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Telecommunications at LC 98

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36617
Author
Ford, Joan Butler, 1933-
Moore, Peter C. (Peter Childress), 1936-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1998 Easter
Author
Ford, Joan Butler, 1933-
Moore, Peter C. (Peter Childress), 1936-
Record Type
Journal Article
Journal
Anglican World
Date
1998 Easter
Issue
89
Page
15
Notes
Telecommunications have changed dramatically since the 1988 Lambeth Conference. "At Lambeth 1998 the Inter-Anglican Information Network (IAIN) Managers will enable the Lambeth news team and the Anglican Communion News Service to disseminate news and information immediately via the Internet". The conference will have an on-campus Telecommunications Centre and an "E-mail Centre". All conference attendees will be able to send and receive e-mail during Lambeth. A grant from Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York, has provided these services.
Subjects
Lambeth Conference, 1998
Inter-Anglican Information Network (IAIN)
Telecommunication in religion - Anglican Communion
Computers and the church - Anglican Communion
Internet - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Less detail

A Survey of Hymnody in the Church of England in Eastern Canada to 1909

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36674
Author
Cook, Donald F. (Donald Frederick), 1937-
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1965 September
Author
Cook, Donald F. (Donald Frederick), 1937-
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1965 September
Volume
7
Issue
3
Page
36-61
Notes
"The Journal is pleased to print a condensation of a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Sacred Music in the Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1965. The author, D.F. Cook, M.S.M., A.R.C.M., A.A.G.O., Ch. M., is organist and choirmaster of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, St. John`s, Newfoundland" (P. 36).
This "is an essay to trace the development of hymnody in that part of Canada which lies geographically east of Toronto, with some mention of the leading local figures and publications. In order to give the survey some cohesion the historical events and publications will be dealt with chronologically" (p. 36).
Article divided into sections: Preface -- Introduction: An Historical Sketch 1534-1800 -- Early Collections in Use in Canada -- Publications (1800-1850) -- First Steps to Uniformity -- John Medley, D.D. -- Dean William Bullock (1797-1875) -- Canadian Publications -- Appendix: Chronological List of Psalms and Hymn Collections for the Church of England, Published in Canada from 1800-1909 -- Footnotes -- Bibliography.
Page [35] of this issue incorrectly gives volume number as "VIII" instead of "VII". Correct volume number i.e. VII on front cover.
Subjects
Hymns - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Hymns - Church of England in Canada - History
Psalmody - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Psalmody - Church of England in Canada - History
Church music - Canada - History
Church music - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Hymnbooks - Anglican Church of Canada - History
Hymnbooks - Church of England in Canada - History
Book of Common Praise (1909)
Hymn writers - Canada - History
Jones, James Edmund, 1866-1939
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Nishga leader spent his life fighting for rights

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36390
Journal
Canadian Churchman
Date
1988 September
Journal
Canadian Churchman
Date
1988 September
Volume
114
Issue
7
Page
21
Notes
"Nishga Chief James Gosnell, who spent his life fighting for native rights, died here [in Prince Rupert, B.C.] in July [1988] after a year-long battle with cancer. He was 64." "In early 1973, when the Caledonia diocesan synod was held in the Nishga village of New Aiyansh, Chief Gosnell described his appreciation of Anglican Church financial help in taking the [land claims] battle to the Supreme Court. .... 'When the Nishga people continued to struggle for justice in our land, only the Anglican Church stood by us in our hour of need of need before the Dominion of Canada. As long as our river flows, regardless of whether we won or lose the case, this will be registered among the whole of the Nishga tribe'." "As well as being prominent in the land claims fight, Chief Gosnell was responsible for reviving a large part of the Nishga culture. Native songs and dances had been banned by the Anglican missionaries and after a lapse of 80 year they had been virtually forgotten by the Nishga. The few older natives would not perform the dances because of the church ban. However, Chief Gosnell and the Anglican priest at New Aiyansh, John Blyth, persuaded Chief Gosnell's parents that the church no longer considered such ceremonies as sacrilege. His father Eli, than 65, was authorized by the village to teach the songs and dances to the people. They were performed at the Caledonia synod in 1973 for the first time in 80 years".
Subjects
Gosnell, James, d. 1988
Nisga'a - British Columbia
Indigenous peoples - British Columbia - Claims
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Claims
Anglican Church of Canada. Diocese of Caledonia
Blyth, John (John Carter), 1935-
Less detail

