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42627 records – page 1 of 4263.

Proposed new hymn book draws mixed reviews

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official2
Date
1995 June 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 7
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA -- (June 7) Anglicans meeting at their General Synod have expressed strong views on a proposed new hymn book which presents female imagery of God, inclusive language and a more extensive range of musical styles.
The 300-member body will decide later this week whether the book will be published.
George Black, chair of the Hymn Book Task Force, said the group tried to reflect "a collection of diverse voices" in the new book and to include new material on subjects which have been under-represented in previous hymnals, such as justice and peace issues, environmental issues and the call to ministry.
Some speakers at the General Synod hearing expressed strong reservations about proceeding with a new hymn book in a time of financial constraints, when the church already has two.
Some objected to the removal of old familiar hymns or to proposed changes to them.
Others, however, applauded the Task Force's emphasis on hymns with inclusive language and the proposed book's more modern style in both music and text.
Although most of the 682 hymns in the proposed book retain well-loved, traditional tunes, the task force has added material from a broad range of musical styles from countries around the world.
Not included in the book are traditional Christian hymns which use the imagery of war, such as Onward Christian Soldiers.
The task force said that hymns which spoke of the struggle against evil were still considered appropriate while hymns which suggested that war itself was positive were dropped from the new book.
The Anglican Church of Canada currently has two official hymn books -- the "blue" book published in 1938 and the "red" hymn book produced in 1971.
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Hymns - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Hymn Book Task Force
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Praise. 1998
Church music - Anglican Church of Canada
War - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
Less detail

New editor for Anglican Journal

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official3
Date
1995 October 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 October 16
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
TORONTO, October 16, 1995 -- The Reverend David Harris, an editor with the Halifax Chronicle-Herald, has been named Editor of the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Harris, who holds an MA in theology from Oxford University, became a reporter with the Chronicle-Herald in May, 1987, and a general editor in April 1991. Recently, he was appointed to the Chronicle-Herald's regular page one team.
In November 1994 Harris was appointed religion editor for the Chronicle-Herald and its sister publication, the Mail-Star. In the words of a colleague, "he transformed the religion page through his personal initiative and vision, to make it more engaging and responsive to its community."
Harris believes a similar approach will aid the Journal, which he praises for its attempt to be well-rounded and broadly representative of the church. "I think editorially it can become even broader," he said and in style and design I think it can be more focussed and reader-friendly."
Harris was in training for ordained ministry a decade ago but moved instead into journalism. In June of this year, he was ordained into a "non-stipendiary" (unpaid) position with All Saints Cathedral, Halifax. He has served the Diocese of Nova Scotia in several capacities, including a potentially divisive role as chair of an independent review committee on the diocesan newspaper. The committee was established after a dispute erupted over the paper's role. Harris' leadership in addressing the dispute has drawn praise from all sides.
Harris, 36, is married to the Reverend Dawn Davis, priest assistant at the Cathedral. He will commence his new duties on January 15, 1996, succeeding Michael McAteer who has been the interim editor of the Journal since June.
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Information Resources, 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Harris, David
Anglican Journal / Journal Anglican
Anglican Journal. Editor
Religious newspapers and periodicals - Anglican Church of Canada
Editorial independence
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Anglican Church affirms presence and contributions of gay men and lesbians

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official4
Date
1995 June 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 June 8
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
OTTAWA (June 8) -- The Anglican Church of Canada's governing General Synod has affirmed the presence and contributions to the church of gay men and lesbians and condemned bigotry, violence and hatred directed against people because of their sexual orientation.
After a passionate, four-hour debate, the General Synod also strongly endorsed three other resolutions arising out of the report of a Task Force on Homosexuality and Homosexual Relationships, struck three years ago.
- The Synod urges parishes and diocese to "continue, deepen and adapt" the learning and dialogue on homosexuality and homosexual relationships throughout the church, and;
- Urged the Primate to encourage dialogue on homosexuality and homosexual relationships throughout the church, and;
- Asked the church's bishops to indicate whether they are or intend to review sexuality guidelines they formulated in 1979. (The guidelines say the church will not bless same-sex unions and that homosexual people may be ordained but must remain celibate.)
Most of the debate at General Synod centred on the first recommendation -- the affirmation of the presence and contributions of gay men and lesbians.
Some Synod members felt that the church would do an injustice to its members by affirming the contributions of some, but not all.
Other Synod members said they could support the language of the resolution despite concerns about appearing to sanction homosexuality. "This does not commit me to condoning homosexual behavior, nor does it change the doctrine of the church," one Synod member said.
Before approving the Task Force resolutions, Synod defeated several amendments aimed at broadening the affirmation or at being much more general by affirming all Christians regardless of sexual orientation.
One speaker said he opposed broadening the resolution because "that removes the names of the people we are talking about and my understanding of Christian tradition is that names are very important."
- 30 -
Contact: Sam Carriere or Lorie Chortyk, Media Relations, General Synod. News Room: (613) 788-2600 ext. 2040 Cellular (613) 720-1468
Subjects
Homosexuality - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Parties and movements
Anglican Church of Canada. Task Force on Homosexuality and Homosexual Relationships
Anglican Church of Canada. General Synod (34th : 1995 : Ottawa, Ont.)
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Anglican Award of Merit

