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[26th General Synod Meeting in Regina]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5138
Date
1973 April 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1973 April 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
The general synod of the Anglican Church of Canada meets next month at a time, in the words of its leaders, when values and issues are changing rapidly and the "very possibility of `faith' as a credible stance of life has been questioned."
The comment of the long-range planning committee in its introductions to reports to the 26th synod, meeting in Regina May 3-11, is underlined by Archbishop Edward W. Scott, primate of the church.
In a report prepared for the assembly he says if Anglicans are to respond to the demanding issues before them and to give leadership in complex situations they will need, among other things, "a greater sensitivity to the leading of the Holy Spirit" and to display "greater willingness to make hard decisions." He may expand upon this when he officially opens the assembly in St. Paul's Cathedral May 3.
About 290 members of synod, clerical and lay, from the 28 dioceses of the church will attend the sessions in Regina's Hotel Saskatchewan.
Four main topics or themes have been set out for discussion: quality of life and community, of faith, of ministry and of the church. The themes provide opportunity for debate and decision on a wide range of social problems disturbing the church and the country in the 1970s.
A preamble, prepared by Dean Herbert O'Driscoll, to a report of the long-range planning committee says:
"To some extent it could be said that the criteria of faith in previous decades were quantitative. The strength of the church tended to be judged by quantities (that is, activities, budget) and faith tended to be seen in terms of private piety and attendance at worship...
Such categories have been found, not so much to be discredited, but to be inadequate...Between us and the comparative innocence of the late '50s too much has been said, too many paperbacks written, too many tides of opinion have flowed for everything to remain as it was.
In the 1970s the many options of a plural society vary from actual alternatives to the Christian faith to a whole spectrum of attitude and styles within the Christian faith itself...
Faith is no longer a piece of familiar furniture placed securely in the living room of the mind."
The committee says further, in another report on the quality of life and community, that the rate of change in the world "continues to be a major factor in challenging individuals and institutions to be flexible."
The free-wheeling tone of the committee's observations may typify the free and frank discussion expected at this synod with members participating more fully than in the past.
Six sessions - totalling 13 hours - have been scheduled for group discussion. Each session will bear upon a particular issue. Resolutions formulated by these groups will be correlated and sent to plenary sessions for decision and policy direction. Committee reports and resolutions go directly to the plenary meetings.
The synod meets every two years. Its last meeting was in Niagara Falls, Ont., in February, 1971, when some of its sessions were held jointly with those of the general council of the United Church of Canada which also meets biennially.
It was the first time in the history of Canada's largest Protestant denominations that their highest courts had met together.
Negotiations for organic union of the churches have been under way for more than a quarter-century but no definitive move on union will be taken at this synod.
Members of synod are the 55 bishops from the four ecclesiastical provinces of Canada (Quebec and the Atlantic provinces), Ontario, Rupert's Land and British Columbia and clergy and laity chosen by the dioceses with a youth delegation of 15.
At least 25 women, seven of them from the youth delegation, are among the lay members along with eight observers from Anglican Church Women who participate in discussions but do not vote.
Among controversial topics before the synod will be that of abortion and here the views of the women are expected to be expressed freely.
A strong bloc of women commissioners forced the abortion issue to the floor of the general council of the United Church two years ago when that church went on record as accepting abortion in certain social, economic and therapeutic circumstances. The United Church is the only Christian church to take such a stand but it does not support abortion on demand.
The Anglican Church opposes abortion and one of the questions to be posed at this synod by one committee, the task force on human life, is: "What does it mean to be human if the foetus can be aborted?"
Other questions also are posed by the task force in its report on human life and community:
"Who am I if bodily organs can be transplanted?"
"What quality of life are people living in our cities?"
"Why should anyone go to the moon when there are vast needs and agonies on the earth?"
- 30 -
For more information contact:
Michael O'Meara, Director
Division of Communications
924-9192
or
Shelagh Kendal
Press Officer
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (26th : 1973 : Regina, Sask.)
