Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

521 records – page 1 of 53.

600 Jarvis: A squat, brick building, ugly and inspiring

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article25422
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1998 [April]
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1998 [April]
Volume
[5]
Issue
Special
Page
14-15, 27
Notes
A history of the buildings that have housed the Anglican Church House.
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Headquarters
Anglican Church of Canada - Headquarters - History
Less detail
Author
Malton, Mel (H. Mel), 1963-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2008 Fall
Author
Malton, Mel (H. Mel), 1963-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2008 Fall
Volume
14
Issue
1
Page
26
Notes
A poem (which begins that begins: "Vegetarians before the fall,/ we haven't found much fruit, since./") about the remembered loss of beauty and peace before the fall and the call to live in such a way that that: "... all that fruit we thought we lost so long ago in paradise is/ grown again and ripened in a place we thought a desert./ And the morning breaks as perfect as the first./ It always did; we never noticed."
Subjects
Memory - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Loss (Psychology) - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Christian life - Anglican authors
Christian poetry - Anglican Church of Canada
Christian poetry, Canadian (English)
Less detail

Absences : Editor's page

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article29638
Author
Carriere, Vianney (Sam), 1947-2014
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2002 Spring
Author
Carriere, Vianney (Sam), 1947-2014
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2002 Spring
Volume
9
Issue
2
Page
3-4
Notes
The author talks about absence and memory and how "We can miss things we have known and lost, things that never were but that are imagined. We can miss things that we once had or people we once knew and we can miss things that never existed or that have never been a part of our lives". He talks about visiting Ground Zero in New York "where the absence of everything was overwhelming. ... . The people standing near me were silent, thoughtful, seeing something, perhaps, totally different from what I was seeing. Minds filling in what the eyes could not see. And missing things that had been, people who had been".
Subjects
Absence
September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001
Memory
Less detail

ACC Committees and Councils

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article22716
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1996 February
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1996 February
Volume
3
Issue
1
Page
6-7
Notes
A list of the various committees and councils (and members) chosen at or since the June 1995 General Synod whose mandate runs until June 1998. Includes: Anglican Book Centre Advisory Board; Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples; Anglican Journal Advisory Board; Archives Advisory Board; Council of the General Synod; Eco-Justice Committee; Faith, Worship and Ministry; Financial Management and Development Committee; Implementation Team; Information Resources Committee; Partners in Mission Committee; Pension Committee; and PWRDF Committee.
Subjects
Committees - Anglican Church of Canada - Membership
Less detail

Africans invite us to share a journey

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article29289
Author
Maxwell, Charlotte
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1999 Spring
Author
Maxwell, Charlotte
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1999 Spring
Volume
6
Issue
2
Page
16-17
Notes
The author, Africa development coordinator for the Primate's Relief and Development Fund, reflects on a meeting she attended in Nairobi in June 1998 dedicated to the concept of the "Reconstruction of Africa". "The Nairobi meeting consisted of a group of remarkable Christians -- there was no dominant leader -- some working inside churches, some in ecumenical councils, some in universities, some in secular organizations. In a three-year process, these activists have visited Africa's most troubled places. They have held dialogues with key national and and regional civic organizations as well as with intergovernmental organizations such as the Southern Africa Development Coordination Committee (SADC)". "What generates tremendous excitement at meetings like the one I attended in Nairobi is the knowledge that building modern, responsive institutions must involve a balance between the recognition of spiritual needs, the reality of debt and the destruction of social infrastructure, and the profound need to sustain the best of community values and practices. There is no sentimentality about this, nor is there helplessness. What there is is a willingness to forge alliances with other activists in civil society. The role of the North, its overwhelming command of economic power and Africa's relative lack of bargaining power, is recognized, but it is not seen as a way out of Africans accepting responsibility for their future".
Subjects
Africa - Politics and government - 20th century
Africa - Economic conditions - 20th century
Africa - Social conditions - 20th century
Less detail

After democracy, much work remains

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article26137
Author
Maxwell, Charlotte
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1997 Fall
Author
Maxwell, Charlotte
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1997 Fall
Volume
4
Issue
3
Page
9-10
Notes
A description of the work and achievements of the organization "Women for Peace" which was founded in South Africa in 1976 to work for peace and reconciliation. "PWRDF has a partnership of 10 years' standing with Women for Peace. In the past, PWRDF made grants towards the building of the Community Centres (Alexandra, Daveyton, Mfuleni, Munsieville). PWRDF now supports the Peace Program with a grant of $25,000."
Subjects
Women of Peace (Association)
Women - South Africa
South Africa - Politics and government - 1994-
Less detail

AIDS pandemic spreading to every corner of globe, says UN

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33820
Author
Ayoungman, Gordon
Mavunduse, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Fall
Author
Ayoungman, Gordon
Mavunduse, Diana
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Fall
Volume
13
Issue
3
Page
24
Notes
"This year, 2006, marks the 25th anniversary of the identification of AIDS, 10 years since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, and five years since United Nations member states unanimously adopted the 2001 Declaration of Commitment on AIDS. And still, 25 years after the first AIDS cases were reported, there is no sign of a halt to the pandemic, which is likely to spread to every corner of the globe, said Peter Piot, head of the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)".
Anglican Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane, Primate of the Church of the Province of Southern Africa, "outlined three priorities for achieving a world free from AIDS: [1] a comprehensive, holistic and integrated approach by all stakeholders in dealing with the pandemic; [2] constructive and creative partnerships between governments, the private sector and the broad church of civil society organizations including faith communities; and [3] a huge resource mobilization in order to curtail the spread of the pandemic".
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - History
AIDS (Disease) - Statistics
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Christianity
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Ndungane, W.H. Njongonkulu (Winston Hugh Njongonkulu), 1941-
Less detail