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official5
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Merv Bater of Winnipeg in the diocese of Rupert's Land, has been awarded the Anglican Award of Merit by the church's National Executive Council.
Mr. Bater has been co-ordinator of the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund in Rupert's Land since 1985 and is currently chair of the regional sub-committee for Latin America, the Caribbean and Canadian projects.
He is also a member of the Anglican Task Force on Ecumenical Coalitions and was the Anglican representative at the North American Consultation for Development Educators in Niagara Falls in 1988.
Mr. Bater was a member of the national Stewardship and Financial Development Committee between 1986 and 1989.
The Anglican Award of Merit is given to lay people who have made an outstanding contribution to the church, either nationally or internationally, over several years or who have performed work nationally or internationally over a short term that has had a significant impact on the church.
National Executive Council, also approved making the award to Madeline Critchell of the diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador and to Ian McCulloch of the diocese of Nova Scotia.
The awards will be presented by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Award of Merit
Bater, Merv
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Anglican Award of Merit

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official6
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Madeline Critchell, the first professional lay minister in the diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador has been awarded the Anglican Award of Merit by the church's National Executive Council.
Mrs. Critchell of Manuels, Nfld., has served as diocesan program officer and professional lay minister in the parishes of Bay Roberts and All Saints.
She has also conducted workshops in congregational development, life in the Eucharist, Confirmation training and Christian education. She has worked on the Congregational Development Kit and the Study on Sexuality and is currently a members of the National Executive Council.
The Anglican Award of Merit is given to lay people who have made am outstanding contribution to the church, either nationally or internationally, over several years or who have performed work nationally or internationally over a short term that has had a significant impact on the church.
National Executive Council, also approved making the award to Merv Bater of the diocese of Rupert's Land and to Ian McCulloch of the diocese of Nova Scotia.
The awards will be presented by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Award of Merit
Critchell, Madeline, 1931-2016
Lay church workers - Anglican Church of Canada
Lay ministry - Anglican Church of Canada
Less detail

Anglican Award of Merit

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official7
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 1
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Ian McCulloch of Chester, N.S., a solicitor for General Synod between 1985 and 1994 and chancellor of the Ontario Provincial Synod since 1988, has been awarded the Anglican Award of Merit by the church's National Executive Council.
Mr. McCulloch served on several committees of General Synod and departments of the national church. He participated in several church courts, provided legal assistance to the Inculturation and Finance Department and served on the board of directors of Anglican Foundation for twenty years.
He retired in 1994 and moved from the diocese of Huron to Nova Scotia.
The Anglican Award of Merit is given to lay people who have made an outstanding contribution to the church, either nationally or internationally, over several years or who have performed work nationally or internationally over a short term that has had a significant impact on the church.
National Executive Council, also approved making the award to Madeline Critchell of the diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador and to Merv Bater of the diocese of Rupert's Land.
The awards will be presented by Archbishop Michael Peers, the Primate.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Award of Merit
McCulloch, Ian (Ian Lesile), 1931-2017
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No prayer book revision for six years, commission urges, but new eucharistic rites are needed as soon as possible