Anglican Church of Canada - 20th century
Christianity and culture - Anglican Church of Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - United Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church and social problems - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Long Range Planning Committee
Religion - Canada - 20th century
Less detail
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 2-2-88
Resolution 3-2-88
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 2-2-88
Resolution 3-2-88
Mover
Bishop Ferris
Seconder
Bishop Wood
Prologue
Moved by: Bishop Brown
Seconded by: Bishop Payne
That in view of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision with regard to abortion law, we ask the Primate to appoint a small Task Force to review the Church's position on the abortion issue and to report its recommendations to the May meeting of the National Executive Council, and to the October meeting of the House of Bishops.
Amendment
Text
That the words "to appoint a small task force to review the church's position on the abortion issue" be deleted and the following inserted in their place, "to appoint a small task force to study what action needs to be taken to uphold our Church's stand on abortion in relation to changes in the abortion law".
The motion, as amended, was put and CARRIED.
The motion, as amended, is as follows:
That, in view of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision with regard to the abortion law, we ask the Primate to appoint a small task force to study what action needs to be taken to uphold our Church's stand on abortion in relation to changes in the abortion law, and to report its recommendations to the May meeting of the National Executive Council, and to the October meeting of the House of Bishops.
Subjects
Abortion - Law and legislation - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Abortion
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1988 May
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution #65-05-88
Date
1988 May
Source
National Executive Council. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution #65-05-88
Mover
Ven D.J. Woeller
Seconder
Dean B. Stavert
Prologue
In response to a request from the House of Bishops (February 1988), the Primate reported he had invited Mrs. P. Creighton, Mrs. D. Marshall and Dr. J. Reed to form a Task Force to prepare a contemporary statement regarding abortion.
It was agreed that we, as Christians, must work towards the creation of a society in which every human being is welcome and recognized that we must both work for change of legislation which affects social programming.
Chancellor David Wright stated that difficulties outside the Criminal Code fall within the jurisdiction of the provinces and the federal government can enter the field only through the Criminal Code, but can control processes through funding.
Text
That this National Executive Council:
1. express its heartfelt thanks to the members of the Task Force on Abortion;
2. endorses the report of the Task Force;
3. refers the report to the Primate for appropriate action. CARRIED #65-05-88
Notes
It was agreed that the Primate should send the report to appropriate people in the life of the church and the country.
The Primate, on behalf of the NEC, expressed thanks to Mrs. Creighton, Mrs. Marshall and Dr. Reed for their report.
Subjects
Abortion - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1972 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto hospitals are performing abortions "without restriction," according to a prominent official of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Rev. Arthur Brown, rector of a large Toronto parish and a member of the National Executive Council of General Synod made the charge in connection with deliberations on a forthcoming report by a Task Force on Human Life.
The report is not expected to be completed until the end of 1973 and Father Brown said he and other pastors are impatiently awaiting it for guidance on new and complex moral situations.
He told bishops and other delegates from across Canada to the executive council that "all kinds of girls are going through our hospitals in metropolitan Toronto being aborted of pregnancies." His information, he said, comes from nurses and other hospital staff.
Father Brown claimed that staffs in some Toronto hospitals are aborting without restriction "under the guise of it being good for the total health of the mother."
Five years ago, he said, one Toronto hospital listed 28 abortions. Last year, the number was over 300, "ten times as many, or more."
He said "doctors are compromised by the destruction of human life" in this abortion situation. On becoming doctors, he said, they swear an oath to preserve life but due to the present situation "they are placed in a major compromised situation."
Father Brown said nursing staffs are upset over having to clean up after induced miscarriages and they come to him for guidance.
Archbishop E.W. Scott, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada expressed deep sympathy towards the position described by Father Brown but said the task force's report will take another year due to the complexities of the issues involved.
"It's becoming obvious that people are feeling a need for help in making decisions in these areas," Archbishop Scott said.
