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Committee on Permanent Secretaryship

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9503
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Chancellor Harris
Seconder
Col. J.H.V. Preston
Prologue
The Report of the Committee on Secretaryship was presented by Chancellor Harris. (See p. 343).
Text
That the report be received. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
XXV. Report of Committee on a Secretaryship
To the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada.
We have been requested by the Primate to present the arguments pro and con in respect of the appointment of a full time Secretary of the General Synod.
The Hon. Clerical Secretary
1. At the present time, the Honorary Clerical Secretary of the Lower House, is elected at the opening session of the Synod. During the session, he keeps the minutes of the Lower House and of Joint Sessions, and later prepares the Journals of the Synod for printing, and is an exceedingly important officer of the Synod. His duties are defined by Section 16 of the Constitution.
Between sessions of the Synod he performs similar duties for the Executive Council at its annual meetings, and for the Executive Committee of the Council.
When a session of the Synod is to take place, he receives all notices of motion, memorials and reports and in association with the Executive Committee of the Council and the Agenda Committee, prepares the Convening Circular, containing all such material, sending copies to all members of the Synod -- a heavy task.
He also receives all certificates of election of members of the Lower House, and is an important member of the Committee on Elections and Credentials.
There is considerable correspondence throughout the year about changes in the representation of Dioceses in the Executive Council and changes in Committees, and respecting business coming before the Executive Council.
All records are in his custody.
For these duties, the clerical Secretary is usually voted an honorarium of $100.00 at each session of the Executive Council. ($200.00 in 1941) paid from the revenue from the Executive Council Fund. At the last session of the Synod in Halifax, an honorarium of $400.00 was voted to the Clerical Secretary and $100.00 to the Lay Secretary, we believe that in all these instances the honorarium was well earned.
The Proposal
2. What is now proposed is the enlargement of the duties of the Clerical (or Lay) Secretary so that he will give his full time to the work of the Synod.
A survey of the Synod organization will show that to the duties of Secretary of the Lower House, outlined above, can well be added the following duties:
- (1) Secretary of the following Committees:
-- (a) Apportionment -- This committee organized since the last Synod has had, and will continue to have a very great and important task to do. It is now added to the work of Canon R.A. Hiltz of the G.B.R.E.
-- (b) Faith and Order, Life and Work.
--This important Committee with great possibilities, also has Canon Hiltz as its secretary.
-- (c) Reunion -- This Committee with equally great opportunities has Canon W.H. Davidson [sic i.e. Davison] of Montreal as its secretary.
-- (d) Evangelism -- A very active Committee with inter-Church contacts has as its secretary, Canon Judd of the Council for Social Service.
-- (e) Reorganization of the Synod. This important and active Committee formed since last Synod has as its Secretary, Mr. G.E. Main, General Secretary of the Pension Board.
-- (f) Among other standing Committees with Honorary Secretaries chosen from among their membership, which may require clerical assistance from time to time are:
--- Archives
--- Higher Education of the Clergy
--- Business relating to the Prayer Book and Hymnal
--- Church House management
--- Church Year Book
--- Statistics and State of the Church
--- Memorials to Deceased members
--- Elections and Credentials.
The work of several of these committees is growing in volume and importance. At present each of the General Secretaries of the four principal Departments of the Synod -- Missions, Education, Social Service and Pensions -- is burdened with the work of one or more of these Committees. Each of these Departmental Secretaries has already a full load of work and responsibility. Transfer of this extra work now imposed on these Departmental Secretaries, to another man would relieve the Departmental Secretaries and give them more time for their own assigned tasks.
During the past six years some twenty committees and boards have been set up by the Executive Council or appointed by the Primate. The organization of these Committees has been imposed in most instances on the Primate, the secretarial work has nearly always been assigned to a Departmental Secretary or the Chairman of the new committee. With a full time secretary of the Synod available this work would naturally be his task.
In a word, with the great increase in the work of the General Synod, its Executive Council, its five or six departments and its many Committees, more secretarial assistance has become an obvious necessity.
(2) At present the Primate is performing a large share of the routine work of the Synod, which a General Secretary might very well do. The Primate of the Church has not only the onerous duties of that office to perform, but in addition bears the full responsibilities of a Diocesan bishop and usually in addition those of a metropolitan bishop. In our opinion he should be relieved as far as possible of correspondence and routine duties relating to the General Synod and its activities. His health and strength demand this as well as the interests and welfare of the Church. He should not be as now, subject to the strains of office work, but freed as far as possible for personal and public contacts and spiritual leadership.
Whether the Primate resides in Toronto or in Eastern Canada or Western Canada, he needs at Church House, a full time official, who can be the link between him and his work and the work of the Synod, its departments and committees.
What has been said about the Primate is true also in respect of the Prolocutor who now has no one at Church House to whom he can turn over routine work and correspondence. If he is to be an effective member of all Boards, Councils and Committees he must be kept in touch with the work of the Synod and its departments and Committees, and given some clerical assistance in performing the task assigned to him.
(3) If a full time secretary can be employed it would undoubtedly make more effective between sessions, the work of the Executive Council and its Executive Committee. Matters sent to specially appointed committees would have the immediate assistance of the Secretary. The Executive Committee of the Council can be made of considerable more practical value as a clearing house, steering Committee and coordinating Committee only if it has an efficient Secretary whose duty it may be to carry out its resolutions and plans.