Christian Mission in the Twentieth Century (Book review)

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article36645
Author
Yates, Timothy (Timothy Edward), 1935-2016
Reviewer
Burbidge, John W. (John William), 1936-
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1995 April
Author
Yates, Timothy (Timothy Edward), 1935-2016
Reviewer
Burbidge, John W. (John William), 1936-
Journal
Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society
Date
1995 April
Volume
37
Issue
1
Page
61-62
Notes
"The title of this fascinating study is slightly misleading. We have here not a history of missions during the century, but rather a history of the theory of mission -- what is now called 'missiology'. Of central importance to this history are the preparatory volumes to and the reports of the major missionary conferences from New York (1900) and Edinburgh (1910) to San Antonio and Manila (1989)" (p. 61). "Several interesting patterns emerge. First is the way in which each decade develops a distinctive focus -- from 'the evangelization of the world in this generation' to the conversion of communities rather than individuals, to the association between older and younger churches, and on to the encounter with non-Christian religions" (p. 61). "A second motif highlights differences between nationalities: the American impatience for immediate practical results, the German concern for thoroughly thought out principles that would ensure a solid extension of Christianity, the French emphasis on Christian presence (inspired by Foucauld), the Dutch fascination with Barthian theology, and the British statesmanship of Max Warren and Stephen Neill" (p. 62).
Subjects
Missions - Theory - History of doctrines - 20th century - Book reviews
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Reflections : [Without Easter, without the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ ...]

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34677
Author
Rowell, Geoffrey (Douglas Geoffrey), 1943-2017
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2007 Eastertide
Author
Rowell, Geoffrey (Douglas Geoffrey), 1943-2017
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2007 Eastertide
Issue
125
Page
50
Notes
Quotation from the Rt. Rev. Geoffrey Rowell, Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe re the significance of Easter and the resurrection for every Christian. "Without Easter, without the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ from the dead, there would be no Christian church. All that we do, all that we are, as Christians springs from this stupendous event in which the love of God in Christ leaps from the grave to the heights of heaven and draws us into the hope and joy and eternal life of a new creation. In a powerful phrase the great seventeenth-century Anglican bishop, Lancelot Andrewes, writes that 'his resurrection was a second birth, Easter a second Christmas'. Our baptism is our Easter, our being born again to this new life which Christ shares with us. As we live out our baptismal life our prayer must be that Christ will indeed Easter in us". Text of entire article.
Subjects
Easter - Church of England
Jesus Christ - Resurrection - Church of England
Baptism
Andrewes, Lancelot, 1555-1626
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Born among us : in China

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34225
Author
Amos, Clare
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Advent
2007 New Year
Author
Amos, Clare
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Advent
2007 New Year
Issue
124
Page
52-53
Notes
The author, currently Anglican Communion Director of Theological Studies, describes two resources which focus on the depiction of Christ in world art and the inculturation of Christianity. Some years ago the USPG (United Society for the Propagation of the Gospel), in cooperation with the Methodist Church in Britain, produced "an innovative pack of pictures and written materials called 'The Christ We Share' -- with contextual images of Christ from around the world. Many of the images were striking, some were controversial, all were thought-provoking." A new resource has now been produced. "Born Among Us" is "explicitly intended for 'all age' worship contexts, and for children in both church and school settings. It contains good quality visual images, information about the pictures and about the celebration and understanding of the birth of Christ in different countries of the world, suggestions for linked creative activities, songs and carols from a variety of countries, and the outline of a specially written nativity play which would help churches and schools pull together the ideas linked with the different and rich contents that the pack explored". Ms. Amos comments particularly on the section of "Born Among Us" that describes China with information about Chinese Anglican bishop Shen Zi Gao, and Chinese Christian artists Xu San Chun and He Qi. Includes a translated Chinese Christian prayer.
Subjects
Jesus Christ - Art
Christian art and symbolism
Art and religion
Christianity and culture - Anglican Communion
Christianity and culture - China
Christians - China
Christians - China - History
Holy Catholic Church in China - History
Shen, Zi Gao (Zigao), 1895-1982
Xu, San Chun
Qi, He, 1951-
The Christ We Share
Born Among Us
Christmas - Anglican Communion
Christmas - Study and teaching - Activity programs
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Editorial : Scepticism, History and Listening