"Each case has to be evaluated in terms of the health of the mother and the possible health of the child, and not only on the question of the sanctity of life but also in the area of the quality of life."
Archbishop Scott emphasized that hospital boards deciding abortion cases should include persons representing moral issues as well as medical issues.
Besides abortion, the task force is studying the whole concept of when life begins and ends in relation to euthanasia, transplants, biological engineering and the vast implications of discoveries in biochemistry. Archbishop Scott said the study has become increasingly complex as it delves into the legal, medical, moral and social aspects of life. The task force is composed of lawyers, doctors, research scientists, housewives, social workers, theologians and others. It is also consulting with similarly concerned groups in the United States, Britain and other parts of the world.
A progress report will be presented to the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada at its biennial meeting next May in Regina.
- 30 -
For further information, contact:
Michael O'Meara
Director, Communications Division
924-9192 (Business)
742-8327 (Residence)
Subjects
Abortion - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Human Life
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Medical ethics - Canada
Chaplains, Hospital - Anglican Church of Canada
Brown, Arthur D. (Arthur Durrant), 1926-2011
Less detail
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-88
Date
1988 February 8-12
Source
House of Bishops. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 1-2-88
Mover
Bishop Brown
Seconder
Bishop Payne
Prologue
Bishop Payne asked if, in the light of recently adopted federal government legislation, this House should make a public statement.
Text
That the Primate be requested to consider this matter and call together a small group of people to prepare a contemporary statement regarding abortion. CARRIED
Subjects
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Abortion
Anglican Church of Canada - Pastoral letters and charges
Less detail
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1967 August 22-31
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Dr. D.J. Broadwell
Seconder
Canon J.G. Lethbridge
Text
That Resolution G, page 133 of the Convening Circular, be amended to read as follows:
"Whereas there are legislative changes contemplated in Canada in relation to abortion,
Whereas there is a need for a comprehensive study into matters relating to abortion, and
Whereas there has been no definite statement made by the Anglican Church of Canada regarding abortion,
THIS GENERAL SYNOD
1. Requests the Primate to set up a special study committee of theologians, parish clergy, obstetricians, doctors engaged in family practice, lawyers, and specialists in behavioural and medical sciences to prepare a statement on all aspects relating to abortion, and further
2. Authorizes the said committee to submit a brief in the name of the Anglican Church of Canada when opportunity is provided to do so by the Government of Canada." CARRIED in both Houses.
Subjects
Abortion - Law and legislation - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Church affirms its position on abortion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7233
Date
1989 November 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1989 November 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
NEWS RELEASE
Friday November 3, 1989
12:00 noon [Toronto, Ont.]
In the light of the Government's announcement of a new Abortion Bill, the Anglican Church reaffirms its position that both the rights and needs of women, and the rights and needs of the unborn, require protection.
The Church welcomes a non-gestational approach. This accords with the Church's opposition to any arbitrary division which would make early abortion available on demand. The Church's fundamental position is that "abortion is always the taking of human life and, in our view, should never be done except for serious therapeutic reasons". However, the Church's Abortion report affirms that:
-an upper limit should be established at which "there is no reasonable prospect of viability"
- there should be a waiting period during which time counselling to women should be made available
- other alternatives to abortion explored including "social and financial supports to meet the needs of the woman, in housing accommodation, child care, employment, retraining, welfare benefits, and income support, as well as consideration of adoption of the baby expected."
The Church further affirms that there should be a conscience clause, so that "the conscientious right of health care personnel to refrain from participating in abortion procedures be guaranteed."
The Church also is "opposed in principle" to "anticipated genetic defect in the foetus as automatic grounds for abortion", because as Christians we are "called to be the voice of the voiceless and powerless (and) must speak out when those different from or less able than the norm are to be denied the full rights accorded their fellow humans".