The Arguments Contra
Against such proposal three arguments are advanced or expressed:
(1) The fear that he would be a kind of super-secretary, exercising control over other Departmental secretaries, a General Secretary of the Church rather than of its Synod, interfering with departments and even Diocesan rights. It is of course necessary to make a clear definition of his field of action and of his duties, that he will take care of this objection and if he works under the direction of the Synod, its Executive Council and the Executive Committee of the Council, all representative of the whole church, there should be no real chance of setting up a dictatorship.
(2) The second objection voiced is the expense likely to be involved. His work may be as important as the work of any other Departmental Secretary. His task will be to do most of the work not assigned to the Departmental Secretaries and his remuneration should be on an equally fair scale.
He should have an office at Church House with the assistance of a stenographer-secretary. Office expenses would have to be estimated but there there would seem to be little if any need for any allowance for expenses. An estimate of $6000 would seem to be adequate for all these purposes and if the right man can be found the experiment would be justified in the interests of the Church in Canada.
(3) The difficulty of finding a man is also advanced. He should it is argued, have unusual personal qualifications and appropriate background and training; not a young man, but one experienced in the ways of our Church organization; possessed of the right personality, viewpoint and attitude; well and favourably known throughout the Church. We believe that if there is a need for such a man as defined above, one can be found well qualified within the ranks of the Church in Canada.
Appropriate notices of motion have been given in the Convening Circular for the purpose of bringing this whole question before the Synod.
Reginald V. Harris
While I agree with Chancellor Harris' argument in the main, I feel that the expense involved is an insuperable argument against the creation of the salaried position of Secretary of the General Synod at the present time, and until funds are forthcoming from some source other than the assessment of the Dioceses. War conditions make the expenses of holding the General Synod very high and if we are to have another Session at a cost of 24,000.00 even if it is only held at the end of four years, it will involve an annual assessment of $6,000.00 plus about $2,000.00 to pay for the organized publicity which has been so successful in raising the apportionment needed for the Church's work.
Until this question of a source of money to meet the expenses can be solved, I would suggest the matter be postponed and efforts made to get volunteers among the clergy and laymen to do the work which has been so carefully outlined by Chancellor Harris.
J.P. Bell
Sept. 1st, 1943.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Committee on Permanent Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. Committee on General Synod Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. General Secretary
Church of England in Canada. General Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. Clerical Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. Lay Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. General Synod - Structure
Church of England in Canada. Executive Council
Church of England in Canada. Primate - Office
Church of England in Canada. Prolocutor
Church of England in Canada. Executive Council. Executive Committee
Church of England in Canada - Finance
Less detail

Report of the Committee on General Synod Secretaryship

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9504
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Prolocutor
Seconder
Mr. J.P. Bell
Prologue
The Report (p. 480) was presented by the Prolocutor.
Text
That the report be adopted and the recommendation concurred in. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
XXIII. Report of Committee on General Synod Secretaryship
N.B. -- This Report was presented to the General Synod in 1943 and the following motion was passed:
"That action be deferred until the next Synod".
[1943 Synod edition of report includes minority opinion of J.P.Bell NOT included in 1946 Synod edition.]
To the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada.
We have been requested by the Primate to present the arguments pro and con in respect of the appointment of a full time Secretary of the General Synod.
The Hon. Clerical Secretary
1. At the present time, the Honorary Clerical Secretary of the Lower House, is elected at the opening session of the Synod. During the session, he keeps the minutes of the Lower House and of Joint Sessions, and later prepares the Journals of the Synod for printing, and is an exceedingly important officer of the Synod. His duties are defined by Section 16 of the Constitution.
Between sessions of the Synod he performs similar duties for the Executive Council at its annual meetings, and for the Executive Committee of the Council.
When a session of the Synod is to take place, he receives all notices of motion, memorials and reports and in association with the Executive Committee of the Council and the Agenda Committee, prepares the Convening Circular, containing all such material, sending copies to all members of the Synod -- a heavy task.
He also receives all certificates of election of members of the Lower House, and is an important member of the Committee on Elections and Credentials.
There is considerable correspondence throughout the year about changes in the representation of Dioceses in the Executive Council and changes in Committees, and respecting business coming before the Executive Council.
All records are in his custody.
For these duties, the clerical Secretary is usually voted an honorarium of $100.00 at each session of the Executive Council. ($200.00 in 1941), paid from the revenue from the Executive Council Fund. At the last session of the Synod in Halifax, an honorarium of $400.00 was voted to the Clerical Secretary and $100.00 to the Lay Secretary. We believe that in all these instances the honorarium was well earned.
The Proposal
2. What is now proposed is the enlargement of the duties of the Clerical (or Lay) Secretary so that he will give his full time to the work of the Synod.
A survey of the Synod organization will show that to the duties of Secretary of the Lower House, outlined above, can well be added the following duties:
- (1) Secretary of the following Committees:
-- (a) Apportionment -- This committee organized since the last Synod has had, and will continue to have a very great and important task to do. It is now added to the work of Canon R.A. Hiltz of the G.B.R.E.
-- (b) Faith and Order, Life and Work.
--This important Committee with great possibilities, also has Canon Hiltz as its secretary.
-- (c) Reunion -- This Committee with equally great opportunities has Canon W.H. Davison of Montreal as its secretary.