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article34427
Author
Kaye, Bruce (Bruce Norman), 1939-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2005 June
Author
Kaye, Bruce (Bruce Norman), 1939-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2005 June
Volume
3
Issue
1
Page
7-9
Notes
Commenting on the current state of the Anglican Communion the author suggests that the intentional cultivation of scepticism would be a helpful addition to the conversation/debate. He refers to Rowan Williams' use of the term in the introduction to"Love's Redeeming Work", where "two kinds of scepticism are noted. First, a self-protective born of an experience of uncertainty in getting things right. A second scepticism is more reflective. If I can deceive myself then 'I need the presence of history and community to check my self-obsessions'." "This kind of scepticism could also be spoken of in terms of humility or reticence. It is to be found in the Windsor Report with its emphasis on conversation and listening. We are invited to listen because we may not have the whole truth, or perceive the particular qualities of the relations of human beings, as they concretely exist in family and society, which an Anglican faith is called to transform". "Anglican scepticism is a habit of the heart that should condition our own expressions and actions. Such a humility will move Anglicans to patience and to listening and in that process to value and to cultivate in the community an imagination that can point to ways in which we can have enough confidence as a worldwide communion to live by faith, not by sight, and walk patiently before our God".
Subjects
Humility - Anglican Communion
Listening - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Parties and movements
Scepticism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Skepticism - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
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People : New Zealand

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33878
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Trinity
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Trinity
Issue
122
Page
57
Notes
"The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia has opted for a new model of shared leadership that honours its three-Tikanga structure. The Primacy of the church will be amended constitutionally to comprise the three senior bishops, each carrying the title of Archbishop and Co-presiding Bishop. General Synod/te Hinota Whanio, meeting in Christchurch, named Bishop Brown Turei (Te Pihopa o Aotearoa), Bishop Jabez Bryce (Pasefika) and Bishop David Moxon (Pakeha) to form the new-model Primacy, with the expectation that they would share the joint role fully and publicly. Until the necessary legislative changes have been made, Bishop Brown will receive the formal title of Primate, described as 'holding the taonga of leadership'. The new Archbishops will each retain their present episcopal roles, but will be supported in their primatial duties by the other bishops and the General Synod Standing Committee".
Subjects
Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia - Bishops
Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia - Archbishops
Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia - Government
Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia. Primate
Turei, Brown (William Brown), 1924-2017
Bryce, Jabez (Jabez Leslie), 1935-2010
Moxon, David (David John), 1951-
Less detail

Restore mission to the heart of theological education : TEAC meeting ends with pledge to help renew theological education

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33578
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Easter
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Easter
Issue
121
Page
22-23
Notes
The Theological Education for the Anglican Communion Working Group (TEAC) met for a week in January 2006 [14-21 January] at Kempton Park, just outside Johannesburg, South Africa. "TEAC's members spent much of the week in five `target' groups, working on proposals to renew theological education in the Anglican Communion. Four of the groups focused respectively on the formation of lay people, vocational deacons, catechists and licensed lay readers; priests and transitional deacons; and bishops. The fifth group worked in `the Anglican way', drafting suggestions for enriching the distinctively Anglican elements in theological education at all levels, from parish and diocesan training schemes to Provincial seminaries, ecumenical TEE [Theological Education by Extension] programmes, and universities". Draft documents from the target groups are available on the TEAC pages of the Anglican Communion web site. Clare Amos is the newly-appointed Director of Theological Studies in the Anglican Communion. She will work closely with the Most Rev. Gregory Venables, Primate of the Southern Cone, who is the head of the TEAC steering group.
The group endorsed four principles for theological education and heard an appeal from the Rev. Mike McCoy to "restore mission to the heart of theological education". The group also heard extensive reports from Canon Oliver Duku, principal of the Bishop Allison Theological College (a college of the Episcopal Church of The Sudan currently based in Arua, Uganda); the Rev. James Massey, principal of the TEE College of Southern Africa (TEECSA); and members of the Governing Council of ANITEPAM.
On the last day, "Clare Amos told TEAC members that there were several ideas and proposals that TEAC would implement even while it awaited the response of the Primates in 2007. These included a joint project with the Compass Rose Society to send a core collection of books on Anglicanism to seminaries around the Communion; to compile a database of Anglican theologians; to develop the TEAC section of the Anglican Communion web site (www.anglicancommunion.org/teac); and to edit and publish resources for theological education".
Subjects
Theological Education for the Anglican Communion Working Group (TEAC)
Theological education - Anglican Communion
Duku, Oliver M. (Oliver Meru), 1936-2013
Bishop Allison Theological College (Arua, Uganda)
Theological education - Episcopal Anglican Church of The Sudan
Theological Education by Extension (TEE) College of Southern Africa (Johannesburg, South Africa)
African Network of Institutions of Theological Education - Preparing Anglicans for Ministry (ANITEPAM)
Amos, Clare
Venables, Gregory (Gregory James), 1949-
Less detail

