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90 records – page 1 of 9.

2022 CLAY gathering postponed until August 2023

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43699
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Volume
148
Issue
2
Page
7
Notes
The CLAY National Planning Committee (NPC) announced on 13 December 2021 that the "next Canadian Lutheran Anglican Youth (CLAY) gathering, originally set to take place in summer 2022, will be postponed until August 2023. ... They cited fundraising difficulties among youth groups during the COVID-19 pandemic, concern about travelling in groups and fatigue as reasons for the delay, based on feedback from church leaders, youth groups and parents". "Sheilagh McGlynn, youth animator for the Anglican Church of Canada, acknowledged that some dismay about the postponement was likely". "Deacon Gretchen Peterson, assistant to the bishop for youth and leadership in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, stressed: 'Our main focus is to ensure CLAY 2023 is meaningful, impactful and a safe experience for all'". "This will not be the first time the pandemic has affected CLAY. The gathering planned for 2020 was postponed until 2021, and then took place online only." The 2023 CLAY theme will be "Ashes and Embers". "Highlight videos and recordings of keynote presentations from last summer's [2021] online CLAY gathering will be available on YouTube in early 2022".
Subjects
Canadian Lutheran-Anglican Youth (CLAY). Meeting (2021)
Canadian Lutheran-Anglican Youth (CLAY). Meeting (2022)
Canadian Lutheran-Anglican Youth (CLAY). Meeting (2023)
COVID-19 (Disease) - Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
COVID-19 (Disease) - Religious aspects - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Youth - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Youth - Religious aspects - Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
Youth ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
McGlynn, Sheilagh
Peterson, Gretchen
Less detail

Activists highlight Canada's role on 75th anniversary of atomic bombings

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42923
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 September
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 September
Volume
146
Issue
7
Page
1, 10
Notes
"Nuclear disarmament advocates, including a prominent Anglican voice [Phyllis Creighton], held an online event Aug. 6 [2020] to commemorate 75 years since the atomic bombings of Japan in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and to recognize Canada's role in the development and proliferation of nuclear weapons" (p. 1). "Atomic bomb survivor Setsuko Nakamura Thurlow gave the first keynote speech. Thurlow is a long-time advocate for nuclear disarmament, having inaugurated Toronto's annual commemoration of the bombings. In 2017 she jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize with Beatrice Finn on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons" (p. 1). "Anglican peace activist and historian Phyllis Creighton delivered the second keynote" (p. 10). "Creighton noted that much of the uranium ore used in the Manhattan Project came from the Canadian firm Eldorado Mining and Refining, which had a uranium mine of Great Bear Lake in the Northwest Territories. The company hired Dene hunters and trappers to carry 100-lb sacks of uranium concentrate on their backs over thousands of kilometres. Neither Eldorado nor the Canadian government warned the Dene about the radium content of the uranium or the dangers of radiation poisoning, Creighton says. Their community of Deline, was also left with 1.7 million tons of uranium waste dumped into Great Bear Lake, which caused many residents to develop cancer" (p. 10). "'It is a disgrace that we are facing the threat of nuclear weapons 75 years later [than Hiroshima], and nuclear annihilation', Creighton says. 'The risks are higher now than they were even at the height of the Cold War'" (p. 10).
Subjects
Creighton, Phyllis (Phyllis Joyce Manning)
Thurlow, Setsuko Nakamura, 1932-
Hiroshima-shi (Japan) - History - Bombardment, 1945 - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN)
Nuclear disarmament - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Nuclear weapons - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Uranium mines and mining - Canada
Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited
Dene - Northwest Territories
Less detail

Algonquin Spiritual Teacher in Residence appointed

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42023
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 February
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 February
Volume
145
Issue
2
Page
1, 2
Notes
"Indigenous spirituality has a powerful new voice at Christ Church Cathedral Ottawa. In a historic appointment, local Indigenous spiritual leader Albert Dumont has been named Algonquin Spiritual Teacher in Residence for a two-year term at the cathedral. During his term, Dumont will help educate members of the cathedral community on traditional Indigenous spirituality, while deepening the relationship between the diocese of Ottawa and the Algonquin nation upon whose unceded territory most of the diocese sits" (p. 1). "'I see it as very important', Dumont said of his new role. 'To me, it's an opportunity for people to know something about the Algonquin Anishinaabe in unsurrendered land'" (p. 1). "'Albert is not a Christian', [Dean Shane] Parker said. 'He is an Algonquin man who has been shaped by his community, of his ancestors, throughout his life. I feel that having him in the cathedral will help us to understand Algonquin spirituality in particular, but [also] Indigenous spirituality in the context of a relationship, because I believe at the heart of reconciliation is developing a meaningful relationship between non-Indigenous and Indigenous people" (p. 2). "Dumont himself was a Christian until he was 12 years old. However, it was the racism of his teachers, fellow students and community at large that gradually pushed him away" (p. 2). "Over the course of his life, Dumont has lived with chronic pain, and overcome a struggle with alcohol" (p. 2). "In his new capacity at Christ Church Cathedral, Dumont will share his knowledge wherever it is needed. Potential areas may include spending time with Anglicans engaged in music ministry, meeting with Anglican clergy to teach Indigenous spirituality and helping the cathedral to reach out to ecumenical and interfaith leaders" (p. 2).
Subjects
Dumont, Albert (South Wind), 1950-
Algonquians - Ontario
Christ Church Anglican Cathedral (Ottawa, Ont.)
Indigenous spirituality
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Ottawa
Parker, Shane A.D. (Shane Alexander Donaldson), 1958-
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada - 21st century
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
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Amidst rising global conflict, Anglicans work for peace on earth : Nuclear disarmament a key issue for Project Ploughshares