-- (d) Evangelism -- A very active Committee with inter-Church contacts has as its secretary, Canon Judd of the Council for Social Service.
-- (e) Reorganization of the Synod. This important and active Committee formed since last Synod has as its Secretary, Mr. G.E. Main, General Secretary of the Pension Board.
-- (f) Among other standing Committees with Honorary Secretaries chosen from among their membership, which may require clerical assistance from time to time are:
--- Archives
--- Higher Education of the Clergy
--- Business relating to the Prayer Book and Hymnal
--- Church House Management
--- Church Year Book
--- Statistics and State of the Church
--- Memorials to Deceased members
--- Elections and Credentials.
The work of several of these committees is growing in volume and importance. At present each of the General Secretaries of the four principal Departments of the Synod -- Missions, Education, Social Service and Pensions -- is burdened with the work of one or more of these Committees. Each of these Departmental Secretaries has already a full load of work and responsibility. Transfer of this extra work now imposed on these Departmental Secretaries, to another man would relieve the Departmental Secretaries and give them more time for their own assigned tasks.
During the past six years some twenty committees and boards have been set up by the Executive Council or appointed by the Primate. The organization of these Committees has been imposed in most instances on the Primate, and the secretarial work has nearly always been assigned to a Departmental Secretary or the Chairman of the new committee. With a full time secretary of the Synod available this work would naturally be his task.
In a word, with the great increase in the work of the General Synod, its Executive Council, its five or six departments and its many Committees, more secretarial assistance has become an obvious necessity.
(2) At present the Primate is performing a large share of the routine work of the Synod, which a General Secretary might very well do. The Primate of the Church has not only the onerous duties of that office to perform, but in addition bears the full responsibilities of a Diocesan bishop and usually in addition those of a metropolitan bishop. In our opinion he should be relieved as far as possible of correspondence and routine duties relating to the General Synod and its activities. His health and strength demand this as well as the interests and welfare of the Church. He should not be as now, subject to the strains of office work, but freed as far as possible for personal and public contacts and spiritual leadership.
Whether the Primate resides in Toronto or in Eastern Canada or Western Canada, he needs at Church House, a full time official, who can be the link between him and his work and the work of the Synod, its departments and committees.
What has been said about the Primate is true also in respect of the Prolocutor who now has no one at Church House to whom he can turn over routine work and correspondence. If he is to be an effective member of all Boards, Councils and Committees he must be kept in touch with the work of the Synod and its departments and Committees, and given some clerical assistance in performing the task assigned to him.
(3) If a full time secretary can be employed it would undoubtedly make more effective between sessions, the work of the Executive Council and its Executive Committee. Matters sent to specially appointed committees would have the immediate assistance of the Secretary. The Executive Committee of the Council can be made of considerable more practical value as a clearing house, steering Committee and coordinating Committee only if it has an efficient Secretary whose duty it may be to carry out its resolutions and plans.
The Arguments Contra
Against such proposal three arguments are advanced or expressed:
(1) The fear that he would be a kind of super-secretary, exercising control over other Departmental secretaries, a General Secretary of the Church rather than of its Synod, interfering with departments and even Diocesan rights. It is of course necessary to make a clear definition of his field of action and of his duties, that will take care of his objection, and if he works under the direction of the Synod, its Executive Council and the Executive Committee of the Council, all representative of the whole church, there should be no real chance of setting up a dictatorship.
(2) The second objection voiced is the expense likely to be involved. His work may be as important as the work of any other Departmental Secretary. His task will be to do most of the work not assigned to the Departmental Secretaries and his remuneration should be on an equally fair scale.
He should have an office at Church House with the assistance of a stenographer-secretary. Office expenses would have to be estimated but there would seem to be little if any need for any allowance for expenses. An estimate of $6000 would seem to be adequate for all these purposes and if the right man can be found the experiment would be justified in the interests of the Church in Canada.
(3) The difficulty of finding a man is also advanced. He should, it is argued, have unusual personal qualifications and appropriate background and training; not a young man, but one experienced in the ways of our Church organization; possessed of the right personality, viewpoint and attitude; well and favourably known throughout the Church. We believe that if there is a need for such a man as defined above, one can be found well qualified within the ranks of the Church in Canada.
Reginald V. Harris
J.P. Bell
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Committee on Permanent Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. Committee on General Synod Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. General Secretary
Church of England in Canada. General Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. Clerical Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. Lay Secretary - Office
Church of England in Canada. General Synod - Structure
Church of England in Canada. Executive Council
Church of England in Canada. Primate - Office
Church of England in Canada. Prolocutor
Church of England in Canada. Executive Council. Executive Committee
Church of England in Canada - Finance
Less detail

Report of the Committee on General Synod Secretaryship

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9505
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Ven. F.J. Sawers
Seconder
Mr. R.J. Lecky
Text
That the Primate be asked to appoint a committee to suggest names for the office of General Secretary to the Executive Committee of the Executive Council at its November meeting and that the Executive Committee be given power to make the appointment. CARRIED Message EEE.
Notes
Message EEE -- General Synod Secretaryship. (p. 76).
That the Report of the Committee on General Synod Secretaryship (p. 480) be adopted, and that the primate be asked to appoint a committee to suggest names for the office of General Secretary to the Executive Committee of the Executive Council at its November 1946 meeting, and that the Executive Committee be given power to make the appointment; and that the concurrence of the Upper House be requested.
