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3. ECOJUSTICE Committee Tasks

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8274
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 25-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 25-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
Request the EcoJustice Committee of General Synod
- to provide dioceses with educational materials about all forms of gambling
- to maintaining a "watching brief" on government sponsored gambling activities, with input from the dioceses
- to collaborate with other denominations in monitoring and responding to gambling expansion in Canada. CARRIED #25-11-02
Subjects
Gambling - Canada
Gambling - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Affirmation of Resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council Relating to Conflict in the Middle East

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8283
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 34-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
Affirm the following resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council relating to conflict in the Middle East, numbered F1, F2, and F3 below:
F.1. Israel/Palestine.
This Anglican Consultative Council notes with increasing concern the continuing instability and violence in Israel/Palestine and the resulting economic and social disadvantage in vulnerable groups and communities, as well as the widespread destruction, fear, injury and loss of life in the area;
a) believes that the best way to achieve longer-term security and a lasting basis for peace is for each side to recognize the legitimate aspirations, rights and needs of the other;
b) condemns all violence against civilians;
c) while recognising the legitimate right to its own defence, believes that the present conduct of the State of Israel has raised the level of threat to Palestinians and thus escalated the violence, with its consequent threat to the security of all families and individuals within the State of Israel;
d) calls upon the Israeli Government and the Palestinian Authority, as well as individual politicians, religious groups and community leaders, to find a way of breaking the spiral of revenge violence by entering into a new joint formal process of negotiation, based on international, religious and humane values of truth, forgiveness and reconciliation, in order to move towards genuine peace, justice and stability in the area;
e) calls upon the Israeli Government to implement UN resolutions 242, 338 and 194; and supports resolution V.20 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference;
f) urges the member churches of the Anglican Communion and associated agencies to find new ways of supporting collaborative projects between Israeli and Palestinian, Jewish, Muslim and Christian individuals and groups;
g) assures the people of Israel/Palestine of its prayers for peace; that its prayers will be offered in the name of God who calls us all to a greater love for each other, our neighbours, those who are strangers to us and our enemies.
F.2. Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council:
1. Welcomes the proposed return of UN Weapons Inspectors to Iraq;
2. Calls on the government of Iraq to comply fully with UN resolution 687;
3. Believes that, on present evidence, military action against Iraq is not morally justified;
4. Calls, subject to reports from UN Weapons Inspectors, for sanctions, except for materials that could be used for Weapons of mass destruction, to be lifted.
F.3. Solidarity with ECUSA Position on Iraq
This Anglican Consultative Council affirms its solidarity with the position taken by the Episcopal Church, USA, in June 2002, in opposing unilateral military action against Iraq by the United States, and with the view expressed by the Presiding Bishop in his statement of 6 September 2002, that:
1. war holds the prospect of destabilizing the Middle East and we will all be better served to see our national energies and resources expended in resolving the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, such that Israel finds security and peace with its neighbours and Palestinians achieve statehood;
2. military action would surely inflame the passions of millions, particularly in the Arab world, setting in motion cycles of violence and retaliation, further straining tenuous relationships that exist between the United States and other nations;
3. the United States has the opportunity to express leadership in the world by forging a foreign policy that seeks to reconcile and heal the world's divisions and reflect its values and ideals by focusing upon issues of poverty, disease and despair, not only within the US but throughout the global community of which it is a part. CARRIED #34-11-02
Notes
Note re F2.2 It was noted that there has been a United Nations' resolution subsequent to 687.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (12th : 2002 : Hong Kong, China) - Resolutions
Middle East - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Israel - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Jewish-Arab relations - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Palestinian Arabs - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Economic sanctions - Iraq
Economic sanctions - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Iraq - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Iraq War, 2003 - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
United States - Foreign relations - Iraq
United States - Foreign relations - Religious aspects - Episcopal Church
Less detail

Anti-Racism Working Group Resolution (Revised) #028-05-04-03

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8876
Date
2004 March 4-7
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 36-03-05
Date
2004 March 4-7
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 36-03-05
Mover
Bishop Rod Andrews
Seconder
Mr. Matthew Kett
Prologue
The motion was presented with a change in wording in Clause 1 from what was circulated to Council in Document #028-05-04-03.
