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Agricultural Crisis

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official493
Date
1986 June 14-22
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 73
Date
1986 June 14-22
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 73
Mover
Ven. F. Stewart
Seconder
Mr. M. Archambault
Text
That this General Synod:
1. recognizing the agricultural crisis as a major social problem; expresses its concern at the stress and suffering of farming families caught in the economic crisis in Canada's agricultural sector;
2. directs the Program Committee to take steps to explore the roots of the agricultural crisis, and to recommend practical ways for the Church, at parish, diocesan and national levels, to minister to those under stress, and to advocate helpful changes in national policies. CARRIED IN ALL ORDERS Act 73
Subjects
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and agriculture - Anglican Church of Canada
Farm life - Canada
Farmers - Canada
Farmers - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Canada
Less detail

Christian farmers decry "suicide gene" in seeds

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article25662
Author
O'Leary, Denyse, 1950-
Journal
Faith Today
Date
1999 March - April
Author
O'Leary, Denyse, 1950-
Journal
Faith Today
Date
1999 March - April
Volume
17
Issue
2
Page
10
Notes
Biotech firms, anxious to prevent farmers from simply saving successful seeds and planting them again, are trying to breed a gene into the seeds they sell that kills the second generation.
Subjects
Biotechnology - Religious aspects - Christianity
Agriculture - Canada
Seeds
Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario
Corporate social responsibility
Less detail

Commission on Rural Work

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6183
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Athabasca
Seconder
Rev. R.F. Palmer
Prologue
The resolution of the Rural Deaneries of Peace River and Grande Prairie suggesting a Commission on Rural Work was presented by the Bishop of Athabasca.
"The Rural Deanery of Peace River along with representatives of the Rural Deanery of Grande Prairie in the Diocese of Athabasca respectively suggest and request that the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada meeting in Toronto in September 1943 should appoint a Commission on Rural Church Work in Canada with special reference to the Church of England.
1. We would humbly suggest that this Commission should consist of three Bishops, three Priests and three laymen to be appointed by the General Synod in session this Fall, with power given to this Commission to increase its numbers by additional members, the same to be approved by the Primate. The Primate and the Secretaries of the three Boards of the General Synod would be ex officio members of this commission.
2. This Commission should give immediate attention to the formulation of plans for a survey of Rural Life and rural conditions in Canada with special reference to the ministrations of our Church in these rural areas, including the problem of education in rural areas, the important matter of the use of leisure in these areas, the home life, opportunities for advanced training of talented and ambitious young people, the stipends of the Clergy, the condition of the Rectories in which they live, the problem of transportation as they serve their people, the special training of clergy for rural work, etc, etc.
3. This Commission should examine carefully the great and important problem which deals with the place of the farm in our economic life, the financial returns for the labours of the farmer, the conditions under which he lives, etc, etc. This is one of the most important problems facing Canadian life today.
4. This Commission should have the power to co-operate with other Christian bodies within the boundaries of the Dominion as they study these and kindred problems.
5. Other nations and other parts of our Empire throughout the Church have given and are giving special attention to this vast and extremely important subject. Our Sister Church in the United States held its first Rural Church Conference in 1923. In 1924 a Division of Rural Work of the National Council was organized and a full-time secretary of Rural Work appointed. A special publication was issued regularly - The Rural Messenger. In 1925 the General Convention of the Episcopal Church appointed standing Committees on Rural Work. In 1928 a Joint Committee on Rural Work was appointed and in 1931, it gave a printed report which is a most valuable document.
In the USA the National Roman Catholic Rural Life Conference has been held annually for twenty years and this Church is giving very special attention to this Ecclesiastical and National problem.
In England at the beginning of this year of 1943, the Church of England along with other Church bodies has instituted a Rural Reconstruction Inquiry. This movement was inspired by the Oxford and Edinburgh Conferences. It is undertaken because the Council believes that all attempts at the social reconstruction of England will be finally void without a revival of the life of the countryside. This involves an awakening of interest among country folk in the needs of the family, the problems of industry, the claims of culture and the place of religion.
The ultimate purposes of the effort are said to be two: first, to secure that as much thought and energy are applied to the problems of villages as to those of towns; secondly, to "aid the Churches to relate their message and activities more closely to the needs and opportunities of rural communities."
Text
That the Resolution be received and considered clause by clause. CARRIED in both Houses.
1st Clause was amended by adding "and three women" after "laymen."
Clause 1 - CARRIED in both Houses as amended.
Clauses 2 and 3 - CARRIED in both Houses.
Clauses 3 and 4 - CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Commission on Rural Work
Rural churches - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Farmers - Canada
Farmers - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and agriculture - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