Message 37.
That the Upper House concur in Message EEE of the Lower House.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Committee on Permanent Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. Committee on General Synod Secretaryship
Church of England in Canada. General Secretary
Church of England in Canada. Executive Council. Executive Committee
Less detail

Report of the Commission on Rural Work

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9506
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rev. C.R. Serson
Seconder
Mr. F.E. Compton
Text
This report (p. 477) was presented by the Rev. C.R. Serson, who moved its adoption, seconded by Mr. F.E. Compton. CARRIED Message CCC.
Notes
Message CCC -- Re Commission on Rural Work. (p. 76).
That the Report of the General Synod Commission on Rural Work be adopted (p. 477) and that the concurrence of the Upper House be requested.
Message 35.
That the Upper House concur in Message CCC of the Lower House.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Commission on Rural Work
Rural churches - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report of the Commission on Rural Work

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9507
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rev. Roland Bodger
Seconder
Ven. R.K. Sampson
Text
That a joint committee on Rural Work be appointed and be asked to report to the next General Synod and to the Executive Council. CARRIED Message DDD.
Notes
Message CCC -- Re Joint Committee on Rural Work. (p. 76).
That a Joint Committee on Rural Work be appointed and be asked to report to the next General Synod and to the Executive Council; and that the concurrence of the Upper House be requested.
Message 36.
That the Upper House concur in Message DDD of the Lower House.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Commission on Rural Work
Church of England in Canada. Committee on Rural Work
Rural churches - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Report on Reunion

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9508
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1946 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Rev. Dr. A.H. Priest
Seconder
Rev. Dr. R.F. Palmer
Text
The the General Synod gives authority to the Committee on Reunion to publish the report of Committees, as contained in the Convening Circular, together with the statement of the matter issued by the House of Bishops, such copies to be sold at cost. CARRIED in both Houses.
Notes
XIV. Report of the Committee on Reunion
To the Most Reverend, the Primate, and the Members of the General Synod:
Your Committee on Reunion begs to report as follows:
1. Meetings.
Since the last meeting of the Synod, your Committee has held eight meetings.
2. Executive.
Your committee has approved the appointment by the Primate of an Executive Committee of the Reunion Committee to meet the necessity of having a smaller body meeting regularly.
This Executive Committee has met at the times of the Quarterly Meetings of the Departmental Committees.
3. Travelling Expenses.
In order to provide for the necessary travelling expenses of members of the Reunion Committee or its Executive in attending meetings, a request was forwarded to the Board of Finance for a grant to cover this item.
By action of the Executive Council, at its meeting in November, 1945, this has been approved.
4. Library on Reunion.
We are happy to report that the nucleus of a General Synod Library on the subject of Reunion has been established under the curatorship of Mr. R.W. Allin.
5. In Memoriam.
We regret to report the loss by death of two of our most interested members in the persons of the Very Reverend Dean Harding, and Major Hethrington.
6. Conversation with other Communions.
It will be recalled that, at the Jubilee Session of the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada, held in Toronto in September, 1943, the following resolution, presented by the Committee on Reunion, was adopted in both Houses, and copies ordered to be sent to the Secretary of the Canadian Council of Church and to the Heads of the various Christian communions in Canada, viz: --
- "That this General Synod of the Church of England in Canada, now celebrating with thankfulness to Almighty God its Jubilee year, rejoices in the strengthening and unifying influence which General Synod has brought to the life of the whole Canadian Church during the past fifty years.
- "The Synod therefore welcomes this notable occasion to place itself on record in the two following ways:
- "First -- It calls upon the Church throughout Canada, both clergy and laity, to labour for a continuous growth of mutual understanding and appreciation among all members and sections of the Church, so that 'as a city is at unity within itself' our Canadian Church may bear a clear and steadfast witness to the unchanging truth of the Everlasting Gospel in a rapidly changing world, and makes its full contribution to the task of preparing the way for a reunited Christendom.
- "Secondly -- It hereby declares this Church's 'will to unity' with all others who acknowledge the One God and Father of us all, and, in sincerity, love and serve the One Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, relying on the guidance and grace of the One Holy and life-giving Spirit.
- "In token of its good-will and earnestness of purpose the Synod now expresses its hearty desire and readiness to meet, through its own representatives, in conference and prayer, with representatives of any Christian communion which shares its hopes and aspirations for a reunited Christendom, and it extends a cordial invitation to the Christian communion of Canada thus to initiate 'conversations'.
- "In the spirit of the Divine charity which 'never faileth', with penitence for our own sins and shortcomings, yet humbly confident in Him Who calls us into fellowship with Himself and with one another, the Synod now sends forth this invitation'.
As a result of this action, invitations were sent out to the United Church of Canada, the Presbyterian Church in Canada, the Baptist Churches in Canada, and the Lutheran Church. Replies were received, in due course, from the following Churches: The United Church of Canada, the Presbyterian Church in Canada, and the Baptist Churches in Canada.
Following these responses, committees were set up by your Committee on Reunion, to carry on "Conversations" with these bodies on a unilateral basis.
The "Conversations" with the Presbyterian Church and with the Baptist Churches have not yet proceeded far enough to bring any definite recommendations to the General Synod.
The "Conversations" with the United Church of Canada have, however, been going on since February, 1944, and your committee on Reunion has much pleasure in reporting the conclusions reached so far.