Quicklines : The Archbishop of Sydney ...

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33675
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Easter
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2006 Easter
Issue
121
Page
51
Notes
Photo with caption: "The Archbishop of Sydney, the Most Rev. Peter Jensen, farewells Her Majesty and the Duke of Edinburgh".
Subjects
Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1926-
Royal visits - Australia
Jensen, Peter (Peter Frederick), 1943-
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NIFCON : Inter Faith Concerns Around the Anglican Communion : Building Bridges in Bosnia

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article33126
Author
Ipgrave, Michael (Michael Geoffrey), 1958-
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2005 Trinity
Author
Ipgrave, Michael (Michael Geoffrey), 1958-
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2005 Trinity
Issue
118
Page
44
Notes
The author, who has helped to organize the "Building Bridges" seminars since they began in 2001, describes the fourth seminar which was convened by the Archbishop of Canterbury 16-18 May 2005 in Sarajevo and jointly hosted by Dr. Mustafa Ceric, Raisal-Ulama of the Muslim community of Bosnia-Herzegovina, Metropolitan Nikola, of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Dabar-Bosnia, and Cardinal Vilko Puljic, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sarajevo. 25 participants met for three days of public lectures and private conversations on the theme "Muslims, Christians and the Common Good". "The theme of the seminar itself was developed around three motifs, each considered from both Muslim and Christian perspectives: respectively, 'Faith and national identity', for we are both believers and citizens; 'Governance and justice', taking into account both majority and minority situations, as well as the question of secularism; and 'Caring together for the world we share', with particular emphases on the twin crises of global poverty and environmental degradation".
"It is planned that a record of the Sarajevo conference will be published next year [2006], to join the series of volumes from earlier seminars in the 'Building Bridges' series: 'The Road Ahead (Lambeth, 2002), 'Scriptures in Dialogue (Doha, 2003), and 'Bearing the Word' (Georgetown, 2004) -- all edited by Michael Ipgrave and published by Church House Publishing, London".
Subjects
Interfaith dialogue - Anglican Communion
Christianity and other religions - Islam - Anglican Communion
Building Bridges Seminar (4th : 2005 : Sarajevo, Bosnia)
Building Bridges Seminar
Bosnia and Herzegovina - History - 1992-
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Communion Digest : Iglesia Anglicana de la Region Central de America

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article32180
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2004 Michaelmas
2004 Advent
Journal
Anglican World
Date
2004 Michaelmas
2004 Advent
Issue
115
116
Page
65
Notes
"The Rt. Rev. Julio Murray, the Bishop of Panama, took a high-profile stand before the country's general elections earlier this year [2004] when he warned each of the four candidates to limit their election promises and curb proposals that are `difficult to fulfil'. Following 21 years of military dictatorships, general elections -- he said at a meeting of the Latin American Council of Churches -- should be a `feast of democracy'. He added that while each candidate had ideas for trade agreements with the US and for tackling unemployment and corruption, they should be supported by `clear and specific plans'."
Subjects
Elections - Panama, 2004
Panama - Politics and government - 1981-
Christianity and politics - Anglican Church of the Central American Region
Anglican Church of the Central American Region. Diocese of Panama
Murray, Julio (Julio Ernesto Thompson), 1958-
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Concerning Church Conferences and Plans for Demobilization