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
1. Re-mandate the Anti-Racism Working Group as a working group of CoGS, with representatives from each of the standing Committees of General Synod, the boards of the PWRDF and the Pension Fund, the Council of the North, the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples, and the Council of General Synod, to be appointed by CoGS, with due attention paid to some continuity of membership and to racial diversity within the working group.
2. Receive the "Charter for Racial Justice in the Anglican Church of Canada" as a working document, and refer it back to the Anti-Racism Working Group for further refinement, and to be used as the basis for future educational work.
3. Request the Anti-Racism Working Group to ensure the provision of anti-racism training for CoGS, the Standing Committees of General Synod, and Councils and Boards of the Church during the next triennium.
4. Request the Management Team to include budgetary provision for anti-racism work in the General Synod 2005 budget. CARRIED #036-03-05
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Anti-Racism Working Group
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Charter for Racial Justice in the Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 82
Date
2004 May 28 - June 4
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Act 82
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Bishop George Elliott
Text
That this General Synod request the General Secretary to write to the Prime Minister to:
- Call on the Government of Canada to press the Colombian government to fully implement recommendations made to it repeatedly by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCR), to bring an end to human rights abuses committed by the Colombian state security forces and the paramilitary, to sever links between security forces and paramilitary groups and to guarantee the rights of human rights defenders and other activists.
- Call on the Canadian government to strongly oppose growing U.S. military aid to Colombia (in both bilateral relations with the U.S. and multilateral forums like the U.N.).
- Press the Canadian government to monitor Canadian corporations doing business in Colombia (including crown corporations such as Export Development Canada) to ensure their activities do not violate human rights,
- Press the Canadian government to continue to support a negotiated political settlement to Colombia's social and armed conflict and strengthen the role of Colombia's social organizations in any future peace process.
- Urge the Government of Canada to support the call of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia to Colombian armed opposition groups to respect international humanitarian law. CARRIED Act 82
Subjects
Human rights - Colombia
Human rights - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Colombia - Politics and government - 1974-
Colombia - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Less detail

Communication with the Government of Canada Re Mr. Maher Arar and Mr. Abdullah Almalki #044-14-03-11

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8418
Date
2003 November 7-9
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 30-11-03
Date
2003 November 7-9
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 30-11-03
Mover
Chancellor Ronald Stevenson
Seconder
Mr. Matthew Kett
Prologue
Moved by: Mr. David Watts
Seconded by: Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
That this meeting of the Council of General Synod ask that the General Secretary:
1. communicate to the federal government and the Department of External Affairs, and Minister (Wm.) Graham, its displeasure at the government's decision not to conduct a public inquiry into the case of Maher Arar, the Canadian citizen who was detained in the U.S. by American immigration officials and deported to Syria where he was allegedly tortured and held in prison with no charges laid.
and
2. communicate to the ambassador of Syria in Canada its displeasure of the treatment of a Canadian citizen held in Syrian custody,
3. request the government to establish such a public inquiry into the case of Maher Arar,
4. urge the government to make every immediate effort to obtain the release of Canadian citizen Abdullah Almalki, currently being held in Syrian custody without charge, and reportedly being subjected to torture
Friendly amendment
The mover and seconder agreed to change the word "displeasure" with "grave concern," and in item 2 to change "grave concern of ..." to "grave concern at ..."