Your Committee on Reunion, through its Executive, in consultation with the Executive of the Commission on Reunion provided for by the General Council of the United Church of Canada, has given very careful consideration, amongst other matters to the practical steps which would require to be taken to secure a Ministry of the Word and Sacraments which would be mutually acceptable to both communions.
As a preliminary to this, a close study has been made of the Formularies of the United Church of Canada, and everything possible has been done to enable the members of the Commission appointed by the United Church of Canada to make a similar study of the Formularies of the Church of England in Canada; all this with a view to determining whether there was any doctrinal bar to negotiations looking towards the development of Christian Unity between these Communions.
Your Committee now reports that, in its view, the Christian Faith in all its essentials is set forth adequately in both sets of Formularies, and that, in this matter, both Communions are in real and substantial agreement.
Your Committee further reports that it is agreed that the first step towards Reunion should be the achievement of a mutually acceptable ministry, and, that, therefore, the report on this subject, attached hereto, which has received the general approval of your committee should be received and commended for study throughout the Church in Canada, (in groups to be arranged for by the Committee on Reunion, through its Executive), for a period of three years until the next General Synod.
We further recommend that the Committee on Reunion be reappointed and instructed to continue "Conversations" with the United Church Commission on Reunion and with those other Communions which have responded to our invitation, with a view to considering what further steps might be taken, and to the strengthening of our common will to unity, in the faith that a way may be found by which each Communion may make available to the other such features of its life and organization as have great and permanent value and which should be conserved in the Church of the future.
John Ontario, Chairman.
R.P.D. Hurford, Secretary.
REPORT OF COMMITTEES Provided For By The Church of England in Canada And The United Church of Canada On The Procedure Whereby Our Two Ministries Can Be Conferred Each Upon The Other With A Statement On The Related Question Of A Mutually Recognized Membership In Each Communion And With Two Attached Documents And A Bibliography Which Are Note To Be Regarded As Part Of The Report
[Report of Committees printed on pp. 413-430 of Journal of Proceedings but NOT included in electronic database.]
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada - Relations - United Church of Canada
United Church of Canada - Relations - Anglican Church of Canada
Christian union - Canada
Christian union - Anglican Church of Canada
Ministry and Christian union
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1943 September
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Bishop of Ontario
Seconder
Canon W.H. Davison
Prologue
The Report of the Committee on Re-union was presented by the Bishop of Ontario.
For report as adopted see p. 330.
Moved by the Bishop of Ontario, seconded by Canon Davison, that the report be received and be considered clause by clause. CARRIED in both Houses
Sections 1, 2, 3 adopted in both Houses.
Moved by Canon Davison, seconded by the Bishop of Ontario that sections 4, 5, 6 and 7 be adopted. CARRIED in both Houses.
Recommendations 1-6. CARRIED in both Houses.
Text
CARRIED as amended in both Houses. (See p. 333).
Notes
Copies of this are to be sent to the Secretary of Canadian Council of Churches and to the heads of the various Communions in Canada.
The report as a whole as amended was adopted in both Houses.
XX. General Synod Committee on Re-union
My Lord Archbishop and Members of Synod:
The Committee has met four times in the past twelve months at the Church House, Toronto. The total membership is forty-six, and the average attendance has been eleven. Several members have made contributions through correspondence. The resignation of Canon Eardley-Wilmot owing to ill-health was received with regret, and the Dean of Quebec was appointed in his place. Mr. R.W. Allin also resigned, and Mr. R.H. Pook has taken his place. At the last meeting Canon Calvert's name was added to the list of members.
Discussions have ranged over a fairly wide area, including such matters as Confirmation, the admission to Holy Communion of members of non-episcopal bodies, and the nature of co-operation with other communions in scattered areas. Bishop Farthing took the trouble to write at some length and set forth points which he felt should be emphasized in all approaches to unity, particularly stressing Christianity as a way of life, and so the hindrance of worldliness in everything which concerns the building up of that life. It is therefore desirable that "Evangelism should go with -- and a little ahead of -- Church union". Similar ideas were contained in a communication from Mr. J.W.E. Armstrong.
There has been a general feeling among the members of the Committee that there is a lack of the sense of urgency in regard to Christian Unity, and that something of an educational nature should be attempted to dispel ignorance and indifference. As a first contribution a careful and comprehensive survey was made by the Bishop of Ottawa of some representative statements on the general question, and copies of this survey were sent to all members of the Committee. Following this Canon Davison was requested to prepare a statement which would set forth some principles and practical suggestions. This statement has been reviewed by the Committee and approved, and is now incorporated in this report, as follows: --
. . . . ..
"That they all may be one ... that the world may believe".
Amidst the tragedy of a world torn by strife and war, there is a double tragedy and pathos about the Church: first, it seeming impotence and inability to fulfil its mission to the world, its "irrelevance" in the minds of many thoughtful people; secondly, its own divided condition, "by schisms rent asunder, by heresies distrest". In large measure, the second "note" is the explanation of the first. Yet a third note of tragedy and pathos is the widespread unconcern of so many Christians, both clergy and laity; the apparent indifference to the broken and wounded condition of the mystical Body of Christ; and the insensibility to "the great danger we are in through our unhappy division".