AIDS, Poverty and Women

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33789
Author
Bastos, Zaida
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Spring
Author
Bastos, Zaida
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Spring
Volume
13
Issue
2
Page
12-14
Notes
"HIV kills proportionally more men, women and children who are poor. The overwhelming majority of people with HIV, some 95 per cent of the global total, live in the developing world." "But the dour reality of AIDS in Africa is that it is intrinsically linked to poverty and in Africa, women are the poorest of the poor. All statistics agree: women are the group most affected by AIDS in Africa ... As well as poverty, their vulnerability to HIV infection is related to biological differences, the sexual behaviour of their partners, the exercise of power, social attitudes, and pressures in a context where poverty has a feminine face." "An important facet of AIDS in Africa is that women and girls are the primary caregivers for those suffering from AIDS". "With the economic fabric of Sub-Saharan Africa rapidly disintegrating due to the impact of AIDS, people are pushed towards riskier behaviour. Young girls with neither skills nor education step into the roles of their sick or dying mothers and look for ways of providing for families for whom they have become the sole breadwinners. .... The situation forces them into precarious lifestyles, often involving the sex trade. In such a context, they have little ground to negotiate for safer sexual practices."
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - Statistics
AIDS (Disease) - Africa
AIDS (Disease) in women
Women - Africa
Women and poverty
Less detail

Amity : At the cutting edge in China

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33697
Author
Thompson, Terry (Teresa) Reilly
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1997 Spring
Author
Thompson, Terry (Teresa) Reilly
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
1997 Spring
Volume
4
Issue
2
Page
14
Notes
The author, General Synod Archivist, attended an international meeting in Beijing. "With the help of our church partners in Hong Kong and China I was able to spend three weeks after the conference studying contemporary Christians in China and exchanging information and expertise about modern archives and records management". She visited the Amity Foundation office in Nanjing and spent time with the Rev. Stephen Ting, director of education and son of Bishop K.H. Ting. "The Amity Foundation has adopted the following goals as it moves toward the 21st century: To contribute to China's social development and openness to the outside world; To make Christian involvement and participation more widely known to the Chinese people; To promote friendship and exchanges between Chinese people and other countries, especially exchanges with NGOs of developing countries; To serve as a channel whereby the church involves itself in society and society come to know the church; To open up new paths of social service".
Subjects
Amity Foundation
Christians - China
Ting, Stephen Yanren, 1949-
Less detail

The Anglican Communion : A Growing Reality

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33732
Author
Eames, Robin (Robert A.H.), 1937-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Winter
Author
Eames, Robin (Robert A.H.), 1937-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2006 Winter
Volume
13
Issue
1
Page
9-13
Notes
"The following is the first of two lectures Archbishop Eames delivered last summer [2005] at the Virginia Theological Seminary's convocation. It is published here with permission".
"It is debatable if the Anglican Communion has faced a more searching period, more public scrutiny and more transparent heart-searching than in the past two years". "Has the Anglican obsession with sexuality been merely the tip of an iceberg hiding other deeper issues, which will ultimately dictate the future of the Anglican Communion ?" "With few exceptions the Anglican north and west began to recognize the extent of internal diversity which had existed long before the name of Gene Robinson became known internationally". Archbishop Eames goes on to discuss what are commonly known as "the bonds of affection" and the pressures on them including the legacy of colonialism; the development of autonomous provinces and the fact of inculturation in different societies; the Anglican avoidance of a central authority akin to the central curia of Rome; and tensions not just between provinces but also within provinces, dioceses and even parishes. "Such questioning brings me to another and perhaps more controversial issue. Is the real question about authority rather than sexuality ? Not just authority in terms of the authority of interpretation of Holy Scripture, but authority to be in communion among diverse and autonomous Provinces ...". The author's involvement in the Lambeth Commission demonstrated evidence that "cultural development across our Communion had become an equal if not a dominant ingredient within the bonds of affection. In saying that I need to be aware that conservative Anglicanism resents any argument that places cultural difference above questions of theological principle. .... Am I alone in thinking that at the root of those clashes [between conservative a liberal argument], irrespective of our personal allegiances or preferences, lies the failure of succeeding generations of Anglicans to accept that there are parameters to divergence in scriptural interpretation, there are boundaries to ecclesiological autonomy and there are limitations to what a world family of vague technical relationships can endure and still remain a cohesive entity." He considers the possible dilemmas "associated with what could be called `the practical working of communion'" and especially the potential effects on Anglican organizations that span provinces e.g. the Missionary Societies and the Mothers Union. "The impressions of the Anglican Communion I gained in the preparation of the Windsor Report are dominated by one word -- pain". He offers, from his personal experience, one possible solution for the Commission -- the concept of reconciliation, which he defines and outlines as a process. "Is it just possible that future generations will look at this [current] time not just as a negative era for Anglicanism but rather as an inevitable sign of growth, a sign of maturity even in the history of a most diverse world Christian family ?" "I have tried to point out some of the consequences of an international Church body in which aspiration to bonds is more visible than application to their realities. As far back as 1920 the Lambeth Conference concluded: `The Churches represented in (the Communion) are indeed independent, but independent with the Christian freedom which recognises the restraints of truth and love. They are not free to deny the truth. They are not free to ignore the fellowship'. The Windsor Report took this question and commented: `This means that any development needs to be explored for its resonance with the truth, and with the utmost charity on the part of all -- charity that grants that a new thing can be offered humbly and with integrity, and charity that might refrain from an action which might harm a sister or brother'."
Subjects
Anglican Communion - 21st century
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Structure
Anglican Communion - Provinces
Anglican Communion - Parties and movements
Authority - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Christianity and culture - Anglican Communion
Windsor Report
Reconciliation - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Less detail

521 records – page 1 of 53.