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42323
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 December
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 December
Volume
145
Issue
10
Page
1, 6
Notes
"The forward march of the [Doomsday] clock [now two minutes to midnight] suggests humanity is closer than ever to global destruction caused by its own technologies. In response, many Christians have sought to challenge the weapons and dealers of death. Through participation in Project Ploughshares and activism in their churches and communities, Canadian Anglicans are living out the call of the Marks of Mission 'to challenge violence of every kind and to pursue peace and reconciliation'" (p. 1). Cesar Jaramillo, executive director of Project Ploughshares has said "I don't know how one can measure human gloom ... But there is that sense of urgency around the [perception] that [things] seem to be getting worse, rather than better" (p. 6). Canadian Anglican Phyllis "Creighton's stand against nuclear weapons dates back to 1945, when she was 15 years old and 'horrified' by the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (p. 6). "Project Ploughshares is driven by a similar vision, which Jaramillo describes as 'reducing human suffering'. The organization seeks to accomplish this goal by working with NGOs, churches, ecumenical organizations and governments to enhance policies and regulatory frameworks aimed at promoting peace. Along with nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, Project Ploughshares focuses on protection of civilians and reducing the international arms trade" (p. 6). "Many Anglicamns have sought to raise awareness in their own communities. David Fletcher, rector of the parish of Lantz in Nova Scotia, participated in the protests against cruise missile testing in the 1980s as a student" (p. 6). "Having served in the Canadian military for five years, Fletcher is of two minds about the necessity of war. He says that 'there are probably circumstances where war may be unavoidable'" (p. 6).
Subjects
Nuclear disarmament - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Project Ploughshares
Disarmament - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Armaments - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Arms trade - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Peace - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Creighton, Phyllis (Phyllis Joyce Manning)
Jaramillo, Cesar
Fletcher, David (David John)
Less detail

'A mirror for the life of our church' : The history and role of the primacy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42061
Author
Gardner, Matt
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 March
Author
Gardner, Matt
Kidd, Joelle
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2019 March
Volume
145
Issue
3
Page
8-9
Notes
"The primacy has evolved throughout the history of the church. In 1893, the church's first primate was a diocesan bishop chosen from among the metropolitans whose only specific duties were to serve as president of General Synod and of the House of Bishops. Since that time, the office of primate has steadily grown to encompass a national episcopal ministry, in which the primate serves as a figure of unity and a reflection of the diversity, challenges and ministries of the church" (p. 8). "Misunderstandings about the primate's role are common, according to Archdeacon Paul Feheley, who has served as principal secretary to the last two primates. Anglicans on different sides of various debates will often send letters to [the Primate Archbishop] Hiltz asking for him to intervene in order to resolve an issue. But, Feheley notes, metropolitans actually have far more influence over matters than the primate. ... 'If you're looking for a whole ton of power, it's not the position to go for', he adds" (p. 8). "'Many of our early primates died from overwork', says [retired Bishop Michael] Ingham. 'The job is just too large for an incumbent to exercise responsibilities as a diocesan bishop as well. This has only become more true over time, rather than less. In 1969, General Synod adopted the model of a detached primacy, in which primates were no longer burdened by the responsibilities of a diocesan bishop" (p. 9). "[Former Primate Michael] Peers traces the seeds of reform to the 1830s, when Thomas Fuller proposed a synodical model of church government, in which dioceses would be led by a synod, or governing body of licensed clergy, lay representatives from the diocese's parishes, ex officio members, and the bishops. Over the following decades, this became the model the church follows today" (p. 9). "An 1893 [Solemn] Declaration which established the Church of England in Canada as a separate and independent body described the church as being 'in full communion' with the Church of England (as opposed to 'an integral portion'), Peers noted. ... 'In a time when there has been pressure to make the Communion more monolithic, more a single entity presided over by primates, I continue to look to this foundational document'" (p. 9). "'Our primates have been and are people of exemplary faith and integrity, asked to hold together the wide diversity of our Anglican Church of Canada with its challenges of geography, cultural and theological differences', [Bishop Linda] Nicholls says. 'Our primate is a mirror for the life of our church, and deserves our deepest commitment of prayer and support'" (p. 9).
Article includes a large colour photo of the primatial cross with caption: "The primatial cross is the only official symbol of the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. It was presented to General Synod in 1937 after the submission of numerous designs. The cross is made of silver gilt and features the arms of General Synod and of the four original dioceses of the Canadian church".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate - Office
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod - History
Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Archbishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada - Bishops - Office
Anglican Church of Canada - Government
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod. Solemn Declaration
Anglican Communion - Government
Peers, Michael G. (Michael Geoffrey), 1934-
Feheley, Paul (Allan Paul)
Ingham, Michael (Michael Colin), 1949-
Nicholls, Linda (Linda Carol), 1954-
Less detail