The key-words of the new world order, to which our thoughts, hopes, and prayers are directed, will be Reconciliation and Fellowship; and if, as St. Paul declares, there has been committed to the Church "the ministry of reconciliation:, within the Church itself the power and effectiveness of that ministry must first be demonstrated. "Physician, heal thyself !" There has been in recent years a great manifestation of the will to unity; but it is mainly confined to the leaders in the different communions, and we are still far from that adequate and informed public opinion in Christendom without which right action must tarry. If it is true that "'tis education makes the common mind:, then the general body of the clergy should strive to be "well educated" in this vitally important matter, that in turn they may educate the rank and file of the Church: "When thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren".
The following points are now stressed as indicating some of the conditions which are indispensable for a "forward movement" towards the goal of unity:
1. There must come a conviction of the sin of disunity: and of our personal and corporate responsibility in the measure that we acquiesce in it: "We are verily guilty concerning our brother". Our existing divisions are long-standing; yet if we manifest indifference to their continuance we are "accessories after the fact" and become partakers of other men's sins. And these divisions have the nature of sin because they are alien from the mind of Christ, contrary to the will of Christ, and in conflict with the prayer of Christ. Perhaps one of the deepest needs of the Church today is that it should be maintained as a Society of Corporate Penitence: vicariously for the broken and warring nations: personally, for its own sins and shortcomings, of which disunity is not the least. Concerning both it should acknowledge with deeper sincerity that that "the burden of them is intolerable".
2. Our desire for unity must be quickened; and it must be in harmony with that of our Lord who prayed "that they all may be one". This will involve the correction and adjustment of our particular outlook, which in one direction of another may be warped by prejudice, narrowness and sectionalism. Our desire and prayer must be for an all-embracing unity of all Christian peoples: Anglican, Orthodox, Roman, non-Episcopal. Advance on any particular "front" must be related to the general "strategy". Partial attempts must keep in view the ultimate fulfillment, and be "stepping stones" towards it.
3. Real and abiding unity will in all circumstances be an expression of loyalty to Truth and fidelity to Principle. It can never come through compromise, studied ambiguity, or acceptance of a "formula". It will be a unity of enrichment, following upon an understanding and appreciation of the positive truths to which different communion have given their particular witness. The aim on the part of all concerned will be to "speak the truth in love"; for
"Thou to man the truth declarest,
Help us all thy Truth to hear."
The sequence of petitions in the Prayer for the Church in the Communion Office is significant. We ask that God will "inspire continually the universal Church with the spirit of truth, unity and concord" and that all who confess God's holy name may "agree in the truth of thy holy Word, and live in unity and godly love". In each case Truth precedes unity and harmony.
The "economic" aspect is not unimportant. But where it is made a dominating motive, as it sometimes is, in thoughts about unity, it vulgarizes the whole matter. What matters supremely is that our all-controlling purpose shall be to know God's Truth and to do God's Will. The discerning mind, taught by the Holy Spirit of Truth, will consider not so much the persistence of honest differences, but whether these differences are of such a nature as to justify a continuance of separation and disunion. It will be guided by the maxim: "In necessary things, Unity; in doubtful things, Liberty; in all things Charity".
4. Because "nothing is real till it is local:, it is most desirable that in particular areas there should be "little Edinburghs", in which through conference and common prayer men of good-will and ardent desire, representing different Christian traditions, may gain a better mutual understanding and discover interim methods of co-operation. Christian action is paralyzed by dis-union; and the field of education is one conspicuous example of this.
On our part we should be prepared to initiate such conferences wherever there are signs that they would be welcomed: and we should be equally ready to confer with any who approach us in a spirit of sympathy and good-will. In either case, such endeavours should be under responsible direction; for otherwise will o' the wisp and well-intentioned efforts can easily deepen confusion and increase difficulties.
5. Is there any sound reason to prevent the launching in Canada of co-operative action analogous to the "Religion and Life" and "Sword of the Spirit" movements which already have done much to present a common Christian front in the Motherland ? Is there not a clear call to the different communions to seek a real measure of agreement and bear a united witness in matters pertaining to the new social order ? Such common Christian thought and action is essential to save mankind from the futility of merely "humanist" planning; and it might well prove to be "the next step" in the direction of organic unity.
6. Because of the unique position of the Anglican Communion, our Church will do well to consider two things. The first is the importance of an ever-growing harmony and mutual appreciation between the great traditional "schools" within our own fellowship, which will make for a fuller and more vigorous life. The second is the fact that, in the words of the Archbishop of Canterbury, "we shall impoverish our service of the wider fellowship if we let membership of our own communion become hesitant or indefinite". We shall seek to be our "best selves", not only for our own well-being, but for the sake of "the great Church" to which we hope to bring a real and not inconsiderable contribution.
7. There is one great condition apart from which unity cannot be attained or maintained: i.e. an ever-growing devotion and an ever-deepening surrender to the Person and Purpose of Him who is the one Lord and Master of us all, the only Saviour and Prince of Peace. In proportion as we severally "follow on to know" Him we shall be made ready to receive the gift of Peace; for Peace and Unity will ultimately come "from above" as God's "good and perfect gift", not as the result of even our best endeavours. We cannot "organise" it: He must, by His grace and favour, bestow it.
It has been charged that the Church is "complacent" rather than "militant". Too long this reproach has been justified; and not least in the matter of its divided condition. It is for us to pray and work for an awakening, which will fill us with self-despair and renew us with Divine hope; so that the splendid spectacle may be made manifest of the Church Militant going forward with its ranks closed to win the nations for the Prince of Peace.