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official8
Date
1995 March 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 3
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Toronto, March 3, 1995 -- After four years of research and study, an Anglican commission charged with evaluating the church's Book of Alternative Services (BAS) says there should be a new book -- but not yet.
However, the commission also calls for a supplementary resource to be produced as soon as possible. The supplement would incorporate a contemporary language eucharistic rite which is inclusive in its language and imagery about God; a rite which would allow local communities to include native spiritual traditions; a French language rite; and other services.
At the same time, the commission upholds the current status of the church's Book of Common Prayer now and in the future.
The evaluation commission was set up to examine the extent to which the BAS was in use across the country, its suitability for worship, and the extent to which it reflects Anglican theology.
The commission's report is at pains to recognize the tremendous importance which Anglicans place on worship, and it says any changes must be handled with great sensitivity and an openness to diversity.
People outside the church might scratch their heads in wonderment at the fuss. But the Anglican Church is defined, as much as anything, by its liturgy -- the formal rituals through which it gathers in worship. Small wonder then that the 1985 Book of Alternative Services, which provides more contemporary language for worship than the church's more traditional Book of Common Prayer, was controversial when it was introduced.
Today, the evaluation commission finds the book is in widespread use across Canada, though it notes the frequency and extent of BAS usage increases from east to west. The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) also remains in use, and most people are satisfied with the pattern of usage for both books.
Theologically, the commission says the BAS reflects an orthodox understanding of the Christian faith, but it is difficult to measure the book against "Anglican theological tradition" because that tradition is diverse and not limited to one definition.
Commission members were chosen to reflect theological competence and wide range of theological views, and they say the church "must achieve a balance between uniformity and diversity in its liturgical texts." But they reject calls by some for a single new prayer book to include elements from both the BCP and the BAS. They say both books should continue in use for another six years, then a commission should undertake a full revision of the BAS. The BCP would also continue to be available.
Meanwhile, a supplement to the BAS should be produced to meet several expressed needs, including what commission members refer to as two "unfinished conversations: native spiritual traditions and language about God.
"Both are points of acute conscience in the contemporary church," the commission's report notes." It says the church needs to experiment with listening to culture and innovation, along with critical reflection.
The commission also calls for the creation of a "theological commission ... representative of the diversity of theological opinion in the church, with the task of encouraging and promoting theological discussion in the church."
The evaluation commission's final report will be distributed later this month to members of the church's General Synod, who will consider its recommendations when they meet in June, 1995. Additional copies are available from the Anglican Book Centre.
The evaluation commission members are: Bishop Eric Bays, Regina (Diocese of Qu'Appelle; chair); Bishop Walter Asbil, Hamilton (Diocese of Niagara); Canon Dorothy Barker, Castlegar (Diocese of Kootenay); the Rev. Helen Belcher, Calgary (Diocese of Calgary); Canon David Boston, Halifax (Diocese of Nova Scotia); David Hall, Gander (Diocese of Central Newfoundland); Bishop George Lemmon, Fredericton (Diocese of Fredericton); Bishop Victoria Matthews, Toronto (Diocese of Toronto); Professor Terence Penelhum, Calgary (Diocese of Calgary); Ronald Stevenson, Fredericton (Diocese of Fredericton); the Rev. Murray Still, Craik (Diocese of Qu'Appelle); Professor John Webster, Toronto (Diocese of Toronto).
- 30 -
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Alternative Services Evaluation Commission
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Alternative Services
Anglican Church of Canada. Book of Common Prayer
Anglican Church of Canada - Prayer-books and devotions - History and criticism
Liturgy - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada - Liturgy - Texts - History and criticism
Liturgical renewal - Anglican Church of Canada
Lord's Supper (Liturgy) - Anglican Church of Canada - Texts
Inclusive language - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous spirituality - Anglican Church of Canada
Anglican Church of Canada. Primate's Theological Commission
Less detail

Embracing the `strangers'

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official9
Date
1995 February 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 February 28
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention: Diocesan Editors
What riches can be found in cultural diversity ?
Since the last General Synod, 17 Anglican parishes, from the Maritimes to British Columbia, have made a concerted effort to answer that question. For at least one parish, diversity has been a key to survival and growth. Several others have been forced to confront the "darker side" of multiculturalism -- racism and prejudice. To recognize that the problem exists and to begin to talk about it is often half the battle, they have found.
InterMission looks at the three-year-old Multicultural Parishes Project in April.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
InterMission
Multiculturalism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Racism - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Multicultural Parishes Project
Less detail

Where did they ever begin ?

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official10
Date
1995 March 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 March 27
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention : Diocesan Editors
For three years, a group called the Beginners has been working on a strategic plan to plot a future course for General Synod. Where did they start ? What kinds of things did they think about ? What principles guided them ?
In May, InterMission looks at the work the Beginners did through the eyes of one of them, Kathleen McLaughlin. Ms. McLaughlin, 29, was the youngest of the group, a management consultant with degrees in theology, business and electrical engineering, whose time was donated to the church by the high-powered firm of McKinsey and Company.
The whole concept of strategic planning, she says, is firmly rooted in the Bible. Even Jesus did it.
InterMission is a page prepared monthly by the Communications Department of General Synod and published in the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Contact Doug Tindal, Director of Communication 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence) or Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199, ext. 256
Subjects
Beginners
Strategic planning - Anglican Church of Canada
McLaughlin, Kathleen
InterMission
Less detail

The do's and don'ts of advocacy

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/official11
Date
1995 May
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Date
1995 May
Source
Anglican News Service
Record Type
Press release
Text
Attention : Diocesan Editors
The proposed strategic plan which goes to General Synod this month places a high priority on the church advocating for social justice.
How can this be done effectively ?
Experts on advocacy say that the church can have a voice in the corridors of power, but that the way advocacy has been practiced in the past may not be the most effective way to go about it.
In June, InterMission looks at advocacy -- how the church has done it in the past, and how it might approach it in the future.
InterMission is a page prepared monthly by the Communications Department of General Synod and published on the inside back cover of the Anglican Journal/Journal Anglican.
Contact Sam Carriere, editor, InterMission, 416-924-9199 ext. 256 or Doug Tindal, Director of Communications 416-924-9199 ext. 286; 905-335-8349 (residence)
Subjects
Social justice - Anglican Church of Canada
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of Canada
Lobbying - Canada
InterMission
Less detail

42627 records – page 1 of 4263.