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31917
Author
Lightbourn, F. Gwynne (Francis Gwynne), 1896-1976
Church of England in Canada. Diocese of Huron. Archbishop's Committee on Rehabilitation
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1945 March 15
Author
Lightbourn, F. Gwynne (Francis Gwynne), 1896-1976
Church of England in Canada. Diocese of Huron. Archbishop's Committee on Rehabilitation
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1945 March 15
Issue
118
Page
1-4 p.
Notes
"We present below as a basis for study and discussion a preliminary report prepared by the Archbishop's Committee on Rehabilitation in Huron Diocese of which Rev. F.G. Lightbourn of Stratford is Chairman. On the Committee are clergy and laity, mostof them veterans of the last or of this present war. This document is therefore realistic and doubly valuable. .... May we emphasize one or two items. 1. While the Canadian Government has made generous provision for the returning men and women (and these provisions are under review from time to time), they realize that Government authorities will need the goodwill and assistance of local committees, of Industry, of Labor, of Service Clubs, etc., and of individual citizens if we are to meet all the necessities of the cases. We must `get beyond organization'. The Church and church members therefore must be interested, intelligent, and helpful. 2. In the realm of moral, church people are called to uphold the Christian ideal. How to do this without any semblance of self-righteousness and at the same time to mediate, to reconcile, and to adjust our morally affected social life, will tax the best in us. ... The present writer draws special attention to those paragraphs of this document which deal with `bi-lateral readjustment; and `critical situations'. We can be thankful however, that in relation to the hundreds of thousands of men and women affected by this war, such critical situations will constitute but a small percentage of the whole. Through the courtesy of the Archbishop and of the Committee of Huron Diocese we are permitted to make this document available to the rest of the Church. We are deeply grateful". -- [Foreword], p. [1].
Contents: [Foreword] -- Government Booklets Obtainable Free -- For Re-Enlistment in Church and Society : From a Committee Report in Huron Diocese
Report contents divided into four main sections: I : The Task -- II : The Church for the Men and Women Returning from Service -- III : Methods -- IV : Conferences, Plans and Actions.
Last section consists of "Editorial" comments as follows: "May we venture once again to emphasize the value of Deanery and Diocesan conferences, sometimes of clergy, sometimes of clergy and laity, to discuss all sides of this task ? If no other opportunity is practicable in a widely dispersed diocese, what about a half-day session or a day's session at the time of Synod ? .... We endorse the Huron Committee's appeal for parochial consultation. We are glad to report that, since we first sent out the pamphlet of the Churches' Home and Front Fellowship League and since the appearance of Bulletin No. 112, we have heard of some conferences of deaneries and dioceses and we know of many parishes already alert and organized for action. This document from Huron Diocese will stimulate and give practical aid".
Subjects
Canada - Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945 - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Ex-service men - Civil re-establishment
Ex-service men - Civil employment
Canada - Social conditions -1945-
Less detail