The following recommendations are made in the hope that the clergy generally may find them practicable:--
1. That the whole body of the clergy should use, in the spirit of fellowship and with a common intention for unity, the "Litany of the Church" (No. 679 in the new hymn book), at least once a week in their personal devotions.
2. That the aspect of Penitence stressed earlier in this paper be given emphasis in the teaching and devotion of the penitential seasons of the Church's year.
3. That on the Feast of Pentecost (Whitsunday) definite teaching be given in every parish on the Nature and Mission of the Church and the urgency of the need for organic unity among all Christians be emphasized, together with its true "motive" (St. John 17:20-23).
4. That Christian Unity be made a subject of careful study and prayer by our clergy in their meetings, in joint discussions with ministers of other Communions, and by directed groups in parishes, and that the "Church Unity Octave" be carefully observed in all parishes.
5. Because "argument divides, but worship unites", the cause of unity will be helped by the study of the principles and structure of historical Christian worship. It is therefore suggested that all our clergy should become actively interested in "the Liturgical Movement" which is growing steadily in all parts of Christendom, non-Episcopal as well as Episcopal.
6. That reports of local efforts be sent to the General Synod Committee on Re-union.
. . . .
Nothing in the nature of particular concrete proposals has come before the committee for consideration but a definite conviction has developed that the time is now for our own Church to make some fresh approach to Christian communions in Canada, and that the Jubilee meeting of the General Synod should be the occasion for a gesture of this kind. The following resolution is therefore presented to the Synod for its approval:--
- Moved by the Bishop of Ontario,
- Seconded by Canon W.H. Davison,
- "That this General Synod of the Church of England in Canada, now celebrating with thankfulness to Almighty God its Jubilee year, rejoices in the strengthening and unifying influence which General Synod has brought to the life of the whole Canadian Church during the past fifty years.
- "The Synod therefore welcomes this notable occasion to place itself on record in the two following ways:
- "First -- It calls upon the Church throughout Canada, both clergy and laity, to labour for a continuous growth of mutual understanding and appreciation among all members and sections of the Church, so that 'as a city is at unity within itself' our Canadian Church may bear a clear and steadfast witness to the unchanging truth of the Everlasting Gospel in a rapidly changing world, and makes its full contribution to the task of preparing the way for a reunited Christendom.
- "Secondly -- It hereby declares this Church's 'will to unity' with all others who acknowledge the One God and Father of us all, and, in sincerity, love and serve the One Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, relying on the guidance and grace of the One Holy and life-giving Spirit.
- "In token of its good-will and earnestness of purpose the Synod now expresses its hearty desire and readiness to meet, through its own representatives, in conference and prayer, with representatives of any Christian communion which shares its hopes and aspirations for a reunited Christendom, and it extends a cordial invitation to the Christian communion of Canada thus to initiate 'conversations'.
- "In the spirit of the Divine charity which 'never faileth', with penitence for our own sins and shortcomings, yet humbly confident in Him Who calls us into fellowship with Himself and with one another, the Synod now sends forth this invitation'.
Subjects
Church of England in Canada. Committee on Reunion
Christian union - Canada
Christian union - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

[Messages From the Lower House: No. F. Asking for Lambeth Resolutions]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9573
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Chancellor Worrell
Seconder
Chancellor Davidson
Prologue
Message, From The Upper House
No. 4. Union
That the Upper House of the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada having taken part in the issuing of an 'Appeal to all Christian People,' from the Bishops assembled with the Lambeth Conference of 1920, and, having agreed to a resolution committing to the National, Regional and Provincial authorities of the Churches within the Anglican Communion, the task of putting the aforesaid Appeal into effect, accordingly send down to the Lower House the following Resolutions, and ask for concurrence in the same:
1. The Upper House of the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada welcomes and adopts the 'Appeal to all Christian People' contained in Resolution No. 9 of the Lambeth Conference.
2. The Upper House accepts Resolutions No. 10 of the Lambeth Conference as follows:
- "The Conference recommends to the authorities of the Churches of the Anglican Communion that they should, in such ways and at such times as they think best, formally invite the authorities of 'other churches' within their areas to confer with them concerning the possibility of taking definite steps to co-operate in a common endeavour, on the lines set forth in the above Appeal, to restore the unity of the Church of Christ".
The Upper House recommends that all formal invitations to the authorities of other Churches within the Dominion of Canada, and all conferences that may result therefrom, shall be in charge of a Special Joint Committee, to be appointed for this purpose at this session of the General Synod.
3. The Upper House also confirms the following Resolution No. 12 (B) (i) and (ii) of the Lambeth Conference Report:
- (i) It cannot approve of general schemes of inter-communion or exchange of pulpits;
- (ii) In accordance with the principles of Church order set forth in the Preface to the Ordinal attached to the Book of Common Prayer, it cannot approve the celebration in Anglican churches of the Holy Communion for members of the Anglican Church by ministers who have not been episcopally ordained; and that it should be regarded as the general rule of the Church that Anglican communicants should receive Holy Communion only at the hands of ministers of their own Church, or of Churches in communion therewith.
