program has three sections.
1. An administrative section with three staff members which initiates studies.
2. A program section with projects undertaken by church groups designed to combat racism as it is found in particular forms and places.
3. Grants made from a special fund which was formed by an initial grant from the WCC and maintained since then by special contributions made by individuals, groups and Churches who give money directly to this fund for its stated purposes. In its first six years the fund received and disbursed approximately $1,500,000 to organizations and groups in various parts of the world, part of whose program is designed to combat racism. Grants to such groups have been made on every continent. They are applied for, but are not given until the organizations agree to use the grants according to strict criteria as follows:
-1. The purpose of the organizations must not be inconsonant with the general purposes of the WCC and its units, and the grants are to be used for humanitarian activities (i.e. social, health and educational purposes, legal aid, etc.).
-2. The proceeds of the Fund shall be used to support organizations that combat racism, rather than welfare organizations that alleviate the effects of racism and which would normally be eligible for support from other units of the World Council of Churches.
-3. (a) The focus of grants should be on raising the level of awareness and strengthening the organizational capability of the racially oppressed people.
- (b) In addition, we recognize the need to support organizations that align themselves with the victims of racial injustice and pursue the same objectives.
4. The grants are intended as an expression of commitment by the PCR to the cause of economic, social and political justice, which these organizations promote.
5.(a) The situation in Southern Africa is recognized as a priority due to the overt and intensive nature of white racism and the increasing awareness on the part of the oppressed in their struggle for liberation.
- (b) In the selection of other areas we have taken account of those places where the struggle is most intense and where a grant might make a substantial contribution to the process of liberation, particularly where racial groups are in imminent danger of being physically or culturally exterminated.
- (c) In considering applications from organizations in countries of white and affluent majorities, we have taken not only of those where political involvement precludes help from other sources.
6. Grants should be made with due regard to where they can have the maximum effect: token grants should not be made unless there is a possibility of their eliciting a substantial response from other organizations.
The geographic area where the grants have led to much discussion is Africa. Southern Africa has received approximately one half of the grants made thus far. Here there has been no case where it was ever proven that the grants were used for military purposes. However, there are charges that the money so provided released other funds for military purposes. Since we know what much of the money is used for -- support of people in refugee camps, education of children in areas of the country where liberation groups have control, health supplies -- we are confident that they are being used for humanitarian purposes which would not, for the most part, be carried out to the same extent if grants were not made.
The tragic situation is that the focussing on these small grants made for humanitarian purposes has diverted attention from the fact that there are governments from both the "right" and the "left" who are quite prepared to provide arms when it suits their purpose, and have poured millions of dollars into military activity in Africa. This in contrast to the fact that the total amount expended by the special fund, not just in Africa but in every part of the world, would scarcely buy one tank if it had been diverted for such purposes, which is not the case.
Three things are clearly evident. One, a hopeful one, is that many people are concerned about the growing use of violence and of how the Churches should be responding to it. As long as violence exists, Churches and Church people must grapple with this reality and try to sort out how to respond to this reality with Christian insights. Christians do not share a common mind about this. The position Christians take is often greatly influenced by the context or conditions under which they live and by the alternative courses of action which are open or closed to them. As understanding of this fact grows the polarization within the Churches becomes less.
Second, certain groups seem clearly involved in opposing the program to combat racism and to focus attention upon it as a way to keep general attention away from some of the underlying causal conditions which lead to violence.
Third, to set violence and non-violence as they relate to social change, as the only two positions and in complete opposition is to ignore reality. They are better viewed as the two extremes of an arc in which there are a wide variety of shades of opinion and of action. The following Social Involvement Rating Scale helps to identify some of the modes of action open to individuals and groups within society and the Church. Studied carefully, it helps us gain a deeper understanding of a complex issue and also to identify where we stand and why.
SOCIAL INVOLVEMENT RATING SCALE
1. 'Non-involvement': Conscious avoidance of any involvement in social and political activities.
2. 'Reactive involvement': Involvement in social and political activities occurs mainly when the church is in an established position but when institutional power is threatened or influence is eroded due to social change processes. Involvement can either by [i.e. be] directly or indirectly political.
3. 'Active Personal Involvement': Involvement is positive (not reactive), but limited to personal issues not seen as related to the social structure. Action is 'non political' and is concerned with individual development and improvement of personal welfare services.
4. 'Active Social Involvement' (concensus) [i.e. consensus]: Involvement is positive, but extending beyond personal issues seeking incremental, gradual change in the social structure and attitudes by educational methods using democratic processes.
5. 'Active Involvement in Structural Change' (conflict): Involvement is characterised by greater political activism using confronting techniques to achieve incremental but more rapid evolutionary changes in social structure.
6. 'Indirect Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using non-violent techniques aimed at the peaceful overthrow of existing political and social structures.
7. 'Direct Active Involvement in Revolution': Involvement by using techniques aimed at the violent overthrow of existing oppressive political and social structures.
[Graphic showing an arc graph with labels from left to right] Non-involvement, Reactive Involvement, Active Personal Involvement, Active Social Involvement (consensus), Active Involvement in structural change (conflict), Indirect Involvement in revolution, Direct Active Involvement in revolution - Adapted from a scale developed by the Reverend Peter J. Hollingsworth, Melbourne, Australia.
Subjects
Carr, Burgess A. (Burgess Alpha), 1935-2012
All Africa Conference of Churches
Scott, Edward W. (Edward Walter), 1919-2004
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism
World Council of Churches. Programme to Combat Racism. Special Fund
Racism - Africa
Racism - Canada
Racism - South Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Christianity
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Apartheid - Religious aspects - Christianity
Apartheid - South Africa
Violence - Africa
Violence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Violence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Christianity
Christianity and politics
Less detail