The Prayer Books of the Church of Ireland 1551-2004

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31961
Author
Kennedy, Michael (Michael Charles), 1939-
Clarke, Richard L. (Richard Lionel), 1949-
Turner, Edgar (Robert Edgar), 1920-2016
Mayne, Brian (John Andrew Brian), 1934-2012
Reviewer
Sherlock, Charles (Charles Henry), 1945-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2004 December
Author
Kennedy, Michael (Michael Charles), 1939-
Clarke, Richard L. (Richard Lionel), 1949-
Turner, Edgar (Robert Edgar), 1920-2016
Mayne, Brian (John Andrew Brian), 1934-2012
Reviewer
Sherlock, Charles (Charles Henry), 1945-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2004 December
Volume
2
Issue
2
Page
[121]-125
Notes
"Four Irish liturgical scholars have written brief introductions to the successive prayer books (1549 hardly appeared there), to accompany the new one. Each writes clearly and accurately: the publisher's claim that `these essays give an insight into the way the worship and devotional life of Irish Anglicans has been formed over four and a half centuries is well justified" (p. 121).
Subjects
Church of Ireland. Book of Common Prayer. 2004
Prayer-books - Church of Ireland - Book reviews
Church of Ireland - Liturgy - History - Book reviews
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Creation and Re-creation : The First Hawaiian Christian Prayer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31493
Author
Chun, Malcolm Naea, 1954-2019
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2001 September
Author
Chun, Malcolm Naea, 1954-2019
Journal
First Peoples Theology Journal
Date
2001 September
Volume
2
Issue
1
Page
115-117
Notes
The author reproduces the "first" recorded Hawaiian Christian prayer of Ka'eleowaipi'o. "It is recorded that Ka'eleowaipi'o replaced the words of an anaana [sorcery] prayer with that of a Christian prayer. This prayer is called "Kuaikulani'. It is a prayer of salvation and a prayer used on a day of trouble or distress. [Text of prayer in Hawaiian and English.] In this fine example of liturgical indigenization we see how the creative mind, albeit genius, has been able to weave appropriate cultural elements and the proper ritual, that is the usage of the death prayer style of chanting as a form of negation for a new prayer to invoke life. There is very little of such patterns of liturgical development thereafter. A truly Native Hawaiian church needed and needs the elements that recognize and incorporate leadership and governance; the native usage of language; the appropriate and proper usage of traditional ritual and cultural elements, and the development of trust. That is what the forgotten voices hidden in the genius of this prayer speaks to us of, today" (p. 117).
Author is a Native Hawaiian and a lay member of the Episcopal Church. [Author ordained a deacon in 2011 and priested in 2012.]
Subjects
Hawaiians - Religion
Liturgical adaptation - Episcopal Church
Christianity and culture - Episcopal Church
Christianity and culture - Hawaii
Native spirituality - Episcopal Church
Ka'eleowaipi'o
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A First Nations Eucharistic Prayer

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31135
Author
Watkins, Mike (Michael J.)
Journal
Open
Date
2002 All Saints
Author
Watkins, Mike (Michael J.)
Journal
Open
Date
2002 All Saints
Volume
48
Issue
2
Page
6
Notes
"When the Council of Associated Parishes for Liturgy and Mission met in Sorrento, British Columbia, this spring [2002], we worshipped on Sunday with the parish of Scw'exmx near Merritt, BC. This First Nations community uses the following eucharistic prayer written for the community, blending English and their native language. .... The prayer is reprinted here with permission of Mike Watkins (priest in the congregation), who put it together. It is published here as an example of the way in which one congregation is finding its voice in liturgical prayer".
Subjects
Eucharistic prayers - Anglican Church of Canada
Liturgical renewal - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous peoples - Canada - Anglican Church of Canada
Indigenous languages - Canada
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Breaking barriers : rethinking our theology of baptism

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31136
Author
Schell, Donald
Journal
Open
Date
2002 All Saints
Author
Schell, Donald
Journal
Open
Date
2002 All Saints
Volume
48
Issue
2
Page
7-11
Notes
The author discusses the theology and practice of the open table for our sacramental understanding of baptism and eucharist. He begins by quoting the Lutheran theologian Maxwell Johnson, speaking about Jesus' meal practice. "Entrance to the meal of God's reign, anticipated and incarnated in the very life, ministry, and meals of Jesus of Nazareth, was granted by Jesus himself and granted especially to those who were not prepared and not (yet) converted, to the godless and undeserving, to the impure, and the unworthy. Conversion itself, it seems, was a consequence of, not a pre-condition for, such meal sharing." "With all that we pray that our eucharist will accomplish, open communion appears to me simply faithful. Open communion is plain sacramental realism, letting God use our sacraments to reveal locally God's already accomplished peace. It is as counter-cultural and uncomfortable as eating with prisoners in the county jail". "The Last Supper was emphatically not a gathering of the faithful for a closed meal. The Last Supper, just like all the other meals of his ministry, was an unmerited, reconciling act of divine hospitality". The crucifixion is linked to the eucharist. "In Jesus' shameful death outside the city gates and with the worst sinners he freely chooses communion with them". "The cross shows open table and baptism to be one sign. This death is also his `baptism', because again he submits to be joined indiscriminately to ordinary people (making one sign of his baptism by John, his feasting with harlots and tax collectors, and his dying with condemned murderers and terrorists). As the Gospels tell it, supper (rhetorically this concluding cup) leads to baptism".
Author is co-rector of St. Gregory Nyssen Episcopal Church in San Francisco.
Subjects
Open Table - Episcopal Church
Baptism
Lord's Supper
Lord's Supper - Admission to
Baptism - Episcopal Church
Lord's Supper - Episcopal Church
Lord's Supper - Admission to - Episcopal Church
Close and open communion - Episcopal Church
St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (San Francisco, Calif.)
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Tolerable Diversity and Ecclesial Integrity : Communion or Federation ?