'A narrative of truth' : Jubilee Commission launches archival history research project

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43039
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 April
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 April
Volume
147
Issue
4
Page
11
Notes
"The Jubilee Commission, the body established by Council of General Synod to propose a sustainable funding base for the self-determining Indigenous church, has officially launched a new archival research project on historical funding trends for Indigenous ministry within the Anglican Church of Canada. Examining how funds have been made available for Indigenous ministry at all levels of the church's structure, the project will study historical records and stories passed down through oral history by Indigenous elders and knowledge keepers". "Reconciliation Animator Melanie Delva will lead the project". National Indigenous Anglican Archbishop Mark MacDonald said: "We believe that everyone profited from that work and from that ministry. There was some benefit to the Indigenous peoples. There was some loss to Indigenous peoples. What hasn't been told clearly, I think, is the way that this helped to enhance the infrastructure and ministry of the larger church". Jubilee Commission chair "Judith Moses says the commission came to look at the research project as 'something that will contribute to healing and reconciliation by coming up with a joint Indigenous/non-Indigenous church perspective' in the form of 'a factual assessment of what has transpired in our past colonial history up to present day'. The Jubilee Commission has proposed a two-year window for the project. To enable Delva to lead the research, General Synod will be hiring an interim animator, Indigenous justice, for one year with the possibility of extension".
Subjects
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada - 21st century
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance - History
Fund raising - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous Anglican Church - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada. Jubilee Commission
Delva, Melanie
Moses, Judith
Less detail

Anglican eyewitnesses escape Lytton 'inferno' : Residents face uncertain future after homes, churches destroyed

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43376
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 October
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2021 October
Volume
147
Issue
8
Page
1, 6-7
Notes
Anglican Church of Canada reconciliation animator Melanie Delva, and her wife Erin Aleck, were forced to flee their home in Lytton, British Columbia, on 30 June 2021 when the community was destroyed by a wildfire. "The flames consumed not just houses, but community centres, band offices and churches. Among the destroyed churches was St. Mary and St. Paul's Anglican Church, a historic wooden building nearly 150 years old located on Lytton First Nation. St. Mary and St. Paul's was one of two Anglican churches in Lytton. The other, St. Barnabas Anglican Church, survived the wildfire along with its rectory and parish hall. The Rev. Angus Muir, priest of Lytton Anglican Parish, lives in the town of Ashcroft located 80 km away, but regularly conducted services at the two churches in Lytton. He described an ongoing sense of dislocation felt by residents across the parish after the trauma of the fire" (p. 6).
"The Lytton wildfire was one of many that swept across British Columbia this summer, following a devastating heat wave that caused hundreds of deaths and which scientists have linked to human-caused climate change. As of Aug. 16 [2021], the B.C. Wildfire Service had recorded more that 1,500 wildfires across the province so far this year, leading to large-scale evacuations in many communities" (p. 6).
"Deputy Chief John Haugen of Lytton First Nation -- who is also warden at St. Mary and St. Paul's and a member of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples -- lost his home in the fire, as did his siblings. His nephew lost two homes" (p. 7).
In response to the wildfires, the "Territory of the People quickly began raising funds to help clergy provide cash to cover emergency funds for those made homeless or displaced, and to support future rebuilding. Meanwhile, the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) offered a grant of $5,000. Executive Director Will Postma said by the middle of August [2021], PWRDF had raised nearly $25,000 to support those affected by the fire" (p. 7).
"Amidst the disaster and its aftermath, Haugen said, many found solace through faith. .... Delva too has drawn renewed strength from her faith and from the knowledge that people are praying for her and her family. 'I don't know where I would be without my faith', she said. 'I know what matters now'" (p. 7).
Subjects
Wildfires - British Columbia - Lytton
Wildfires - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Delva, Melanie
Climatic changes - Canada
Climatic changes - Environmental aspects
Haugen, John
Disaster relief - Canada
Disaster relief - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) - Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Territory of the People
Less detail