The Church's Abortion Report also recommends legislation to "ban commercial transactions in human genetic material"; or any possibility of deliberate abortion for purposes of "foetal cell farming" for human transplants, and welcomes the recent announcement of a Royal Commission on reproductive techniques "as a vehicle to examine these concerns and develop legislative measures".
The Anglican Church sees abortion as a public justice issue, challenging Canadians to build a society that affirms human life, which values children and welcomes a new generation, and which provides legal and social protection for women caught in the trauma of problem pregnancies. Such extensive social legislation, to reduce conditions which make the choice of abortion more likely, would include:
- programs and education to combat violence against women
- more affordable housing
- pay equity for women
- a guaranteed annual income, and other financial measures
- universally accessible, publicly funded day care
- an intensified national program to collect child support payments from delinquent fathers
- better educational programs about sexuality and contraception in schools
The Church does not see abortion as simply a "woman's issue" but rather a community issue, which takes place on the battleground of women's bodies. Concerned that women are frequently forced to choose between marginalization and poverty or abortion, the Church believes that in many circumstances women are not "free" to choose to bear their children and so, because society fails to provide supportive structures, "abortion has become a means of `restructuring the woman' by emptying the womb". Many Canadian women who choose not to bear their child make their decision out of alienation and hopelessness. "True choice must involve alternatives to despair" the Report concludes.
Abortion In a New Perspective: Report of the Task Force on Abortion, is available from: The Anglican Book Centre, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2J6
For further information contact: The Reverend Michael Ingham, Principal Secretary to the Primate, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario, (416) 924-9192; Mrs. Diane Marshall (Family therapist, Report co-author) (416) 487-3613; Mrs. Phyllis Creighton (Research historian, Report co-author) (416) 978-2245
Subjects
Abortion - Law and legislation - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Disabled - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Sexual ethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc. - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Reproductive technology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Human embryo - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Human reproductive technology - Law and legislation - Canada
Human reproductive technology - Moral and ethical aspects
Medical ethics - Canada
Women's rights - Canada
Birth control - Canada
Birth control - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Contraception - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poor women - Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Church responds to abortion legislation

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9060
Date
1989 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1989 November 10
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
NEWS RELEASE
Friday November 10, 1989
1:00 pm [Toronto, Ont.]
The Anglican Church of Canada welcomes -- with some reservations -- the federal government's initiative in bringing forward legislation to regulate abortion in Canada. While there are important areas of concern which the Bill does not address, we would give cautious support to its provisions, as far as they go, and we express the hope that it will be open to amendment in the parliamentary process.
The Anglican Church is pleased the Bill is not based on a gestational approach, which devalues the unborn in the early stages of development. A non-gestational approach accords with the Church's opposition to any arbitrary division which would make early abortion available on demand. The Church's fundamental position is that "abortion is always the taking of a human life and, in our view, should never be done except for serious therapeutic reasons".
We think it right to try to establish a balance between the legitimate rights of women and the state's interest in the foetus.
We think it right to distinguish between contraception and abortion.
However, we question a number of matters in the legislation itself, and would raise some issues that are not included in the Bill; namely:
- we are dismayed that it includes criminal sanctions against women
- we question whether the measure will actually protect the foetus. The Bill allows its life to be taken if one physician agrees that a woman's physical, mental, or psychological health would be likely to be threatened if the pregnancy continues. The Anglican Church, in its resolutions, accepts abortion as a therapeutic measure where pregnancy endangers a woman's life or physical or mental health. But the language of "threat" provides not clear standard. Will a serious threat be required -- a balancing of rights -- or will a minor one do ? Neither the woman's rights not the foetal rights are clear.
- we would prefer the legislation to require a second and independent medical opinion
- we would prefer to see a mandatory waiting period during which counselling to women should be made available ensuring that alternatives to abortion can be explored, including social and financial supports to meet the needs of the woman, in housing accommodation, child care, employment, retraining, welfare benefits, and income support, as well as consideration of adoption of the baby expected.