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article31197
Author
Turner, Philip W. (Philip Williams), 1935-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2003 December
Author
Turner, Philip W. (Philip Williams), 1935-
Journal
Journal of Anglican Studies
Date
2003 December
Volume
1
Issue
2
Page
24-46
Notes
"Abstract: A series of issues have recently arisen that pose the question of whether of not the Anglican Communion will remain a communion of churches or become merely a loose federation. To remain a communion, Anglicans will have to come to some agreement about the relation between ecclesial integrity on the one hand and tolerable diversity on the other. The right balance check Incan
"Confronted as they are by fearfully divisive issues, Anglicans are faced with the option of `responsible theological reflection and dialogue' on the one hand; and acquiescence `in the coexistence of incompatible views, opinions and policies' on the other. One can see these options at work in relation to a series of issues that have appeared in recent years. One thinks immediately of the ordination of women, the blessing of `gay unions', and the ordination of non-abstaining homosexual persons, To this list can be added other points of contention. These include lay presidency at the Eucharist and replacement of use in public worship of the Trinitarian name (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) with common nouns denoting divine functions (e.g., creator, redeemer, sanctifier)" (pp. 24-25).
The author believes that if the Anglican Communion chooses to acquiesce "in the coexistence of incompatible views, opinions, and policies" this will "change the nature of Anglicanism in a way that destroys it as a communion of churches. To be specific, adoption of the second strategy [of coexistence] will issue by default in a federation rather than a communion. .... If one wishes to preserve a communion of churches, what degree of diversity is compatible with ecclesial integrity ? (p. 26)". The author proposes to establish five negative and five positive propositions (see pp. 26-27). The author believes that "no solution [to the problem of diversity] is possible apart from a biblically immersed people joined together in common forms for prayer and worship. It is here, in the accepted belief and practice of the people, that a satisfactory resolution of these issues will finally be achieved" (p. 39). "Thus, we can say by way of summary that ecclesial authority and tolerable diversity in many cases are not matters with a fixed and plainly recognizable identity. Rather, the first is preserved and the latter promoted when Christians in communion with one another are rooted in the common practice of hearing the entire Scriptures in an ordered manner and within ordered forms of common worship. When disputes arise which threaten their communion, cohesive Episcopal authority serves to preserve common practice while responsible, free and open theological debate takes place concerning matters in dispute. During the course of this debate, the presence of godliness within the communion of Christians is essential for the succession resolution of conflict. Apart from godliness, interpretations of Holy Scripture fragment, forms of worship multiply along party lines, Episcopal cohesiveness disintegrates, Episcopal authority loses its effectiveness and confessions become battle standards hoisted against people who are enemies" (p. 45).
Author is an Episcopal priest and theologian, currently Vice-President of SEAD (Scholarly Engagement in Anglican Doctrine).
Subjects
Diversity - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Authority - Religious aspects - Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion - Doctrines
Bible - Criticism, interpretation, etc. - Anglican Communion
Theology - Anglican Communion
Conciliar theory - Anglican Communion
Episcopacy - Anglican Communion
Conscience Clause - Episcopal Church
Ordination of women - Anglican Communion
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Letters from Overseas : AIDS, crime and an ordination declined