Amendment
Text
That the motion be amended by deleting item 2 and substituting:
1) communicate to the ambassadors of the United States of America and of Syria its grave concern at their countries' treatment of Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen,
Vote on the amendment CARRIED
Vote on the amended motion which now reads:
That this meeting of the Council of General Synod ask that the General Secretary:
1. communicate to the federal government and the Department of External Affairs, and Minister (Wm.) Graham, its grave concern at the government's decision not to conduct a public inquiry into the case of Maher Arar, the Canadian citizen who was detained in the U.S. by American immigration officials and deported to Syria where he was allegedly tortured and held in prison with no charges laid,
and
2) communicate to the ambassadors of the United States of America and of Syria its grave concern at their countries' treatment of Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen,
3) request the government to establish such a public inquiry into the case of Maher Arar,
4) urge the government to make every immediate effort to obtain the release of Canadian citizen Abdullah Almalki, currently being held in Syrian custody without charge, and reportedly being subjected to torture. CARRIED #30-11-03
Subjects
Arar, Maher
Almalki, Abdullah
Canada. Dept. of External Affairs
Canada - Foreign relations - Syria
Canada - Foreign relations - United States
Less detail

Ecojustice Committee #005-04-02-11 : 1. Gambling : 2. Statement on Gambling #005-04A-02-11 (replaces 2 a) and b) I. Gambling in #005-04-02-11

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8273
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 23-11-02
Resolution 24-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 23-11-02
Resolution 24-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod
a) Receive the "Statement on Gambling" from the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples. (Appendix A);
b) Request the EcoJustice Committee to work with ACIP to develop a statement on gambling for the Anglican Church of Canada;
c) Request the EcoJustice Committee to monitor gambling activities and their social and economic impact on Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.
Motion to table
Moved by: Mr. James Sweeny
Seconded by: Archdeacon James Cowan
That the motion be tabled. DEFEATED #23-11-02
Vote on the motion - #005-04A-02-11 Statement on Gambling CARRIED #24-11-02
Notes
APPENDIX A
(COGS Doc. #005-04-02-11 Appendix A)
Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples
Statement on Gambling
July 2002
As members of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples, we find the issue of gambling to be a challenging one. As we look at our communities who engage in organized gambling, we see both positive and negative outcomes.
Gambling has been a means of building up our communities that have suffered from lands taken and resources lost. Revenues from gambling allow some of our badly under-funded reserves to restore and rebuild social networks and programs, including education and training infrastructures; it has granted them the monetary resources to re-discover lost community ties and gathering places; it has provided jobs; and it has helped them on the journey to self-sufficiency and freedom from government dependency.
At the same time, gambling has torn down our communities, and created divisions between our communities, as reserves compete with one another over gambling contracts. Gambling has also created divisions within our communism, as casinos bring more destructive influences when people choose the social isolation -- and sometimes addiction -- of slot machines or bingo halls over social gatherings or church activities. We also see those same video lottery terminals slowly taking over the spaces in our arenas and community centres.
The paradoxes and the tensions continue. We recognize that institutional gambling is a much-needed source of employment for our people, yet we know that Indigenous workers in the gaming industry still receive unfair treatment, lower wages, and experience racism in their workplace. We see that gambling is sometimes our only means of raising funds for sports and recreation programs for young people, and we worry that institutional gambling will also displace and alienate these same young people, drawing them into an unhealthy lifestyle with possible ties to criminal elements.
For many of our people, gambling has been a respected part of our traditional way of life. It has been integrated into our cultures and connected to our basic values -- that life is to be enjoyed, wealth is to be shared, and that no one should go hungry.
Gambling has deep cultural significance for us. At wakes, for example, it provides a way for people to come together at a difficult time, to grieve and to celebrate. At the same time, we recognize and mourn the fact that over the years, some of the traditions that support healthy perspectives on gambling have been lost -- traditions that include the need to reclaim our ability to care for one another.
For those among us who have developed addictions in response to grief and loss, gambling presents a powerful temptation. As indigenous peoples, we are deeply pained when we see members of our communities -- sometimes members of our own families -- losing their possessions, their self-reliance and self-esteem, their families and friends, and sometimes even their own lives, to gambling addictions. Most of all, we think of the children in our communities who are neglected, who go hungry, and who search in vain for their parents outside of bingo halls and casinos. We know that it is the most vulnerable among us who are the most likely to bear these costs.
We see all of these conflicts swirling around us and we ask ourselves: How do we respond to the complex realities of gambling in our communities ?
Outright condemnation or expulsion of gambling is futile. Where would we draw the line ? Is it gambling to give money to the bank for our RRSP contribution, betting that we will increase our profits ? Is buying stocks a more formal, legalized approach to gambling, and one that we are actively encouraged to pursue ?