- we regret there appears to be no provision for recording the reasons for which abortion is undertaken. How will legislators learn what needs to be done to remedy the conditions leading to abortion ?
- we regret there is no conscience clause protecting health care workers who do not wish to participate in abortion procedures
- we would prefer to see provisions in this, or some accompanying legislation, which would guarantee equitable access across the country to both abortion and counselling services
- we do not believe the legislation addresses the root causes of the number of abortions in Canada
Too often, women face the choice between abortion and poverty. If this is to be changed, and the number of abortions diminished, women need to be given realistic alternatives.
"True" choice will only be possible when there exists:
- adequate social and economic support structures to enable women to have their children
- programs and education to combat violence against women
- more affordable housing
- pay equity for women
- a guaranteed annual income, and other financial measures
- universally accessible, publicly funded day care
- an intensified national program to collect child support payments from delinquent fathers
- better educational programs about sexuality and contraception in schools
The Anglican Church wants to see the social context and the need for support for women to be taken seriously. This legislation puts all the responsibility on the woman herself, and on her physician. It does nothing to address the responsibility of the wider community towards children.
We urge that the Government bring in accompanying measures -- including budget commitments -- to provide the counselling, education, and preventative programs, and the social and economic supports -- such as housing assistance, day care, improved welfare benefits, and income supports -- that would ensure women have alternatives to abortion.
For these reasons we hope the legislation will be opened for amendment in the parliamentary process.
- END -
The policy of the Anglican Church of Canada on abortion is stated in:
"Abortion In a New Perspective": Report of the Task Force on Abortion and is available from: The Anglican Book Centre, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2J6
For further information contact: The Reverend Michael Ingham, Principal Secretary to the Primate, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario, (416) 924-9192; Mrs. Diane Marshall (Family therapist, Report co-author) (416) 487-3613; Mrs. Phyllis Creighton (Research historian, Report co-author) (416) 978-2245
Subjects
Abortion - Law and legislation - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Sexual ethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Human embryo - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Medical ethics - Canada
Women's rights - Canada
Birth control - Canada
Birth control - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Contraception - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poor women - Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Church Seeks Third Option in Abortion Debate: Neither Woman nor Foetus Should be Victim, Report Says

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official1843
Date
1988 May 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1988 May 13
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
For immediate release
Mississauga, May 13, 1988 -- The Anglican Church will today [EDITOR: Friday] attempt to define a third choice in the debate on therapeutic abortion.
A task force report to be delivered to the church's national executive council meeting here this afternoon, says: "Too often the abortion debate is couched in terms of a woman's right over her own body as against a foetus's right to life." It suggests the issue may be addressed from a new perspective in which neither the mother nor the foetus is required to serve as "victim."
"Christians hold a spectrum of personal views about the morality of abortion, from utter rejection of it to conviction that it is a personal ethical matter for a woman."
Either approach, the report suggests, is one-sided: either it ignores the cry of the unborn while trying to raise the status of women; or it remains indifferent to the plight of women while trying to protect the unborn.
The task force was convened in March to consider the Anglican Church's stance on abortion in light of the Supreme Court's decision in the Morgentaler case. That decision declared the provisions of the Criminal Code dealing with abortions to be unconstitutional. The church had previously expressed its support for the law.
The 15-page report recommends that the church continue to oppose unregulated access to abortion. The church, it says, sees abortion as "always a tragedy fraught with moral ambiguity...To resort to abortion lightly or casually is to degrade our humanity, to deny the responsibility and responsiveness of human nature."
SEEKING "TRUE" CHOICE
The report spends its greatest energy addressing the circumstances in which women "choose" abortion. In many cases, it says, the choice is hollow: When women choose to abort, it is frequently in coercive, lonely and grief-stricken circumstances where they feel completely unable to bear their child. Often the biggest problem facing the woman is her lack of a real social and economic support system. Many women who choose not to bear their children, then, make their decision out of alienation and hopelessness.
"For us as Christians, such despair cannot be left as the motive force...True choice must involve alternatives to despair."