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30626
Author
Myers, Bruce (Bruce Joseph Andrew), 1972-
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Fall
Author
Myers, Bruce (Bruce Joseph Andrew), 1972-
Journal
Ministry Matters
Date
2003 Fall
Volume
10
Issue
3
Page
22-23
Notes
The author, a postulant for the Diocese of Quebec, is a radio news anchor in Montreal and a theological student at the Montreal Diocesan Theological College. He is serving an internship in the diocese of Grahamstown in South Africa. Myers describes South Africa as a beautiful and hospitable country but one which faces huge challenges. "HIV/AIDS is by far the major issue confronting this country. South Africa has the highest infection rate of any nation on the continent: 1,600 people die from it every day. One Anglican priest I spoke to this week told me that he buried five of his parishioners on a single day last week -- all victims of HIV/AIDS." Crime and violence are also huge and omnipresent problems. "Every store and ATM has a security guard, sometimes armed with billy clubs and a guard dog. Even our church hires a guard to keep watch over parishioners' cars while they are inside for the service". There is still great poverty and inequality of resources. "The dichotomy is huge and, I've discovered, still falls mostly along racial lines. Nearly 10 years after the fall of apartheid, whites seem predominantly well off, most blacks still struggling". "The church I'm at (St. Saviour's) is very active: there are six clergy. There's a big HIV/AIDS ministry, an active youth group, Mothers' Union, and more. There are two services on Sunday both well attended, although mostly divided along racial lines". The author also describes his attendance at a service of one of the indigenous African churches and how he "got to see firsthand the radically different way Christianity is evolving in this part of the world. Both churches still follow the Levitical laws of the Hebrew Bible, and take all the scriptures literally. So these Christians are kosher, worship on Saturday (the Sabbath), women's heads are covered in church, and animal sacrifice is still a significant part of their worship. At one service, a dozen chickens were sacrificed to the congregation's ancestors before we launched into a more-or-less normal service of Bible readings, hymns, a sermon, and `communion' -- but with holy water rather than wine".
Subjects
AIDS (Disease) - South Africa
AIDS (Disease) - Religious aspects - Church of the Province of Southern Africa
South Africa - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Church of the Province of Southern Africa. Diocese of Grahamstown
South Africa - Economic conditions
Violence - South Africa
Christianity and culture - China
African independent churches
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Rural training schools and seminars

http://archives.anglican.ca/en/permalink/article30758
Author
Elliott, C. Russell (Clark Russell), 1917-
Hatfield, Leonard F. (Leonard Fraser), 1919-2001
Peacock, John (John Oswald), 1910-1993
Read, Allan A. (Allan Alexander), 1923-2003
Turner, Warren (Warren Nesbitt), 1912-1976
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1952 December 15
Author
Elliott, C. Russell (Clark Russell), 1917-
Hatfield, Leonard F. (Leonard Fraser), 1919-2001
Peacock, John (John Oswald), 1910-1993
Read, Allan A. (Allan Alexander), 1923-2003
Turner, Warren (Warren Nesbitt), 1912-1976
Journal
Bulletin [Council for Social Service]
Date
1952 December 15
Issue
155
Page
1-12
Notes
"What is the `Rural Church Movement' ? Among the basic principles which constitute the essential message of this movement are the following: 1. Man's relation to the soil and to the natural resources of the earth is one of stewardship. 2. The Church has a mission to the Community as well as to the individual Christian. 3. The Rural Ministry can be and often should be a life-long vocation. 4. New ways of ministering to widespread rural areas must be tried in view of changed conditions; and the rural priest needs more adequate support in his work. 5. The Rural Church must play an increasingly important part in the life of the WHOLE Church". "Three Rural Schools or Seminars were held this past Summer [1952]. This Bulletin contains an account of each one, in order that the experience of those who took part in the Schools might be shared more widely and also that others might be encouraged to attempt something similar. These are in no sense of the word, formal reports, rather they breathe the atmosphere of the respective schools, one held along the sea-girt shore of Nova Scotia, the other two in agricultural settings in Quebec and Ontario. To these reports, there has been added one of the many papers written by the Rev. Allan Read. It describes the setting of the first Rural Training School but it is especially appropriate because it paints vivid pictures of what can happen to a rural church and its community either for ill or for good". -- Intro., pp. [1], 2.
Contents: Foreword / W.W. Judd -- Introduction / Leonard F. Hatfield -- Rural Training School Diocese of Nova Scotia / C. Russell Elliott -- Rural Seminar Diocese of Montreal / John Peacock -- Rural Training School Diocese of Toronto / Warren Turner -- A Rural Parish and a Rural Church Program / Allan A. Read -- Rural Films.
Subjects
Rural churches - Anglican Church of Canada
Farm life - Canada
Agriculture - Canada
Agriculture - Religious aspects - Anglican Church of Canada
Rural training centres - Canada
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