The Country Church and the Rural Problem

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article469
Author
Wright, George Gillespie, d. 1944
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 April
Author
Wright, George Gillespie, d. 1944
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1919 April
Issue
23
Page
1-16 p.
Notes
Contents: The Country Church and the Rural Problem / By the Rev. G.G. Wright, Rector of Navan, Ont.
"The years of warfare have served to place the importance of agriculture before the people of Canada with a clearness which a decade of writing on the subject could not have produced. .... The war has brought to people's attention the fact that the development of agriculture is fundamental to the national life, and that, for reasons which shall be noted later, the well-being of the farmer -- industrially, economically, socially, and in the religious sphere has a direct bearing on the development of every branch of the national life. The solution then of the rural problem is not a question which concerns only or even chiefly that part of the country but is of interest to everyone who has at heart the national well-being (p. 2)".
Contents divided into sub-sections: Rural Depletion -- Wherein Then Lies the Solution -- Woman's Work -- Social Life -- The Church and the Problem.
Subjects
Rural areas - Canada
Rural areas - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Economic aspects - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church work with farmers - Anglican Church of Canada
Farm life - Canada
Canada - Rural conditions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Rural churches - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

The crisis of older rural women : Support groups can help people to help each other

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article9072
Author
Miller, Ollie
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
PMC (Practical Ministry in Canada)
Date
1991 January
Author
Miller, Ollie
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
PMC (Practical Ministry in Canada)
Date
1991 January
Volume
7
Issue
5
Page
4-5
Notes
With sensitive leadership and training, the people of God--in the form of older rural women--can perform a ministry to the farm crisis.
Subjects
Rural women - Canada
Church work with farmers - Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects
Less detail

From corporate greed to common good : Canadian churches and community economic development

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/catalog3215
Publication Date
c1998
Material Type
Book
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Call Number
BR 115 E3 F76 1998
Place
[Toronto ON]
Publisher
Novalis
Publication Date
c1998
Physical_Description
viii, 151 p. ; 22.8 x 15 cm.
Material Type
Book
Notes
"Edited by Murray MacAdam with John Bird and Kevin Arsenault".
Includes list of "Resources", pp. [147]-151.
"The stories told in this book are true stories about people who refuse to separate economics from community. From loving one's neighbour as oneself. And from caring about the earth under one's feet. These days, the movement supported by people who want to build a neighbourly economy is often called 'community economic development'. (The same idea gets different names at different moments; in my father's youth, it was called 'the co-operative movement'.)" Intro. p. 3-4.
Contents : Contributors -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction / Janet Somerville -- Community Economic Development in Canada: Band-Aid or Breakthrough ? / Murray MacAdam -- Babylon Revisited: CED [Community Economic Development] and the Economic Injustice of Our Times / Kevin Arsenault -- New Dawn: The Cape Breton Giant / John Bird -- Edmonton Recycling Society: Mixing a Mission with Bottom-line Success / John Bird -- Getting the Church Onside: Riverdale Economic Ministry / Murray MacAdam -- Kagiwiosa Manomin: A First Nation CED Project / John Bird -- Up and Over the Money Wall / Murray MacAdam -- Mondragon: Ideas with Legs / Greg MacLeod / Fair Shares for Farmers: Community-Shared Agriculture / Edward M. Bennett and Dianne Heise -- An Advent Reflection from a Fair-Share Family . Laura Reilly -- Growing the Community Economy / Murray MacAdam -- Afterword / Cynthia Patterson -- Resources.
Added Entry
MacAdam, Murray
Arsenault, Kevin
Bird, John, 1953-
Bennett, Edward M.
Heise, Dianne
MacLeod, Greg
Patterson, Cynthia, 1955-
Reilly, Laura
Somerville, Janet, 1938-
Subjects
Community economic development - Religious aspects - Christianity
Economic development projects - Canada
Economic justice - Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Christianity
Economic justice - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic justice - Religious aspects - United Church of Canada
Economics - Canada
Economics - Religious aspects - Christianity
Agriculture - Canada
Christianity and agriculture - Canada
Money - Religious aspects - Christianity
ISBN
2-89088-844-4
Call Number
BR 115 E3 F76 1998
Location
U. of T. Libraries
Less detail