If, as a community, we choose to refuse funds that have been raised through gambling, how do we decide which funds to accept and which to turn down ? How do we know the true origins of the money placed in the offering plate ? Is any source of funding "pure" -- even the funding that comes to our church committees from the General Synod ?
We believe that gambling is here to stay. In response to its consequences we must address questions of responsibility, healing and pastoral care through our ministry:
- Why do people gamble in the first place ? How might the church provide people with opportunities for more meaningful interaction ?
- How should we take responsibility for the impact of gambling in our communities -- through rules and regulations, community decision-making processes, and/ore structures of accountability ? How can our communities balance the benefits of gambling with the social upheaval gambling so often produces ?
- How do we provide education, counseling and support in this context, particularly for young people ?
- How do we include a focus on returning to a traditional healthy perspective on gambling issues, particularly in raising our children ?
- What avenues and opportunities for healing are available to those who seek recovery from gambling addictions ?
- How do we respond through our ministry to the negative impact that gambling has on our people ?
As we walk with God through our Creator into this challenging territory, we tread lightly, waiting for the Spirit to guide us so that we may respond in ways that show respect for our shared traditions, that recognize our differing perspectives and experiences, and that address our varied needs.
Subjects
Gambling - Canada
Gambling - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples
Less detail

Ecojustice Committee #005-04-02-11 : III. Statement on Climate Change

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8281
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 32-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 32-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
1. Endorse the "Call to Action in Solidarity with Those Most Affected", a statement (Appendix C) prepared by ecumenical development and relief agencies in collaboration with the World Council of Churches Climate Change Programmes.
2. Request the General Secretary to communicate with David Hallman, Climate Change Coordinator of the WCC, to have the name of the Anglican Church of Canada added to the list of supporters.
3. Request the General Secretary to send a letter to the Prime Minister in support of the ratification of Kyoto Protocols, asking that a realistic and achievable implementation strategy be put into place as soon as possible. CARRIED #32-11-02
Notes
APPENDIX C
(COGS Doc. #005-04-02-11 Appendix C)
A Call to Action in Solidarity
with Those Most Affected by Climate Change
Appeal to Governments and People
on the Occasion of the
8th Session of the Conference of Parties (COP8) to the
UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
October/November 2002 New Delhi, India
Statement prepared by
Ecumenical Development and Relief Agencies in collaboration with The World Council of Churches Climate Change Programme
The overwhelming world scientific consensus is that human activities are causing observable changes to the global climate which are already having a significant environmental, social and economic impact, and are likely to have increasingly serious disruptive consequences as the century progresses.
There is growing evidence that weather extremes have become more frequent. Floods and droughts intensify. The mena global sea levels is rising. In the comming decades, according to the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, even a medium scenario predicts that changing climate conditions may turn 150 million people into refugees. A recent study, conducted by a renowned re-insurance company, speaks of an annual damage of up to US$ 300 billion. This pattern of climate events is consistent with what scientists predict would happen as a result of human induced global warming.
For us these prospects are cause for dep concern. We represent people and churches in poor communities who will be especially hit by the adverse effects of climate change, and also concerned people and churches in materially rich countires who wish to bear witness that global actions to combat climate change are too slow. In addition we speak for the churches' international network of relief and development agencies, which has more than 50 years of experience in working in response to natural disasters and in adressing issues of poverty and injustice. We are committed both to alleviating suffering when catastrophes occur, and also to particiapating in efforts to promote economic justice. Over the years we have been engaged in numerous development projects, but now relief and development agencies are faced with a new situation. Firstly, the increasing need for emergency aid may considerably exceed the moral and economic capacities available in society to respond. Secondly, we will see increasingly situations where many years of careful and engaged development are put at risk, or even wiped out, by sudden extreme weather hazards.