The Upper House also accepts Resolution No. 12, (A) (i) of the Lambeth Conference as defined in the following terms:
- "The Bishops of the Church of England in Canada will support the action of any Bishop who, provided there be no 'Canonical Impediment,' gives occasional authorization to Ministers not episcopally ordained, to preach in churches within his Diocese, and to Clergy of his Diocese to preach in the churches of such Ministers, provided that, in his opinion, such Ministers are working towards an ideal of union, such as is described in the Lambeth Appeal, it being clearly and distinctly understood that this involves:
- (i) The whole-hearted acceptance by such Ministers of all set forth in Paragraph VI of the 'Appeal to all Christian People,' which is as follows:
- "We believe that the visible unity of the Church will be found to involve the whole-hearted acceptance of:
- The Holy Scriptures, as the record of God's revelation of Himself to man, and as being the rule and ultimate standard of faith; and the Creed commonly called Nicene, as the sufficient statement of the Christian faith, and either it or the Apostles' Creed as the Baptismal confession of belief:
- The divinely instituted sacraments of Baptism and the Holy Communion, as expressing for all the corporate life of the whole fellowship in and with Christ.
- A ministry acknowledged by every part of the Church as possessing not only the inward call of the Spirit, but also the commission of Christ and the authority of the whole body;"
- (2) An expression of the approval of the ultimate acceptance of the Episcopacy for the United Church.
4. The Upper House accepts Resolution 12 (A) (ii), which is as follows:
- "The Bishops of the Anglican Communion will not question the action of any Bishop who, in the few years between the initiation and the completion of a 'definite scheme' of union, shall countenance the irregularity of admitting to Communion the baptized but unconfirmed Communicants of the non-episcopal congregations concerned in the scheme." They define the meaning of it as follows:
- "That by the words 'Initiation ... of a definite scheme of Union,' in Resolution 12 (A) (ii) we understand the formal adoption by the authorities of our Communion, and of a negotiating Communion, of a scheme of union based on the acceptance of the Lambeth Appeal".
Message No. 4 was received from the Upper House on the Lambeth Resolutions.
Text
That the Upper House be respectfully requested to transmit to this House the Resolutions of the Lambeth Conference, as it is impossible to consider Message No. 4 on Union until the said Resolutions are before the House. [p. 47]
Notes
Messages From the Upper House: No. 11. Re Lambeth Conference Reports.
That the President of the Upper House acknowledge receipt of request in Message F and present the Lower House with a certified copy of the Lambeth Conference Report. [pp. 154-155]
Schedule of Acts of Synod ....19. The approval and adoption of certain resolutions of the Lambeth Conference respecting an appeal to all Christian People with regard to re-union and certain provisions and resolutions in connection therewith. [p. 147]
[Text of "Resolutions Formally Adopted by the Lambeth Conference of 1920" including No. 9 "Reunion of Christendom" with "An Appeal to All Christian People" printed on pp. 196-218. Text NOT included in this electronic database.]
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1920 - Resolutions
Christian union - Anglican Communion
Christian union - Anglican Church of Canada
Ecumenical movement - Anglican Communion
Lambeth Appeal
Lord's Supper - Admission to - Anglican Church of Canada
Lord's Supper - Admission to - Anglican Communion
Lord's Supper and Christian union
Ministry and Christian union
Less detail

[No title available]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9574
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Chancellor Worrell
Seconder
Chancellor Davidson
Prologue
Message No. 11 was received from the Upper House conveying to the Lower House a certified copy of the Proceedings of the Lambeth Conference of 1920.
Text
Resolved: That the certified copy of the Proceedings of the Lambeth Conference be received and the Resolutions passed at the Conference be printed in full in the Journal.
Notes
Schedule of Acts of Synod ....19. The approval and adoption of certain resolutions of the Lambeth Conference respecting an appeal to all Christian People with regard to re-union and certain provisions and resolutions in connection therewith. [p. 147]
[Text of "Resolutions Formally Adopted by the Lambeth Conference of 1920" including No. 9 "Reunion of Christendom" with "An Appeal to All Christian People" printed on pp. 196-218. Text NOT included in this electronic database.]
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1920 - Resolutions
Church of England in Canada. General Synod. Journal of Proceedings
Less detail

[No title available]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9575
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Date
1921 October 5-15
Source
General Synod. Minutes
Record Type
Resolution
Mover
Mr. F.W. Blankenbach
Seconder
Mr. E.J. Fream
Text
Resolved: That the Memorial of the Diocese of British Columbia re expenses to Lambeth Conference be referred to the Executive Council for investigation and to report at the next General Synod.
Notes
Memorial 10. Re Expenses to Lambeth Conference, etc. To the General Synod of the Church of England in Canada.
The Memorial of the Synod of the Diocese of British Columbia humbly sheweth:
That at the Annual Meeting of the Synod held February 3rd, 1921, the following resolution was passed:
"That this Synod memorializes the General Synod requesting that, is not otherwise provided for, provision be made for the payment of the travelling expenses of the Canadian Bishops attending Lambeth Conference and the expenses of the members of the Executive Council of the General Synod when attending its meetings by including the amount required in the triennial Assessments on the Dioceses".
And your Memorialist will ever pray.
Signed on behalf of the Synod of the Diocese of British Columbia this 29th day of July A.D. 1921. Charles Columbia, Chairman. [pp. 512-513]
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1920
Travel costs
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of British Columbia
Less detail

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