Growing food, caring for creation

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39745
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 February
Author
Williams, Leigh Anne
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2015 February
Volume
141
Issue
2
Page
3
Notes
"Jeremie Clyde has a passion for food -- for growing it in a way that is healthy for the people who eat it, for the planet and for a just sharing of God-given bounty". "When they were parishioners at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, the couple began a community garden. From their stall at the farmers' market, they had seen the potential of a space behind the church, which had a great southern exposure. With the parish's support, they designed some senior-friendly plots. 'Most of them had gardened all their lives, but they couldn't garden where they're living now, or couldn't garden unassisted', said Clyde". "Clyde has also given gardening workshops at various Calgary churches. He encourages people to treat gardening as a devotional activity, to look for revelations of God. He recently travelled to the Sorrento Centre in B.C. to make a presentation on sustainable agriculture at a food security conference organized by the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF)". "Although the Clyde family still lives in Calgary, they farm 160 acres near Sundrie, Alta. Clyde said he has seen worrying signs of climate change on his farm -- such as weeds and insects expanding into new territory. ... Clyde invited Bishop Greg Kerr-Wilson of the diocese of Calgary to talk about the issue while helping harvest the organic rye. With the Rev. Mishka Lysack, an Anglican priest devoted to environmental issues, they decided to start building an ecumenical group focused both on the theology of creation care and current issues". "The Clydes donate about a tenth of their harvest -- several hundred pounds of fresh produce -- to the local food bank each year, and they have also had some low-income families help on the farm at times".
Subjects
Clyde, Jeremie
St. Barnabas Anglican Church (Calgary, Alta.)
Food - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Gardens - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Climatic changes - Canada
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Lysack, Mishka (Michael David), 1954-
Less detail

Migrant Workers' Outreach Ministry

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article39766
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Foundation Update [Anglican Foundation of Canada]
Date
2016 June
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Foundation Update [Anglican Foundation of Canada]
Date
2016 June
Issue
32
Page
[1]
Notes
"St. Alban's, Beamsville, ON, Diocese of Niagara. This innovative program supports farm workers in the fruit-growing area of Niagara, providing Sunday evening worship in Spanish, dinner, and appointments with medical staff and taxation advisors. Bicycles, an Internet café, and ESL [English as a Second Language] instruction are also provided". [Text of entire article.]
Subjects
St. Alban's Anglican Church (Beamsville, Ont.)
Church work with migrant labor - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Foundation of Canada - Grants
Less detail

Mushrooming questions about plant-breeders rights: Church seeks white paper, public hearings, cites danger to farming through cost increases