The consequences of climate change further accentuate the deep injustices, which exist between industrialised, and developing countries. Developing countries, where the majority of the world's population live, are more likely to be hit by weather anomalies, and lack the means to protect themselves against the impacts brought about by climate change. At the same time, the poor in these countries make only marginal contributions to glbal greenhouse gas emissions, while rich countries continue to be the prime producers. Moreover, there is a lack of commitment by leaders in the most powerful countries to take the necessary political and financial responsibility.
The overwhelming magnitude of the task can easily lead to indiffernce or to despair. Instead, there is an urgent need for action. Every effort must be undertaken to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.
The Kyoto Protocol is a first step in the global effort to combat climate change. The legal character and the compliance system are new elements in global institutional life. We call on all parties that have not yet ratified the Kyoto Protocol to do so, in particular the USA.
However, in the light of the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2000), we must be under no illusions. The impact of the Kyoto targets will only be very small. The Protocol needs to be followed up by much stronger efforts.
The Kyoto Protocol must be indeed ratified, but at the same we urge governments to proceed without delay with 'a new round of negotiations' whose targets must be determined in the light of the long-term perspective. Two basic requirements must be met:
1. Stabilisation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere at a level in accordance with the overall objective of the Climate Change Convention.
2. A fair distribution of rights and obligations, by establishing the concept of per capita emission rights for all countiries, as proposed in the 'Contraction and Convergence' scheme.
In order to achieve these requirements, strong actions must be taken in order to make possible the necessary transformation from fossil fuel to renewable energy. Developed countries must put a high priority to setting up steering mechanisms and incentives that favour renewable energy and non-fossil fuel based transportation. In developing countires, investment and development aid need to be directed towards ways of producing and using energy and systems of transport that are environmentally and socially sustainable.
The benefits of all these efforts to reduce the causes of gobal warming will take a long time to show their effects. In the meantime the climate will continue to warm emissions are still rising and greenhouse gases have a long life. Weather anomalies are therefore projected to increase in the coming years and decades. Consequently there is an urgent need for increased mutual assistance and help. to maintain a minimum of justice in our world, a new sense of solidarity is called for.
We appeal therefore to all people not only to persevere in the struggle for a more just and peaceful world, but to contribute to this goal in new ways. Only on the basis of such a new commitment will relief and development agencies be able to carry out their task in the future.
This task requires a response from each one of us. Through our witness we can encourage governments to advance on the road towards responsible reduction targets.
The statement is supported by the following Agencies associated to the World Council of Churches:
Association of Protestant Churches and Missions (EMW); Germany
Bread for all and HEKS; Switzerland,
Brot-fuer-ide-welt; Germany,
Christian Aid; United Kingdom,
Christian World Service; New Zealand,
Church of Sweden Aid; Sweden,
Church World Service; USA,
DanChurchaid; Denmark,
ELCA; United States of America
Global Ministries; The Netherlands
Justice, Global and Ecumenical Relations, United Church of Canada
National Committee of World Service and Development of The Presbyterian Church in Canada,
Norwegian Church Aid; Norway,
WEED, Germany
For more information, contact:
Dr. David G. Hallman, Climate Change Programme Coordinator, World Council of Churches
E-mail: dhallman@sympatico.ca
Website: www.wcc-coe.org
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Climatic changes - Religious aspects - World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches. Climate Change Programme
Kyoto Protocol - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Greenhouse gases - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Hallman, David
Less detail

Ecojustice Committee #005-04-02-11 : II. Statements from the Global Anglican Congress on the Stewardship of Creation

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8280
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 31-11-02
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 31-11-02
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod receive and endorse the declarations of the Global Anglican Congress on the Stewardship of Creation (Appendix B) and request the EcoJustice Committee to take appropriate action. CARRIED #31-11-02
Notes
APPENDIX B
(COGS Doc. #005-04-02-11 Appendix B)
Global Anglican Congress on the Stewardship of Creation
Declaration to the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development
The Good Shepherd Retreat Centre
South Africa, August 18-23, 2002
We desperately need a change of spirit. The environmental debate is as much about religion and morality as it is about science. Sustainable development us one of the most urgent moral issues of our time. It begins in sustainable values that recognize the interrelatedness of all life. Sustainable development cannot be defined in economic terms alone, but must begin in a commitment to care for the poor, the marginalized, and the voiceless. Therefore it is sustainable community that we seek. The ecological systems that support life, the qualities that sustain local communities, and the voices of women, indigenous peoples and all who are marginalized and disempowered must be approached from this perspective.