The Church: Towards a Common Vision from the Anglican Church of Canada

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official10572
Date
2016 November 17-20
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-11-16
Date
2016 November 17-20
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 16-11-16
Mover
The Rt. Rev. Bruce Myers
Seconder
The Ven. Dr. Lynne McNaughton
Text
Be it resolved that this Council of General Synod receive and forward to the Faith and Order Commission, “A Response to The Church: Towards a Common Vision from the Anglican Church of Canada.”
ADOPTED #16-11-16
Subjects
Towards a Common Understanding and Vision of the World Council of Churches
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Less detail

Commitee on Ecumenical Affairs (see p.302)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3708
Date
1959 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1959 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Saskatchewan
Seconder
Mr. J.O. Elton
Text
That this Synod approve the recommendation of the Committee on Ecumenical Affairs that the quota of $35,400, proposed as the contribution of the Anglican Church of Canada towards the cost of the Headquarters' Building of the World Council of Churches in Geneva, be accepted and that this sum be included in the Budget apportionments in an amount of $6000 per annum, commencing in 1961 and continued until the objective is met in full. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches - Headquarters
Less detail

Committee on Ecumenical Affairs

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3284
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1969 August
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rt. Rev. H.R. Hunt, Suffragan Bishop of Toronto
Seconder
The General Secretary
Text
Substantive Resolutions:
1. Recognizing that the World Council of Churches at its Fourth Assembly in Uppsala, Sweden in July, 1968, and through its Division of Inter-Church Aid, Refugee and World Service and other related Divisions, is giving dynamic leadership in seeking solutions to problems facing people in a changing world; that this General Synod instruct the National Executive Council to seek ways and means to increase support and involvement of The Anglican Church of Canada in the ecumenical work of the World Council. CARRIED in both Houses.
2. Recognizing that the Canadian Council of Churches has accepted an ever increasing responsibility in developing and encouraging the ecumenical fact in Canada, and has the potential to develop into a much more effective agency for co-ordinating inter-church and community action; be it resolved that this General Synod directs the new National Executive Council to appoint, at its first meeting, a task force including executive members of Church House staff, to study the nature of the relationship of The Anglican Church of Canada to the Canadian Council of Churches and to the Ecumenical Institute, and to recommend to the November meeting of the National Executive Council specific proposals concerning financial and other support. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - Canadian Council of Churches
Canadian Council of Churches
Ecumenical Institute
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Committee on Ecumenical Affairs