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1912
Date
1988 June 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1988 June 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
TORONTO, June 10, 1988 -- Legislation now before the House of Commons raises serious ethical issues and could impose extra hardship on Canadian farmers, the Anglican Church of Canada says.
Bill C-107, an act to establish "plant-breeders rights", has received first reading in the House. The church says there should be public hearings across Canada before the bill receives second reading.
In a letter to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, the Church's general secretary lists several concerns about the legislation which would allow corporations to take out patents on plants. David Woeller says this raises important ethical questions: "Something as basic to the future of all human beings as food must be seen in a context broader than that of individual or corporate property rights and must not be decided only by plant scientists and big business."
The letter notes that this is the first time Parliament has addressed the concept of "patenting" life forms. It says once any kind of life form -- even plant life -- becomes established as a commodity to be bought and sold, it will become extremely difficult to draw the line: "The United States began with plant patenting but has moved to allow patenting for micro-organisms and animals.
"Earlier this year Harvard University was granted a patent for a mouse containing human genes ..... There is no difference between human genetic material and the genetic material of any other species."
The letter raises three additional concerns:
First it says "Bill C-107 is addressing the wrong issue". The real issue is to ensure adequate funds for agricultural research. It suggests this should be done through public funding, rather than through increasing profits to agricultural companies. It says there should be a white paper on the future of agricultural research to allow Canadians to consider this issue in its broader context.
Second, the evidence suggests that "agricultural input costs will increase substantially" as a result of the legislation".
-- there will be an immediate increase in seed costs of 10 percent, according to an estimate by the Manitoba department of agriculture;
-- several estimates predict a further rapid rise in prices, by at least 30 percent;
-- the example of pharmaceutical companies causes special concern. These companies recently received similar patent protection for prescription drugs. At that time, the federal government said price increases would not exceed the Consumer Price Index (about 5 percent). In fact, a study by the government of Ontario revealed that more than 1,000 drugs had excessive price increases over a six month period -- and some increased by more than 100 percent ! Many of the pharmaceutical companies responsible for these price increases are the same companies which seek patents on their seeds.
Third, the bill would operate to the detriment of Third World agriculture which has supplied us with much of our "germplasm" -- the genetic material of plant breeding -- free of charge. Bill C-107 flies in the face of United Nations initiatives to ensure "farmers' rights".
The letter concludes by urging the government to initiate public hearings to be held across the country before proceeding with the legislation.
-30-
For further information, contact:
Peter Hamel, National Affairs Consultant, or
David Pollock, Economic Justice Consultant,
(416) 924-9192
or Doug Tindal, Director of Communications
(416) 924-9192; residence (416) 335-8349
Subjects
Patents - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Food supply
Food supply - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Plants, Protection of
Biotechnology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agricultural biotechnology - Canada
Agricultural biotechnology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Resolutions [Plant Breeders' Rights]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official734
Date
May 1988
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
May 1988
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Mrs. A. Newell
Seconder
Mrs. H. Woolley
Text
That the National Executive Council convey to the Government of Canada its concerns with respect to Bill C-107 regarding Plant Breeders' Rights and in particular the following concerns:
1. That a wide genetic diversity of plant stock be preserved and their availability maintained.
2. That plant breeding research and development not ignore those crops designed for relatively small markets or for regions with specific needs.
3. That the present level of funding for public research and development be increased.
4. That royalties received from publicly produced cultivar be returned to support the plant breeding program that developed the variety.
5. That the free exchange of research information be increased.
6. That excessive price increases for seeds and plant stock be avoided and that the financial needs and constraints of Canadian farmers and consumers be considered, should any increase in cost occur.
7. That government maintain a responsible presence and control over research and pricing.
8. That the 18 year patent period be reassessed and decreased.
9. That the full implications of patenting life forms be explored in depth and the ethical and legal questions addressed in greater detail.
10. That the question of ownership vis-a-vis the concentration of productive power of food resources be squarely addressed and the ethical and geo-political implications responsibly explored.
11. That efforts be made to develop new plant stocks that are less dependent upon agro-chemicals.
12. That the well-being of the natural environment be a major consideration in granting patents to any new seed stock.
13. That the needs of the Third World, in terms of food production and agricultural practices compatible to ecological and economic conditions, be responsibly considered.
14. That the issue of possible conflict of interest of patent holders be addressed. (In many cases, the same key international companies are involved in the debate over generic drugs, generic pesticides and plant breeding legislation. The question to be addressed is how appropriate is it for the same company to hold a patent on a given seed stock that requires the application of an agro-chemical patented by that company.)
15. That in granting patents for new foods stocks where possible nutritional content takes precedence over such factors as uniformity of size, ripening time, colour, etc., that is over factors that have more to do with aesthetics, convenience and efficiency than with nutrition.
16. That public and open hearings begin as soon as possible so that all sides of the debate may be heard and that the ethical, ecological, political and commercial implications of such a Bill can be more fully explored before any final action is taken.
Following lengthy discussion, it was the consensus that the above motion should be referred and it was:
That the above motion regarding Plant Breeders' Rights be referred to the Executive Director of Program, for staff work as appropriate noting the need for urgency. CARRIED #53-05-88
Subjects
Patents - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Food supply
Food supply - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Plants, Protection of
Biotechnology - Moral and ethical aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agricultural biotechnology - Canada
Agricultural biotechnology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.