As we move into the third millennium, it becomes increasingly obvious that human beings are set on a path of unprecedented environmental destruction and unsustainable development. A profound moral and spiritual change is needed. Human exploitation of the environment has yielded not only benefit, but also appalling poverty, pollution, land degradation, habitat loss, and species extinction. Despite political and scientific debates in some quarters, it is clear that human desperately need to change.
We write as representatives of the Anglican Communion. Our 70 million members are present in 165 countries across the globe. They speak from their experience of the problems of development in both urban and rural communities. At all levels of the life of the communion the environment has repeatedly been identified as one of the key moral and religious challenges before us.
Religious faith properly understood can and should be a major force for change towards sustainable development, sustainable communities, and a healthy environment. Anglicans accept the need to oppose all forms of exploitation. Specifically, we believe that a better, more holistic, and religiously informed understanding of Creation, which recognizes that human beings are part of the created order not separate from it, will make a major contribution to the transforming change of spirit that is essential in the third millennium. We are committed to putting our faith into action.
Many different religious traditions start from the belief that the world primarily belongs to God and not to human beings. Land, sea and air belong first and foremost to God. At most they are entrusted to human beings who are expected, in turn, to respond with gratitude and to hand them on faithfully and intact to generations to come. As stewards of the environment human beings are required by God to act faithfully and responsibly. Other theological perspectives within the Christian faith also support a renewed ethics of caring for the whole creation.
All religious traditions call their believers to disciplines of life that show respect for the environment that we inhabit. We value life more than possessions. We value people more than profits. Based on this shared commitment this Anglican Congress calls on people of all faiths to act together by
-seeing creation as good, beautiful and sacred;
-understanding that humanity is a part of the created order, not separate from it;
-evolving a new relationship with the created order founded on stewardship and service, with production and consumption restrained by genuine need and not simply governed by desire;
-locating our unity in the Spirit that breathes life into all things;
-celebrating the glorious God-given diversity that is everywhere.
We therefore call upon Governments of all nations to support sustainable communities, by
-working together for peace, justice and economic prosperity within a context of ecological stability;
-refusing to subordinate the good of all for the good of some;
-recognizing the intrinsic worth of the diversity of life, as well as the inextricable link between biodiversity and cultural diversity on which the survival of indigenous peoples, indeed all humankind, depends;
-rejecting the destructiveness of the culture of militarism, that spends disproportionate amounts of money on armaments when so many people in the world are still hungry, and stockpiles nuclear weapons and materials at great cost to the environment and to human well being;
-recognizing that environmental degradation constitutes a violation of the universal declaration of human rights. Poverty and environmental degradation are interwoven and it is the poor, and the exploited, often on the basis of race and gender, who suffer most from this degradation;
-recognizing that development is not sustainable if it steals from present and future generations. The security of future generations can only be attained by addressing the urgent questions posed by the intolerable burden of unpayable debt, the challenges of unsustainable agricultural practices, and by the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to ecologically stable levels. To this end we recommend serious consideration of the principle of contraction and convergence;
-affirming that the rivers and the land, the sea and the air are a global commons, entrusted to human beings to be handed on faithfully and intact to generations to come.
-Defining the rules of international trade in ways that demand greater corporate responsibility in promoting greater inclusion of the marginalized and more sustainable environmental practices.
-Recognizing that current rates of HIV/AIDS present a profound challenge to sustainable community, which must be met by adequate and equitable access to education and treatment
Subjects
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Global Anglican Congress on the Stewardship of Creation (2002: Johannesburg, South Africa)
World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002 : Johannesburg, South Africa)
Environmental protection - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Sustainable development - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Sustainable development - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Ecojustice Committee #005-04-02-11 : IV. Resolutions Flowing from the 12th Anglican Consultative Council, Hong Kong, September 2002

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8282
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 33-11-12
Date
2002 November 8-10
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 33-11-12
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Rev. Canon Dr. Bill Prentice
Text
That this Council of General Synod:
Adopt as its own the following resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council, numbered A, B, C, D1, D2, E below, that specifically relate to the work of the EcoJustice Committee (adapted as indicated in italics to fit the context of Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada).