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5459
Date
1966 November 17-18
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1966 November 17-18
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Canon R.R. Latimer
Seconder
Bishop of Brandon
Prologue
Canon R.R. Latimer was asked to include an item in the minutes concerning the Fourth Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Uppsala, Sweden as follows:
"The Fourth Assembly of the World Council of Churches will gather at Uppsala, Sweden, from July 4-20, 1968.
We have been allocated four places by the Central Committee according to the Constitution and Rules. In appointing our delegation we should note that Article V(i) of the Constitution reads in part as follows: 'The members of the Assembly shall be both clerical and lay persons - men and women. In order to secure that approximately one-third of the Assembly shall consist of lay persons, the Central Committee, in allocating to the member churches their places in the Assembly, shall strongly urge each church, if possible, to observe this provision.
The Fourth Assembly will be more fully representative, as an ecumenical gathering, than any of its three predecessors. This will largely result, however, from decisions taken at the Third Assembly. For the first time it will be possible for the Orthodox Churches to be fully represented. Not only will many more African churches be sending their delegates, but additional places have been specially assigned to Churches in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. At the last Assembly the International Missionary Council and the World Council of Churches became one body; this will therefore be the first Assembly at which the results of integration can be made fully manifest. At Uppsala there will be between 780 and 800 full delegates. Advisers and consultants are to number 165, youth delegates 150, fraternal delegates 85, observers 65, and special guests 65. This makes a grand total of over 1,300. In addition, a number of staff with various responsibilities will be present and it is anticipated that accredited members of the press will add a maximum of 750 more persons.
The Assembly will be outward-looking to the world, aware of the tremendous challenge of many different kinds of radical change today. But in its worship and and its deliberation, it will seek, not only to be creatively alive to contemporary thought and needs, but above all to open itself and the life of the churches to the renewing forces of the Holy Spirit.
The main theme will be 'BEHOLD I MAKE ALL THINGS NEW.' This great promise from The Book of Revelation will be studied with due care for its full Biblical context. The constant renewal of the Church is to be seen in the light of God's purpose for the world. The 'new creation' in Christ must be understood in relation to God's ultimate renewal of all things. The key concept will be the renewing quality of life experienced here and now when man sets his face towards the goal to which God's plans unfold. Human innovation has to be distinguished from the new order which is God's gift alone.
Sections: The Uppsala Assembly will be divided into six Sections, as follows:
I. The Church's Unity in a Shrinking World
II. The Church in Mission
III. The Churches' Role in Social Change
IV. The Churches' Role in International Affairs
V. The Worship of God in a Secular Age
VI. Towards a New Style of Living
A popular and well-illustrated booklet, rather shorter and simpler than prepared before the New Delhi Assembly, will be available early in 1967. This will contain an account of the significance and function of a WCC Assembly, seven brief Bible studies on the Assembly Theme, and an introduction to the work of each of the six Sections. This will be followed by a report volume, covering the period between the Third and Fourth Assemblies, and a work book containing the documents to go to the Sections, as well as material for use of the Committees.
Cost: All accommodation in Uppsala will be on an equal level and everybody will be able to live in single rooms. The cost for full accommodation, room boards and service, will be approximately $10 a day per person. In addition, there will be a charge of $30, the registration fee to the Assembly. This indicates that the amount per delegate for participation in the Fourth Assembly will be approximately US$200."
In connection with the allocation of four Anglican places at the Assembly, the Committee on Ecumenical Affairs has passed the following motion:
That a committee, consisting of the Rt. Rev. E.S. Reed, the Rt. Rev. H.R. Hunt and Canon R.R. Latimer, in consultation with the Primate, should bring in nominations for the representatives of the Canadian Church (including the observers) to the Fourth Assembly of the W.C.C. for our next meeting in February, for subsequent submission to the National Executive Council. CARRIED
Text
That the report be received. CARRIED
Subjects
World Council of Churches. Assembly (4th : 1968 : Uppsala, Sweden)
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
Representation on committees - Anglican Church of Canada
Representation on committees - World Council of Churches
Less detail

Committee on Ecumenical Affairs (See p. 302.)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9936
Date
1959 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
[Act 96]
Resolution
Date
1959 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
[Act 96]
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Saskatchewan
Seconder
Mr. J.O. Elton
Text
That this Synod approve the recommendation of the Committee on Ecumenical Affairs that the quota of $35,400, proposed as the contribution of The Anglican Church of Canada towards the cost of the Headquarters' Building of the World Council of Churches in Geneva, be accepted and that this sum be included in the Budget apportionments in an amount of $6000 per annum, commencing in 1961 and continued until the objective is met in full. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
[Act 96 of 1959 General Synod. See page 87.]
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches - Headquarters
Less detail

Committee on Ecumenical Affairs (see page 312)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3490
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Ottawa
Seconder
Canon R.R. Latimer
Text
That the document relating to the future financing of the World Council of Churches, referred to the sub-committee on budget, when appointed, merits careful consideration and positive response as evidence of the continued commitment of The Anglican Church of Canada to the ecumenical movement and fully responsible participation in its program by our Communion. CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches - Finance
Less detail

30 records – page 1 of 3.