The report says new legislation to regulate abortion should "establish procedures to make abortion available equitably across the country as a therapeutic measure for women whose pregnancies endanger their life or their physical or mental health." It says counselling should be required.
The report rejects the concept of legislating easy access to early abortion and more restricted access later in the term (after 12 weeks for example): "Abortion is always the taking of a human life and, in our view, should never be done except for serious therapeutic reasons. Any such line is arbitrary and seems to argue that the value of the foetus and the seriousness of abortion in the early stages will be discounted."
ABORTION OR POVERTY TOO OFTEN ONLY CHOICE
Noting that many women have a choice of aborting a foetus or bearing a child to live in poverty, the report urges an extensive program of social action to reduce conditions which make the choice of abortion more likely. It stresses the need for:
* more affordable housing;
* pay equity for women;
* a guaranteed annual income, and other financial measures "to secure the dignity -- indeed the survival -- of mothers and children;"
* universally accessible, publicly funded child care;
* an intensified national program to collect child support payments from delinquent fathers;
* better educational programs about sexuality, including contraception, in the schools;
* and other measures.
The council, which has been meeting since Wednesday, concludes late this afternoon.
- 30 -
For further information contact: Doug Tindal, Director of Communications, Anglican Church of Canada, (416) 924-9192 ext 286, (416) 335-8349 residence
Subjects
Abortion - Canada
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Sexual ethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Women - Canada
Birth control - Canada
Birth control - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Contraception - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Poor women - Canada
Poverty - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican House of Bishops Clarifies Church's Position on Abortion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6813
Date
1985 February 20
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Date
1985 February 20
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press Release
Text
Toronto - Enclosed is a statement issued on Feb. 14, 1985 by the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada. It will appear in the March issue of the Church's national newspaper the Canadian Churchman.
As a further Anglican resource on the question two study guides published by the Church are available from the Anglican Book Centre, 600 Jarvis St., Toronto. They are:
Abortion: An Issue for Conscience ($6.95)
The Abortion Question ($2.25)
Note: These are NOT policy statements, they are published, as Archbishop Scott says in a forward, to "assist in your continuing reflections"...on "a serious and complex issue."
- 30 -
For further information, please contact
Richard Berryman
Media Officer
Notes
Statement from the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada meeting in Mississauga, Ontario February 14, 1985
In response to current public concern about abortion, the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada has expressed its continuing support for the position previously stated by the Church.
The Bishops draw attention to a statement presented in 1967 to the Federal Standing Committee on Health and Welfare on behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada.
"We assert the general inviolability of the foetus and defend, as a first principle, its right to live and develop. We lay the burden of proof to the contrary on those who, in particular cases, wish to extinguish that right on the ground that it is in conflict with another right having a greater claim to recognition...We recommend that the only grounds justifying abortion to which the criminal code should refer should be serious threat to the life or health of the expectant mother...In cases where abortion is not indicated, the expectant mother should be given access to the skilled supportive services which can afford her the encouragement and help which she may need to continue the pregnancy and care for the child."
The House feels strongly that this statement expresses its mind at the present time and is the position from which further discussion of the issue should proceed.
The Bishops also draw attention to the resolution adopted in 1980 by the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada:
"That this General Synod, in proclaiming a Gospel of Life and Hope and Compassion for all of God's people, rejects the principle of 'abortion on demand' or for the reasons of convenience or economic or social hardship, and commits itself to strong support of:
a) such educational programs in the Church and comparable secular agencies which exist or may exist in the future for family life, birth control and social responsibility;
b) effective action to provide skilled counselling for families and individuals facing unwanted pregnancy;
c) community responsibility to ensure adequate practical help in the care and nurture of children."
This resolution is the official position of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Subjects
Abortion - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Bioethics - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. House of Bishops
Abortion - Law and legislation - Canada
Birth control - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Contraception - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

28 records – page 1 of 3.