(Note: Resolutions of the 12th Anglican consultative council, numbered A, B, C, D1, D2 and E are attached to the minutes as Appendix E.)
Friendly Amendment
The mover and seconder agreed to the wording:
Adopt as its own the following resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council, numbered A, B, C, D1, D2, E below, that specifically relate to the work of the EcoJustice Committee (adapted as indicated in italics to fit the context of Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada) and refer matters of particular Sundays to the Faith, Worship and Ministry Committee. CARRIED #33-11-12
Notes
[N.B. Italics in electronic text indicated by text enclosed in quotation marks.]
APPENDIX E
Excerpted from Document #005-04-02-11, the EcoJustice Committee report to the Council of General Synod, November 2002
Resolutions of the 12th Anglican Consultative Council, numbered A, B, C, D1, D2, E (adapted as included in italics to fit the context of the Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada):
A. A World Fit for Children
This "Council of General Synod", in response to the United Nations Special Session on Children (May 2002) and the International Decade For a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010):
1. "Commits" to support the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child by advocating in support of the following:
a) building a world free from war, exploitation, abuse and violence, in consideration of the interests of children;
b) providing affordable and accessible healthcare [i.e. health care] for all children with a particular emphasis on HIV/AIDS prevention;
c) protecting the environment for this and for future generations;
d) ending the vicious cycle of poverty, including promoting transparency in expenditure and cancellation of the debt that impedes progress for children;
e) providing free and quality education that includes education for life including lessons in understanding, human rights, peace, acceptance and active citizenship;
f) engendering a real and effective commitment to the principle of children's rights in all sectors of society, including participation in religious civic and political structures; and
g) promoting active and meaningful participation of children in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating all matters affecting the rights of the child.
1. [sic i.e. 2] "Re-affirms the action of General Synod" to promote a culture of non-violence that values love, compassion and justice and that rejects violence as a means of solving problems;
2. [sic i.e. 3] "Encourages dioceses and parishes" to use worship and study resources that relate both to current world conflict situations and to the theological and Biblical questions involved in the development of a culture of peace and non-violence;
3. [sic i.e. 4] "Commits to sign onto `A Canada Fit for Children', a declaration on the entitlements of children in Canada and the obligations of the government of Canada under the Convention of the Rights of Children" (Appendix D).
B. Patents
This "Council of General Synod":
1) views with concern the increased levels of exclusion and marginalisation of the world's most vulnerable peoples as a result of the changes in the application of international patent law, in that:
a) patents on medications, particularly those related to HIV/AIDS are making antiviral agents inaccessible in parts of the world where their availability is critical; and
b) the practice of applying for patents on genetic and biological materials means that the developing nations are finding it increasingly difficult to maintain control over their own genetic and biological resources.
2) recognising that patent rights are intended to protect legitimate commercial needs and interests, "commits to work ecumenically" to engage in advocacy to ensure that ongoing changes to patent law both at national levels, and at the level of international trade agreements (GATT - General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade / TRIPS - Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights Agreement) protect the needs and interests of vulnerable populations and of developing nations.
C. World Summit on Sustainable Development
This "Council of General Synod", following the recent World Summit held in Johannesburg, South Africa:
1. supports actions in the five key areas identified by the Summit, namely water and sanitation, energy, health, agricultural productivity, and biodiversity and ecosystem management;
2. adds its voice of concern and support to those calling for a renewed and committed international approach to the control of those processes which increase global warming and affect climate change;
3. urges "dioceses and parishes" to celebrate the Sunday nearest to 1st June, World Environment Day, as Environment Sunday in order to raise environmental awareness across the Communion.