Anglican Foundation gives out more than $1 million in grants in 2021

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43698
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Volume
148
Issue
2
Page
7
Notes
"The Anglican Foundation of Canada (AFC) awarded more than $1 million in grants in 2021 -- a total that executive director Scott Brubacher calls 'extraordinary' and potentially the largest in the foundation's 64-year history. ... By comparison, he said, the foundation typically grants between $700,000 and $800,000 per year". "The AFC launched its 'Say Yes ! to Kids' campaign in April [2021] to fund post-pandemic ministry programs for children and young people. The campaign blew past its $100,000 goal and had raised more than $110,000 by its official end on June 30. ... the foundation received 84 applications for post-pandemic youth programs with a total request of about $518,000. Donations enabled the AFC to fund 94 % of those applications, awarding more than $468,000 to 79 recipients during the fall grant cycle. An AFC news release described these disbursements as 'the largest one-time investment in youth-based ministry the Canadian church has seen'".
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Finance
Anglican Church of Canada - Grants
Say Yes! to Kids
Children - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Youth ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican heraldry a rich, artistic expression of church identity

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article42487
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 February
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2020 February
Volume
146
Issue
2
Page
1, 9
Notes
"After some correspondence and suggestions, the coat of arms for Mohawk Chapel [Brantford, Ont.] now has a finalized design and has been sent to England for review and royal assent. While Mohawk Chapel has a special status among Canadian Anglican churches -- being the first Anglican church in Upper Canada, the oldest surviving church in Ontario and one of only three Chapels Royal in Canada -- its grant for a coat of arms is by no means unique. Anglican heraldry boasts a rich and long tradition in Canada. The national church, as well as many Anglican dioceses, parishes, congregations, bishops and the Anglican Military Ordinariate all possess their own coat of arms" (p. 1, 9).
Barry Hill, chair of the Mohawk Chapel Committee, described the design of the Chapel's new coat of arms at a service to mark the 100th anniversary of a visit to the chapel by Edward, Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII, in October 1919. "Hill notes that the chapel still has a strong bond to the monarchy. Its status as a Chapel Royal denotes it as an establishment officially serving the spiritual needs of the Crown. 'It's part of our heritage in terms of our support of the British crown in the pre-revolutionary times .. We basically brought Anglicanism to this part of the country over 235 years ago', Hill says. The connection to the monarchy also bears relevance to discussions on treaties with Indigenous peoples, he adds, which were negotiated on behalf of the crown" (p. 9).
The Rt. Rev. Ralph Spence, retired bishop of Niagara, is the Albion Herald Extraordinary for the Canadian Heraldic Authority "who has designed many coats of arms for churches as well as communities and organizations across Ontario" (p. 9). Spence talked about "his recent work in helping design the coat of arms for Bishop Susan Bell, which was approved at the last diocesan synod in Niagara" (p. 9). Article includes colour illustration of Bishop Susan Bells' coat of arms.
"Heraldry is a system of creating symbols for the purpose of identification that has existed for many hundreds of years. Bruce Patterson [is] deputy chief herald of Canada and a parishioner of St. Barnabas, Apostle and Martyr Anglican Church in Ottawa" (p. 9). "Until 1988, Canadians had to apply for grants of arms in England. With the establishment of the Canadian Heraldic Authority, which exercises the power to grant arms in the name of the Queen by the Governor General, receiving approval for a coat of arms became considerably easier for Canadians" (p. 9).
Subjects
Her Majesty's Chapel of the Mohawks (Brantford, Ont.) -History
Hill, Barry (W. Barry)
Heraldry - Anglican Church of Canada
Heraldry - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Heraldry - Canada
Canadian Heraldic Authority
Spence, Ralph (David Ralph), 1942-
Bell, Susan (Susan Jennifer Anne), 1966-
Patterson, Bruce (Bruce Kenneth), 1967-
Less detail

Anglican Journal welcomes new staff writer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article43690
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Author
Gardner, Matt
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican Journal
Date
2022 February
Volume
148
Issue
2
Page
3
Notes
"Sean Frankling officially joined the 'Journal' team on Jan. 4 [2022], bringing experience in both print and digital media. A graduate of Carleton University's journalism program. Frankling has written numerous articles for the 'Toronto Star' since 2020". "Frankling is also a member of Little Trinity Anglican Church in Toronto. 'I've been going to an Anglican church since I was baptized at one as an infant', Frankling says. 'The purpose of journalism is to serve communities. This is a community I'm a part of, and I'm happy to have the opportunity to serve it'. Frankling replaces former staff writer Tali Folkins, who was named editor in October 2021".
Subjects
Frankling, Sean
Anglican Journal - Employees
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90 records – page 1 of 9.