D. 1. Debt Burden
This "Council of General Synod" notes with satisfaction that there is movement with the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund that may offer some positive relief to the most heavily indebted countries; nevertheless, in view of the fact that the debt burden continues to cripple the economies and aspirations of the developing world, reaffirms its commitment to the campaign for debt relief and for a review of the conditions imposed on debtor nations.
D. 2. Funding for Disease
This "Council of General Synod", noting the continuing debt burden faced by African countries and being advised that debt relief could release an estimated $10 billion for the provision of desperately-needed medications for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and cholera, calls on nations and institutions to which African countries are indebted to find ways of relieving them of their debt in order that the money so released can be applied to the purchase of medications and treatment of disease on the continent.
E. Racial Justice
1. "affirms its commitment" to give increased attention to the implications of heightened bigotry and hate crimes against those designated as people of colour, indigenous peoples, and peoples of religions and ethnic origins or races, other than one's own who are currently migrating from their own countries, including refugees and asylum seekers;
2. "affirms the request of the Anglican Consultative Council to" the Anglican Peace and Justice Network and the Anglican UN Observer to prepare an overview of international implications of increased hostility and tension directed in many countries towards people of other religions, ethnic origins, colour and nationalities and to report to the Joint Standing Committee of ACC and the Primates;
3. states clearly that there should be no outcasts in our churches.
Subjects
Anglican Consultative Council. Meeting (12th : 2002 : Hong Kong, China) - Resolutions
Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989)
International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010)
Children - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Child welfare - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Children's rights
Nonviolence - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Patents - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Biotechnology - Moral and ethical aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)
World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002 : Johannesburg, South Africa)
Sustainable development - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecology - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Environmental protection - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
World Environment Day
Special Sundays
Debts, External - Developing countries - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Debt relief - Developing countries - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
World Bank
International Monetary Fund
Debts, External - Africa
Medicine, Preventive - Africa
Diseases - Africa
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Refugees - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Peace and Justice Network
Anglican Observer at the United Nations
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Eco Justice Committee #005-05-03

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8318
Date
2003 May 8-11
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-05-03
Date
2003 May 8-11
Source
Council of General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution 20-05-03
Mover
Mr. Matthew Kett
Seconder
Mr. David Watt
Prologue
Mr. Matthew Kett presented the report of the Eco-Justice Committee. Speaking to the issue of HIV/AIDS:
- PWRDF Executive Director, Mr. Andrew Ignatieff, told of the work of the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund in responding to the call from our partners in Africa. The Fund is also interested in working with aboriginal communities in Canada.
- Dr. Eleanor Johnson, Director Partnerships, reported that the General Synod Planning Committee had been approached to invite Stephen Lewis to speak at General Synod. The Partners in Mission Committee would like to bring the issue back to Canada and have parishes look at their response to the disease.
-The Rev. Canon Allen Box spoke of his work HOPE Africa, a social development wing of the Diocese of Capetown [i.e. Cape Town], and of the project he is involved in, which raises funds for a community in Africa where 40% of people are HIV sufferers.
-Bishop Barry Hollowell stressed that Council not forget the situation in Canada where the disease is on the increase, particularly in the prison system and in aboriginal communities. Our awareness and our ability to inform and keep information in front of people are imperative.
Text
That the Council of General Synod commend the HIV/AIDS document originating in Southern Africa for widespread distribution and action (see Appendix 1 of the PIMC Report to Council of General Synod).
It was noted that both EcoJustice and Partners-in-Mission recommended this motion.
Friendly Amendment
The mover and seconder agreed to add the words "and support the request of Partners in Mission for an educational session on HIV/AIDS at General Synod 2004" to the motion. The motion now reads
That the Council of General Synod commend the HIV-AIDS document originating in Southern Africa for widespread distribution and action (see Appendix 1 of the PIMC Report to Council of General Synod) and support the request of Partners in Mission for an educational session on HIV AIDS at General synod 2004" to the motion. CARRIED #20-05-03
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
AIDS (Disease) - Africa
AIDS (Disease) - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (37th : 2004 : St. Catharines, Ont.) - Agenda
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